Friday, March 25, 2011
  • Gavin O'Malley, March 25, 2011, 12:20 PM
  • R. R. Donnelley & Sons Co. isn't saying how much it's paying to buy up Journalism Online and its Press+ paid content management system. Sources, however, told paidContent that the purchase price is likely between $35 million-to-$45 million, including possible earn outs. When I spoke with News Corp.'s Jon Housman earlier today, he would say only that the company's minority stake had "appreciated considerably."

    The only thing Gordon Crovitz would say about the value of the deal is: "We're very happy with this transaction." According to paidContent, Journalism Online was only on the block briefly before the R.R. Donnelley deal was brokered by the Jordan, Edmiston Group.

    "The decision to look for a buyer came as the company was looking at further investment," paidContent reports. Crovitz, the former publisher of the Wall Street Journal, said the sale also comes as the paid content question shifts from whether or not consumers will pay, according to paidContent. Read the whole story...
  • Bing this week added tweets from Twitter on the Bing News search results pages. "The tweets are public updates from the Twitter stream related to the news query," reported Search Engine Land. For example, search for [japan] on Bing News, and you'll now see a box on the right that says "Public updates for japan," Search Engine Land's Greg Sterling explains. Users can pause the stream of tweets, if they want to slow down the stream. They can also click through to read the tweet by the Twitter user directly on Twitter.com.

    Meanwhile, users can click on the "more updates" link to be taken to Bing's Social Search results for that query. Min-John Lee, senior program manager at Microsoft Bing news and real-time search, confirmed in a tweet that this was new. He said, "@dannysullivan bing news just launched twitter tweets in news search results. (cc @sengineland)." Adds Sterling: "The Bing News search results page does look a bit cluttered and can maybe benefit from a slight redesign." Read the whole story...
  • InsideView just announced $12 million in funding in a series C round led by Foundation Capital. As NewEnterprise explains, "The service deploys within existing CRM applications like Oracle, SAP, Salesforce.com, Microsoft CRM and SugarCRM to enhance the information view on a person or company with data gathered from numerous sources."

    When users look at the window for a target, they see information taken from their LinkedIn and Facebook profiles, information about them from Jigsaw, but also what people are saying about their company on Twitter. There's also corporate financial and relationship data from CaptialIQ -- a powerful financial database owned by McGraw-Hill -- and a news feed from Thomson-Reuters, NewEnterprise reports.

    What differentiates InsiderView from other social enterprise software players? Says CEO Umberto Milletti: "Most of the social CRM space has been focused on the marketing and support use cases. We're very focused on business-to-business sales." Read the whole story...
  • Risking it reputation as an open-source crusader, Google says it will delay the distribution of its newest Android source code, dubbed Honeycomb, at least for the foreseeable future, Bloomberg Businessweek reports. "The search giant says the software, which is tailored specifically for tablet computers that compete against Apple's iPad, is not yet ready to be altered by outside programmers and customized for other devices, such as phones."

    Unlike its rivals, Google has traditionally made the underlying code for its popular Android operating system publicly available, so anyone could access it and tailor it for use in mobile phones, tablets, television set-top boxes, even automobiles. "It's the throngs of smaller hardware makers and software developers that will now have to wait for the software," Bloomberg Businessweek writes.

    "To make our schedule to ship the tablet, we made some design tradeoffs," says Andy Rubin, vice-president for engineering at Google and head of its Android group. "We didn't want to think about what it would take for the same software to run on phones." Read the whole story...
  • Google has reportedly begun testing Google Music internally, but whether existing music services should be worried remains to be seen. Taking the news as a sign "that the much anticipated service is nearly ready to launch," CNet writes: "Employees at the online behemoth have begun a process commonly referred to in Silicon Valley as dog-fooding, in which employees try out a new service or product." "Google wants to operate a ‘locker' music service, which gives users access to all of their personal music files from a cloud-based server, and has begun testing the service internally," writes MediaMemo. "But just like Spotify, Google can't launch without label deals -- or, at least, it doesn't want to launch without label deals-and so far it doesn't have anything locked down." "The service will most likely be unveiled at Google I/O, the company's big conference for developers in May," Business Insider suggests. Negotiations with at least some of the top publishers and with the four largest record labels are ongoing, according to CNet, citing sources. "The delays are largely due to the complexity of the subject matter," it writes. "Google is after cloud music rights and not just for songs acquired from Google Music." "Even with those setbacks," 9to5Mac writes, "Apple is best poised to bring such a service to the market due to its marketing muscle, the iTunes ecosystem and the leading status it enjoys in the music industry."As Digital Trends notes, CNet's report is corroborated by comments made by Motorola CEO Sanjay Jha, who mentioned to the Guardian last month that Google had a "music service" in the works. Also, "A recent report from Billboard, which named executives rumored to be working on Google Music, adds further evidence that the streaming service is on its way." Read the whole story...