Mass Relevance To Merge With Spredfast, Cater To Social Marketers

The social marketing space is a little less crowded now that Mass Relevance has agreed to merge with Spredfast. Taking the Spredfast name, the two firms are forming a new entity, which they promise will meet clients’ every social marketing need.  
 
Headquartered in Austin, Texas, the new Spredfast will be led by current Spredfast CEO Rod Favaron.
 
“The merger was an easy decision for both companies,” Favaron said on Wednesday. “Spredfast and Mass Relevance are like-size companies and almost exactly the same in every measure.”
 
Sam Decker, cofounder and CEO of Mass Relevance, will join the board of directors and serve as executive advisor to the new company.
 
Spredfast helps marketers plan, publish and manage daily brand engagement with consumers across any social network, while Mass Relevance specializes in the creation of social experiences across digital channels.
 
“There is no one out there that does what we do collectively,” Favaron said.
 
Combined, the firms claim about 600 clients, north of a billion social connections across 84 countries, and somewhere in the neighborhood of 15 billion monthly impressions. Spredfast clients include AT&T, Caterpillar, and Starbucks, T. Rowe Price, Whole Foods, and Warner Brothers.
 
Mass Relevance has worked with Pepsi, Campbell’s, GE, Target, Walgreens and Microsoft, among other top-tier brands.
 
Analysts were expecting the consolidation that now appears to be sweeping the social-marketing space.
 
Over the next two years, the number of social-leaning vendors and agencies will shrink from roughly 200 to less than 24, Mukul Krishna, digital media industry analyst at Frost & Sullivan, recently told Social Media & Marketing Daily.

Of late, more notable tie-ups include social media management firm Sprinklr scooping up Dachis Group, and Lithium Technologies agreeing to buy Klout for a reported $200 million.
 
This year, advertisers are expected to pump nearly $12 billion into social networks around the world, according to eMarketer. That’s 25% more than marketers spent on social last year.
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