John Wolfe, May 23, 2006, 12:02 PM
  • Applebee's Search For New CMOKansas City Star

    Applebee's International restaurant chain is looking for a new CMO, following the announced resignation of current CMO John Cywinski. The move comes at a time when Applebee's, which last year saw its income drop by 8 percent on revenues that were up 9 percent, is making a push on the marketing front, or what it calls "an evolution" of its marketing message. The company said Cywinski is leaving after five years in the position because he wants to end his commute between company headquarters in Kansas City and his home in Chicago. He has agreed to stay on as a consultant until a replacement is found. In the meantime, the company has launched a nationwide search for a new CMO to steer its $160 million account, which will temporarily become the responsibility of Applebee's president and COO Dave Goebel. Read the whole story...

  • New CMO For Cosi RestaurantsAdweek

    Restaurant chain Cosi is about to embark on an ambitious plan to expand its number of outlets from 100 to 800 and has hired a new CMO to help the company achieve its goal. The job, a new position for Cosi, will be filled by Chris Carroll, who joins Cosi after working for six years as worldwide marketing director at sandwich chain Subway. Previously in his career, Carroll worked as vice president of advertising, sales and promotion at Burger King. He has also worked at agencies on accounts such as Pizza Hut and McDonald's. Carroll left Subway last September after the chain experienced considerable growth during his tenure. Carroll oversaw the national introduction of Subway spokesman Jared Fogle during his tenure, but his final two years were marked by short-lived relationships with respected creative agencies. Read the whole story...

  • Kellogg's Pop-Tarts To Reprise 'Idol' Tour SponsorshipPROMO Magazine

    Kellogg Co. knows a good thing when it sees it. That's why the marketer has once again signed up its Pop-Tarts brand as the presenting sponsor of the American Idols Live! Tour, a concert tour that features finalists from the 2006 season of Fox TV's wildly successful "American Idol" reality TV show. This marks the fifth year that Pop-Tarts has sponsored the tour, which runs July 6 through Sept. 2, with performances in 41 cities. The promotion calls for the company to host pre-concert events including karaoke, and fans can again pose for photos with "American Idol" finalists, and then collect their photos from an online gallery. Last year, Pop-Tarts touted the tour with an in-pack instant-win game. Game codes in 60 million packages of Pop Tarts and Corn Pops cereal awarded five grand-prize trips for two to Los Angeles to attend a recording session for a past or current "Idol" finalist. Read the whole story...

  • Wrigley Expands Product PortfolioBrandweek

    Chewing gum and candy marketer Wm. Wrigley Jr. is expanding and diversifying its product portfolio. This summer two of the company's brands, Life Savers and Altoids, will get more flavors as well as a more focused sales pitch. Both brands are relatively new for Wrigley--they were acquired in 2005 from Kraft Foods. Plans call for Life Savers to be available this July in orange mint and sweet mint while new products include Creme Savers Desserts (including cinnamon bun and strawberry cheesecake) and Life Savers Gummies Fruit Splosions. Altoids will get more flavor and package extensions to try to boost its presence. "Altoids reached its zenith with Kraft," said a convenience store wholesaler, who related he'll probably stick with the "curiously strong" brand's core mint flavors. "It's been flat or declining, so I'm not going to take that bait." Read the whole story...

  • New Research Challenges "Engagement" In Magazine AdsAd Age

    There's bad news for marketers who count magazine ads as a major element in their advertising plans. New research suggests that ads in magazines that deliver a high level of so-called engagement from their readers perform no better than ads in magazines whose readers pay considerably less attention. Engagement has been a popular buzzword in the ad industry, although its precise definition has been elusive. At its heart are marketers who want consumers to pay closer attention to their advertising messages. The survey was conducted by Starch Communications Research, which divided 25 magazines into high-engagement, low-engagement and middling camps, defining engagement by the frequency with which they are read, time spent with each issue and how much of each issue gets finished. When it examined the percentages of readers who remembered ads across the magazines, it found no link between those scores and levels of engagement. "When the buzzword of engagement became so big, starting about two years ago, we said, 'Let's really look into this,"' said Philip W. Sawyer, senior vice president at Starch. "If a magazine wasn't tabbed as a high-engagement publication, it was being discriminated against. Starch has said all along that it's a creative issue. That was our hypothesis." Read the whole story...

  • Adidas, Nike And Other Top Marketers Will Compete At World CupBusiness Week

    As the World Cup soccer tournament gears up for a June 9 kickoff, the marketing battle between rival athletic apparel marketers Nike and Adidas is expected to rival any soccer match in its intensity and level of competition. Each company is planning extensive marketing campaigns connected to the tournament, with Adidas preparing to spend close to $200 million while Nike will spend more than $100 million. Their efforts will focus on various campaigns designed to sell sneakers, soccer boots, jerseys, soccer balls, and T-shirts. Nike also has teamed up with Google to create the world's first social network for soccer fans, which launched on Mar. 15, and will roll out to 140 countries in 14 languages. But those are only two of the marketers planning to use the World Cup as a marketing vehicle. Others participating by either advertising or some form of sponsorships include Budweiser beer, MasterCard, Gillette, Yahoo!, McDonald's, and Coca-Cola. In total, experts say such marketers will shell out more than $1 billion on the tournament. "There is no real sporting event like this in the world in regard to massive global exposure," says Salvatore Galatioto, president of Galatioto Sports Partners, a New York investment firm. "It's going to spur sales of all kinds." Read the whole story...