Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Phyllis Fine, January 2, 2013, 3:50 PM
  • News Corp. Buys Ohio Sports NetworkReuters

    News Corp. bought Cleveland-based regional sports TV network Sports Team Ohio, which broadcasts Cleveland Indians games, for an undisclosed sum that could be close to $230 million, according to a source cited by Reuters. "News Corp has been stepping up efforts to control the rights to key sports teams in response to Time Warner Cable Inc's $3 billion deal in February 2011 to carry the Los Angeles Lakers basketball games on its Time Warner SportsNet Channel." Read the whole story...

  • California Newspaper Owner Defies Digital TrendsYahoo News

    Can first-time newspaper owner Aaron Kushner succeed by "defying conventional wisdom [by] spending heavily to expand the printed edition and playing down digital formats" at the Orange County Register? According to Elliott Spagat, who details Kushner's strategy in this piece, "It's too early to know whether he's right. Kushner said advertising revenues have grown, though he won't say how much." Read the whole story...

  • Women's Mags: Editors Learn To Swear, 'Glamour''s Hairy IssueNew York Times

    Two pieces on women's mags to begin the year: Adweek's Emma Bazilian writes about Glamour's first "hair-themed issue-within-an-issue with its own cover, table of contents and editorial that begins on the opposite side of the book," exclusively sponsored by Unilever and featuring an unnamed cover girl we're certain has to be Zooey Deschanel, according to the clues Bazilian provides.

    Next up is a trend piece by Christine Haughney on how women's magazine editors are finally allowing some vulgar words on the covers and inside their books -- although on a limited basis. "Women’s magazines perhaps haven’t pushed the boundaries enough yet to see whether readers will push back," writes Haughney. Read the whole story...

  • Is Coffee Bad For You? Who Knows? -- Least Of All, Science WritersColumbia Journalism Review

    Personal-health stories abound in broadcast and print journalism, and yet these reports often focus on contradictory or just plain wrong information, asserts David H. Freedman in a long, well-thought-out piece. 

    "The problem is not, as many would reflexively assume, the sloppiness of poorly trained science writers looking for sensational headlines, and ignoring scientific evidence in the process," Freedman writes.

    Instead,  "personal-health journalists have fallen into a trap. Even while following what are considered the guidelines of good science reporting, they still manage to write articles that grossly mislead the public, often in ways that can lead to poor health decisions with catastrophic consequences. Blame a combination of the special nature of health advice, serious challenges in medical research, and the failure of science journalism to scrutinize the research it covers." Read the whole story...