• Gavin O'Malley, Mar 29, 2011, 11:50 AM
  • Twitter Has A Spamming ProblemFinancial Times Despite previous efforts to clean up its network, Twitter still seems to have a spam problem. As FT.com reports, Fred Wilson, a Twitter investor at Union Square ventures, just tweeted: "Apparently my twitter account was DM'ing people who @mentioned or RT'd me since this morning. No idea how it happened. Sorry for the spam". What's more, FT.com writes, F-Secure, an internet security company, has noticed that spammers appear to have worked out how to game Twitter's very own @TopTweets account, which has more than 1 million followers.

    About a year ago, Twitter said it had reduced the percentage of tweets that were "spammy" from a peak of almost 11% in summer 2009 to less than 1% in February 2010, it said. No word on the present percentages, but, based on these anecdotes, it doesn't look encouraging. Unable to get comment from Twitter on the state of its spam issue, CNNMoney.com writes: "Hopefully, dealing with spam is on the to-do list of Jack Dorsey, now back 'leading product' at Twitter as the company's executive chairman." Read the whole story...
  • Cheezburger Can Has 'Know Your Meme' CNN Unlikely Web publishing powerhouse Cheezburger Network is acquiring Know Your Meme. Neither party would disclose financial details of the deal, which is rumored to be in the low seven figures, reports CNNMoney.com. "There was a vacuum in our publishing portfolio," explains Cheezburger founder Ben Huh, who believes his readers will benefit from the addition of a site that explains viral content and evolution of stories on the Internet.

    Helping his cause, Cheezburger just recently closed a $30 million funding round. But, what's a meme? Well, "Were you singing Rebecca Black's 'Friday' on repeat, or asking the towel-clad 'Old Spice Guy' questions on Twitter or Facebook? Remember the Double Rainbow dude?" asks CNNMoney.com. "If the answer is yes, you're familiar with a 'meme' -- a catchphrase (think of Charlie Sheen's #tigerblood) or a concept that becomes a byproduct of the Internet, spreading through e-mails, blogs and social networking sites." Says Know Your Meme editor Brad Kim: "We try to provide a coherent timeline on how these phenomena evolve and develop through conversation," says Read the whole story...
  • One Nation Under FacebookThe New York Times While reshaping the Web in its own social imagine, Facebook has also been busy positioning itself as a friend of Washington, reports The New York Times. Indeed, "Facebook has layered its executive, legal, policy and communications ranks with high-powered politicos from both parties, beefing up its firepower for future battles in Washington and beyond," The Times reports.

    There's Sheryl Sandberg, the former Clinton administration official who is now Facebook's chief operating officer. Then there's Ted Ullyot, a general counsel former clerk for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia who is now general counsel for the social network. Most recently, reports surfaced that Robert Gibbs, President Obama's former White House press secretary, might be joining Facebook's communications team.

    Why does Facebook need so much political might? It's only "redefining the notion of privacy and transforming communications, media and advertising in the Internet age," The Times writes. Read the whole story...
  • Amazon Launches Music ProductsReadWriteWeb What's the big fuss about Amazon launching a suite of music products, which lets users store their tracks online, and then stream them over the Web or to any Android device? "The launch has the tech world abuzz, not only because Amazon beat Apple and Google to the punch ... but because Amazon hasn't even received the record labels' permission to host these tracks on its servers as of yet," reports ReadWriteWeb.  Likewise, "Apple is rumored to be working on a similar service and I've already seen evidence of Google Android devices gaining music storage and synchronization in the cloud, but neither company has delivered yet," writes GigaOm. Still, "If you're a music lover looking for a paradigm shift in the way you consume tunes, this won't be it," insists MediaMemo.

    "Amazon skipped to the head of the cloud line by not bothering to get new deals at all, and says it doesn't need a special license to let people listen to music they already own." "Announcing a service before a company has such deals in place can cause headaches for technology companies," notes The Wall Street Journal. "Google began touting a music service in May of last year but even after months of negotiations with major record labels, the company's Google Music service has yet to materialize. To date, "The outlook for music retailers not named Apple has been cloudy at best," explains USAToday.com. Even after this most recent launch, however, "It remains to be seen whether Amazon can whack away at Apple's digital music dominance.

    Meanwhile, as The New York Times points out: "Several experts in digital music say that the music locker business is still legally ambiguous. For example, though some companies let people upload their music and listen to it elsewhere without any outcry from the labels, others, like MP3tunes, have been sued by music labels." Read the whole story...