Music Licensing Service Goes Mainstream

TechCrunch, Tuesday, June 29, 2010 1:33 PM
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Giving artistic license to auteur of all shapes and sizes, music licensing company Rumblefish has debuted a new music program for YouTube users that lets them buy a lifetime, worldwide music license on a particular music track for $1.99, which they can then fully edit into their videos. Visitors to the Friendly Music online store can access Rumblefish's catalog of copyright-cleared songs -- of about 35,000 tracks -- which they can use to create soundtracks for their videos. The service, which launched today but had been announced last week, provides a solution to CG videos getting pulled because they used copyrighted music.

"Buyers receive an official license for every song they use, so when they upload their finished video to YouTube they can be confident it will not be blocked or deprived of its audio," writes TechCrunch. FriendlyMusic offers royalty-free songs by artists in generic styles ranging from rap, reggae and R&B to country, pop and techno, as well as full orchestral recordings of classical compositions. New music is reported added to the catalog on a daily basis, while, in the coming months, the company says the Friendly Music catalog will expand to include "handpicked collections of name artists.
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