John Wolfe, May 19, 2006, 12:31 PM
  • Lands' End Solve The Swimsuit IssueNew York Times

    How much do women hate swimsuit shopping? Enough that online and catalog company Lands' End has developed a cult-like following for its elaborate fit system, organized around "anxiety zones," with, for example, 40 styles desinged "to minimize tummy/waist." (And don't overlook the fact that catalog shopping allows women to try on suits at home, in perfect privacy, away from the deadly glare of the store mirror.) Since Lands' End "began addressing issues of shape and fit in the late 1990s... a sizable portion of its annual sales has come from swimsuits, said David McCreight, president of the company." "We're probably one of the top swimwear businesses in North America," McCreight told The New York Times. Read the whole story...

  • Luxury Brands Finally Embrace The WebWall Street Journal (paid subscription required)

    Buying luxury goods from a boutique is far different from buying online, but why have luxury brands shied away from creating e-commerce Web sites? In the past year alone, Christian Dior, Louis Vuitton, Bottega Veneta and DKNY have launched e-commerce Web sites. The companies sell their goods for the same price online as they would in a boutique and they save on costly brick and mortar rent. Internet shopping "is no longer about discount, but about convenience," said Shifra Cook, client-services director at communications agency BLM Red. Read the whole story...

  • Sprite Goes "SubLYMONal" In Brand's RelaunchAd Age

    Sprite has traded agencies--Ogilvy & Mather for Crispin Porter & Bogusky --and marketing strategies--hip-hop for an updated take on the brand's roots--in an effort to stop its yearly decline in sales. Targeting teenagers, the campaign debuts May 23 with an updated logo, cinema ads, and a viral campaign. A voiceover in one of the five cinema ads states: "Welcome to 'SubLYMONal' advertising. For best results, do not blink." The ads follow the M.O. of agency Crispin Porter & Bogusky, known for its male-centric ads for brands such as Burger King, Volkswagen and Miller Lite. Read the whole story...

  • Burger King To Rule XboxPROMO Magazine

    Fast-food giant Burger King has taken its outlandish king mascot onto the football field and into bedrooms. Now it will take him onto video gaming platforms. In a deal with Microsoft, the faux king mascot will begin appearing in Xbox video games. The deal involves a cross-promotion that will allow Burger King customers to purchase the Xbox games for $3.99 with the purchase of a value meal. The games include fighting, racing and action games such as "Halo," "Street Fighter" and "Need for Speed." Read the whole story...

  • European Rail Service Cracks The Da Vinci Marketing CodeBrandweek

    Mass marketers may have eschewed tie-ins with controversial Sony Pictures' release "The Da Vinci Code," but the religious thriller will be the basis for a novel promotion for London-to-Paris rail service Eurostar. "There is a fantastic brand synergy between the destinations in 'The Da Vinci Code' and our specialty," Catherine Sharp, communications manager for Eurostar, North America, tells Brandweek, adding, "Nobody else has the degree of specialty knowledge and the dominance in that travel market that we do." That synergy apparently has less to do with the religious mysteries that make up the story line of the Ron Howard film, as much as it does with the exotic European locales, which tie in perfectly with the rail service's marketing campaign, and the fact that it has especially low awareness among American consumers. Read the whole story...