'USA Today' Guarantees Online Ad Viewability

USA-Today-B2“Viewability” may not be a word according to spell-check, but it’s an important concept for online advertising, as advertisers fear their messages may end up “below the fold” or otherwise tucked away in some obscure corner of a Web page. With that in mind, USA Today is partnering with comScore to guarantee the viewability of online advertising appearing on its Web site, promising greater accountability and transparency for advertisers.
 
The new campaign uses comScore’s Validated Campaign Essentials and Digital Analytix Monetization tools, which the online measurement firm introduced earlier this year.

The services allow publishers and advertisers to confirm that digital ad impressions were actually seen by the target audience, and are part of USA Today’s attempt to position itself as a premium ad environment through the combination of large, eye-catching ads and viewability guarantees.
 
This isn’t the only big new ad initiative from the Gannett-owned entity.

The iconic national newspaper is following up a comprehensive redesign of its print and digital platforms -- revealed in September as part of its 30th anniversary celebrations -- with a new competition highlighting print advertising’s versatility and potential.

The 2012 USA Today Print Advertising Competition is soliciting entries from advertising agencies, marketers and nonprofits, who are invited to submit their most creative ideas for a chance to win $1 million worth of full-page print advertising.
 
Entries will be judged on the creativity and originality of the ad visual storytelling and clarity of writing, according to USA Today, which said the competition will be judged by a panel of industry execs. Entries can be submitted beginning Oct. 8 and the contest will remain open through Nov. 26. A grand prize winner and two runners-up will be announced in January 2013.

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1 comment about "'USA Today' Guarantees Online Ad Viewability".
  1. Don Mitchell from Freelance Media Professional , October 4, 2012 at 9:28 a.m.
    The real question is, are they still using the "50% viewable for one second" as the measure?