Wednesday, July 11, 2012
Karl Greenberg, July 11, 2012, 12:14 PM
  • Oh, Those Reckless Tablet Shoppers Boston Globe

    Online shopping has had explosive growth for years, and merchants have struggled to make it replicate the in-store retail experience. But tablets like iPad and Samsung's Galaxy Tab are narrowing that gap, and driving impulse buying. Consumers are likely to spend more time shopping from a tablet than from other types of devices for several reasons, said Sucharita Mulpuru of Forrester Research in Cambridge. Read the whole story...

  • Our Parents Earned Less, Did Better Chicago Tribune

    The overwhelming majority of American adults still make more money than their parents did, but upward mobility is elusive. While 84% of Americans earn more than their parents, only about a third moved up between income classes in the past four decades, according to the study, from the Economic Mobility Project at the nonpartisan Pew Charitable Trusts. Sixteen percent of all families surveyed dropped from the income levels of their parents, and blacks were more likely to be downwardly mobile than whites. Read the whole story...

  • Under Armour Feature USA Today

    USA Today delves into Under Armour in this segment of its "Race To The Top: Getting Bigger in Business" series. Innovation is clearly what the company is about. To get into the top-secret innovation lab you have to place your hand inside a Marvel-comics type scanner that reads the exact pattern of the veins on the back. This skunk works is where Under Armour developed a techno-shirt that can monitor an athlete's heart rate; and the new Spine running shoe. And there's a next-generation shirt that may some day be able to help air condition your body by reading your vital signs. Read the whole story...

  • Hyundai's Seoul Headquarters Does Global Ad AutoAdOpolis

    Hyundai's first worldwide ad campaign to build a consistent global message for the brand says "Live Brilliant," but is it? You can see the spot at the link. It features a beautiful woman in a car who leaves the city to drive around inexplicably in what looks like Joshua Tree, or some other auto beauty shot setting. Jean Halliday points out that the campaign was dictated by the "Mothership" and kind of forced on the U.S. market, as an effort to establish the brand as a premium marque. You shall judge. Read the whole story...

  • Progressive Expands 'Snapshot' Detroit Bureau

    A growing number of insurers have come up with methods of tracking driving behavior and then using it to set a customer's rates. Progressive claims that 70% of its Snapshot customers have seen a drop in their rates compared to what it was charging before - a discount of about $150 a year, on average. The industry giant says it will expand its auto insurance tracking program - even letting non-customers check it out - following studies that show the technology behind its "Snapshot" usage-based insurance is more than twice as accurate at discerning good drivers from bad. Read the whole story...

  • Appeals Court Strikes Down Cigarette Ad Measure Convenience Store News

    A New York City resolution requiring retailers who sell cigarettes to display graphic health warnings has been dealt a second legal blow. Today, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit upheld a 2010 district decision striking down the resolution, finding that such mandates were preempted by federal law. Said Murray Garnick, Altria Client Services senior vice president and associate general counsel, speaking on behalf of Philip Morris USA (PM USA). "This suit has always been about who has the authority to regulate the content of cigarette warnings. That is a power reserved to the federal government without interference or additional efforts by state and local authorities." Read the whole story...