• Gavin O'Malley, Nov 25, 2011, 10:58 AM
  • Kayak Sees Strong Q3, Postpones IPO TechCrunch Kayak posted $61.16 million in revenue for the third quarter ended September 30 -- up 28% from the same period last year. Yet despite the strong performance -- as AllThingsD first reported in September -- the travel search engine has at least temporarily put IPO. Net income for the third quarter was $12.7 million -- up 44% from the same quarter in 2010, in which net income was $8.7 million, TechCrunch reports. Also of note, in the nine months ended September 30, 2011, Kayak processed 679 million user queries for travel information, which is up 45% over the nine months ended September 30, 2010, according to TechCrunch. “It’s a good sign for Kayak that revenues and profits are increasing both yearly and quarter over quarter considering the intense competition the site faces in the online travel space,” TechCrunch writes. “Google just launched its flight bookings and search portal, which is powered by the recent acquisition of ITA Software.” The company also increased revenue slightly from the second quarter 2011, which came in at $56.7 million.   Read the whole story...
  • What's Eating Alibaba?Reuters Showing that no market is immune to the West’s dept issues, Alibaba.com just posted its slowest growth in nearly two years. As Reuters reports, China's largest e-commerce firm -- which links Chinese businesses looking to sell their goods to overseas buyers -- recorded an uninspired 11.9% rise in net profit for the third quarter, “with the company raising concerns due to a weak trade outlook stemming from debt woes in Europe and the United States.” Analysts attributed the quarterly results, which missed analyst forecasts, to a weak macroeconomic climate that led to a slower pace of customer additions. Also, Alibaba Group, parent of Alibaba.com, experienced a series of protests and dissatisfaction from its clients and suppliers. In response, "They are focusing on the quality of suppliers and also improving the overall quality of products that they are offering, such as some of the newer services to help buyers to check the quality of products before they are shipped," Dick Wei, an analyst with JPMorgan, told Reuters. "If you look at customer growth, there are no new initiatives and growth is not that top priority at this point," Wei added. "Revenue will pick up again later in 2012 or 2013."       Read the whole story...
  • Changing Parents' PC TechThe Atlantic Despite any hard data to back it up, The Atlantic’s Alexis Madrigal makes a convincing case that the holidays have become a time for millions of older Americans to update their personal computing technology. To clarify, it’s not moms, dads, grandmas, or grandpas who are updating anything, but their children and grandchildren, who, home for the holidays, are shocked to find their loved ones still using, say, Internet Explorer 6! Madrigal also has some good advice all you well-intentioned holiday visitors. Say, if dad doesn’t want anyone fooling with his machine, just tell him he won’t be able to watch funny fishing videos on YouTube with IE6 anymore. “Usually, by this point, most parents are begging for help, and you can extract excellent perquisites for your labor,” Madrigal writes. Also of note, Madrigal doesn’t suggest changing your family members’ browser provider. “No putting Chrome instead of Firefox or Internet Explorer,” he directs. “Keep it simple.” Meanwhile, “Make sure to be on hand the first time they open up the browser to accept responsibility for the change on behalf of ‘The Cloud,’ which you will testify has started changing people's software without asking. When they ask you what The Cloud is, shake your head, and stare off into the distance.”   Read the whole story...