Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Phyllis Fine, February 5, 2013, 4:07 PM
  • Netflix Lures Binge Viewers With 'Cards'Variety

    The new trend of "binge-viewing" -- watching as many episodes of possible of a TV show, perhaps a whole season, in one seating -- was "in full force" during the first weekend that Netflix's entry into original content, "House of Cards" was available, "according to data from Procera Networks, which found on one broadband network that about one-quarter of those who watched the first episode motored through all 13 episodes," writes Andrew Wallenstein. "Of course, viewing levels only means so much to a streaming service that doesn't carry advertising," he adds. "What percentage of those watchers are new subs is the most important data point." Read the whole story...

  • NBC Will Stream Content In 1,200 Philadelphia CabsPhilly.com

    NBC is extending its out-of-home reach in Philadelphia, equipping 1,200 taxis with "video screens that stream NBC10 news updates, weather, CNBC business news, and NBCUniversal entertainment to cab hoppers," writes Bob Fernandez. Previously there were 100 cabs so equipped. There are 12,000 cabs streaming NBC content -- more than half in New York City, with others in Boston, Miami, San Francisco, Las Vegas, Chicago, and Dallas. Read the whole story...

  • E-tail Still 'Harder Than It Looks' For Print MediaAdweek

    Legacy media companies experimenting with a "profitable model" for their ecommerce efforts are finding "it’s a lot harder than it looks," according to "veterans of the space" cited by Emma Bazilian. She examines the difficulties, from lack of "a merchandising strategy as meticulous as [print media's] editorial strategy," according to one source, to "getting consumers to transition from browsing to buying." Read the whole story...

  • Doesn't Anybody Care About 'NY Times' Buyouts?Buzzfeed

    In the wake of last week's New York Times staff buyouts, why hasn't there been any "real glimpse inside the newsroom, no sense of what the rank and file are feeling, no temperature-taking"? asks media reporter Doree Shafir. "Until very recently, the Times was the towering institution in American media, the object of endless fascination and obsession," but now "the intrigue behind the walls of the old-school media giants that I was obsessed with back in 2006 and 2007 — the Times, the Wall Street Journal, Condé Nast — seems much less, well, intriguing when the narrative hinges on layoffs, not innovation. So maybe that's why no one reported on last Friday's wake; it was just another depressing sign of an industry in the throes of wrenching contraction." Read the whole story...