Thursday, October 28, 2004
  • , October 28, 2004, 12:00 AM
  • CBS MarketWatch is hoping to auction itself for as much as $400 million, according to a report in today's The New York Times. Read the whole story...
  • E-mail service provider Lyris Technologies has acquired Piper Software, a small firm that makes hosted deliverability tools. Financial details weren't disclosed. Piper offers an array of products designed to ensure e-mail marketing messages get past spam filters and can be read in a variety of e-mail clients. Lyris hopes to cross-sell the products to its customer base of over 4,000 clients. The larger company made the purchase at least partially in response to a JupiterResearch report issued in August, which found deliverability to be an area of weakness for Lyris. Read the whole story...
  • You've heard the hype: Wi-Fi is booming. Businesses large and small are partnering with telecommunications and development companies to create Wi-Fi hotspots. The Yankee Group reports the U.S. will have 72,480 hotspots by 2007, and estimates the number of global wireless Internet users will grow to 1.78 billion by the same year. In-Stat/MDR puts the latter number even higher. The company says the market is likely to gain an average of 186 million new subscribers annually to reach a total of 2 billion by 2007. Read the whole story...
  • In its latest study of Americans' online habits, the Pew Internet & American Life Project found that a substantial chunk of internet users want to voice their opinions online. Websites that want to remain relevant should strongly consider building in ratings systems that allow visitors to leave input about what they find on the site. More than 33 million Americans, or a quarter of all adult internet users in the country, have rated a product or service, the study said, underscoring the value of ratings systems that give users input about content or products they find online. Read the whole story...
  • Video game and mobile phone companies are set to make money this year as customers use phones to zap space invaders or sink game-winning golf putts, pushing the mobile gaming market over $1 billion, a study said. Read the whole story...