Karl Greenberg, Jan 25, 2011, 10:45 AM
  • Smaller Stores Benefit From Economy USA Today

    Limited-assortment grocers like Aldi, Grocery Outlet and Save-A-Lot are pulling in customers looking for the kinds of savings they can't get from big retail chains.

    Prices are driving consumers to more diverse retailers, and Jim Hertel, a partner at Illinois-based food retailing consultancy Willard Bishop, says those small stores are expanding their reach. Batavia, Ill.-based Aldi, a division of Germany-based Aldi Group, has over 1,135 stores in over 30 states and intends to open 80 to 100 more this year. Read the whole story...

  • Prices Heading Up at McDonald's The Chicago Tribune

    Two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions and a few more coins on a sesame-seed bun. It seems McDonald's is readying a plan to pass the buck down the line because of higher prices of upstream commodities.

    The Oak Brook, Ill.-based chain said increases won't be across the board but on selected menu items. Major packaged-food companies, including Kraft Foods and Sara Lee, have said they will do likewise. Read the whole story...

  • Alabama Law Firm: 'Show Me The Beef, Taco Bell' New York Daily News

    Whatever it is, it's not beef, according to Montgomery, Ala.-based law firm Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin, Portis & Miles. The firm, representing a California woman in its class-action suit against Taco Bell, claims that the QSR chain advertises the filling in its menu items as "ground" or "seasoned" beef. The firm says that what's really rolled up in those burritos is only about 35% beef. The rest, argues the firm, is binders, extenders, preservatives, and additives.

    The United States Department of Agriculture website calls "ground beef" chopped fresh or frozen beef -- with or without seasoning -- that should not contain more than 30% fat and should not contain water, phosphates, binders or extenders. Read the whole story...

  • Toyota Seeks To Restore Quality With Hyper-Awareness Advertising Age

    The automaker has increased the size of its vehicle inspection teams; installed brake override systems and accident data recorders in new vehicles; created new training centers for manufacturing and supplier managers; and installed new lines of communication between U.S. operations and the Toyota C-suite in Japan. It has also created a "devil's advocate" system for vehicle design by which the company gives engineers an extra month to take apart new vehicles and evaluate them. Read the whole story...

  • NFL Is Favorite Sport, MLB Is Second In New Poll NYSportsJournalism.com

    The NFL drew record numbers on TV broadcasts this season and is keeping up the momentum on the run-up to Super Bowl XLV. More than three of ten Americans who follow more than one sport say NFL is their favorite sports, while two in ten say baseball according to a new survey from The Harris Poll.

    It is the ninth consecutive Harris Poll in which pro football has had a double-digit lead over baseball. The NFL says the 2010 season is the most-watched ever. Read the whole story...

  • Could Executive Changes At GM Hurt The Company? The Detroit News

    Detroit News columnist Daniel Howes says stability suffers when a company gets four new CEOs in less than two years. "Top management keeps changing, the vision for the company changes," he writes, pointing out that last week CEO Dan Akerson moved long-timer Tom Stephens up to chief tech officer and gave product development to Mary Barra.

    Howes says Barra, the former assistant to chairman Jack Smith, had better have the right stuff for the job. He argues that if GM loses its momentum in product development "That carried it into bankruptcy and is now driving it out," the bailout will "morph from a developing success story into a tale of outsiders who didn't really understand that more than a few people from the old GM know what they're doing." Read the whole story...