Phyllis Fine, Dec 3, 2012, 2:09 PM
  • News Corp. Shuts Down 'The Daily'All Things D

    News Corp. will stop publication of The Daily, its daily iPad newspaper, with its Dec. 15 issue, adding some of its roughly 120-person staff (including its editor in chief and publisher) and other assets to the New York Post. The Daily, launched in February, 2011, "struggled to attract subscribers," writes Peter Kafka. Its "key issue was a conceptual one... in the end it was very much a general interest newspaper that seemed to be geared toward people who didn’t really like newspapers." Read the whole story...

  • Hearst Prez: Tablet Readers Cool To InteractivityMashable

    Most readers of magazines on tablets don't want extra interactive bells and whistles -- they "just want the product itself,” Hearst President David Carey told an industry conference, "echoing the sentiments expressed by editors at The New Yorker and Popular Science," writes Lauren Indvik. "The industry overshot the interactivity early on," Carey noted, explaining that the first iPad "issues of titles, including Esquire and O: The Oprah Magazine, were loaded with multimedia and interactive elements," which have been toned down also because of technical glitches, writes Indvik. Read the whole story...

  • Newspaper Acquisitions Continue Despite 'Dead Industry' WarningsPoynter

    In the latest of a spate of newspaper acquisitions, Clarity Media Group bought The Colorado Springs Gazette from Aaron Kushner’s 2100 Trust investment group, which made the sale only four months after the latter had bought the paper, according to Caitlin Johnston. She details other "deals announced since the fall of 2011, [including] Warren Buffett’s purchase of his hometown Omaha World-Herald, followed this year by the acquisition of 63 newspapers owned by Media General." Her conclusion: "The newspaper buying-and-selling market is busy these days for an industry many have written off as dead or dying." Read the whole story...

  • Univision Rebrands Second Largest NetworkNew York Times

    Univision is rebranding and revamping its second largest network TeleFutura,  giving it the new moniker UniMás, "as a direct shot at Telemundo, a rival for second place among domestic Spanish-speaking viewers," writes Tanzina Vega. "The network will offer new content and a consumer marketing campaign aimed at a younger, male Latino demographic." Read the whole story...

  • Chicago TV Station Suffers Two Big Bloopers In Three DaysTVSpy/mediabistro

    Oops! Not a good few days for CW affiliate WGN, which made two flubs in its news reporting on Sunday night and Friday. The Sunday goof: Anchor Robert Jordan misspoke, calling Christkindlmarket, Chicago's German holiday market, "Kristallnacht" -- the name of the "1938 Nazi riot that destroyed thousands of Jewish businesses and synagogues," writes David Griner in Adweek.

    And on WGN's Friday morning newscast, two anchors reported that a small plane had just crashed on a Chicago street. Only problem: the crash was a fictional one, being filmed as part of a TV show. Read the whole story...