Thursday, May 24, 2012
  • Gavin O'Malley, May 24, 2012, 12:35 PM
  • Facebook Gives Developers More Data Despite a few distractions, Facebook this week said developers would now be able to track all of the activity going on within the social net with far more granularity. Apps that publish Open Graph stories, for example, will now be able to track the unique numbers of publishes, views, and clicks said app attracts. “This type of analytics will help companies hone in on exactly what’s working for them, and exactly what’s going on when they see spikes in usage,” The Next Web writes. What’s more, developers will now see how many unique users have seen and accepted their Facebook authorization dialog. This type of information should help developers answer a range of questions like, say, why their app isn’t converting to actual new users. According to TNW: “Open Graph stories show even more promise for developers than the Like ever did, letting people share and interact with actions being taken outside of the social network.” More to the point: “For those of you wondering how Facebook will ever monetize its 900M userbase, this is an early glimpse into how it’s preparing to do just that.” Read the whole story...
  • Mobile Threatens Browser Diversity As it stands, consumers can freely choose between four or five browsers to surf the Web. Yet, some suggest that the rise of mobile devices threatens such freedom. “On personal computers running Windows, Macs, and Linux, you can pick from a variety of browsers, finding the best combination of user interface, performance, expansion, customization, and other attributes,” CNet explains. “But on a host of devices ranging from today's iPhones to tomorrow's Windows RT tablets, though, things are very different.” The notion that the browser is a feature of the operating system -- “an idea Microsoft floated to defend against an antitrust attack in the 1990s regarding the link between Internet Explorer and Windows,” CNet recalls -- is again gaining steam. While many of the newer devices will technically accommodate other browsers besides those that come with the operating system, those third-party browsers won't always get the full privileges and thus power of the built-in browser. What’s at stake? The very fabric of the Web, Johnathan Nightingale, senior director of Firefox engineering, tells CNet. "Today's Web is the product of strong browser competition on performance, stability, and feature set," he says.   Read the whole story...
  • App Platform Kony Cops $15M Mobile app development platform Kony Solutions has closed a $15 million series C round of financing, led by Insight Venture Partners. With cash in hand, “The startup is looking [to] fund the deployment of new sales and marketing programs, regional expansion, and to ramp up hiring,” TechCrunch reports.  Kony’s master plan is to develop technologies and apps that both facilitate and accelerate customer engagement on any mobile operating system, device or channel. Through its flagship product, KonyOne, the startup offers a development environment and mobile middleware that allows big businesses to build and launch both enterprise and consumer apps. “As a result, Kony now offers support for nearly every technology and deployment option out there, from native apps on all native OSes, HTML5-capable browsers, single page apps, wrappers, hybrids, and more -- even support for BYOD deployments,” TechCrunch notes. “The agility and scalability of its platform have attracted more than 70 Fortune 500 companies, banks, airlines, as well as automotive and insurance companies.” In early 2011, Insight also led Kony’s $19.1 million series A financing,   Read the whole story...