You've Come A Long Way, Baby

With an estimated 4 million babies born in the U.S. every year, the number for marketers to pay attention to is $10,000 to $12,000. That’s the average to low end of the budget that today’s mom-to-be will spend as she prepares for baby’s arrival. Women having babies and raising young children are the Millennial generation, a group that makes up about 21% of the U.S. population and the largest consumer group to emerge since the Baby Boomer generation.

Engaging with Millennial Moms, gaining their loyalty and winning their business means using dramatically different tactics compared to prior generations of moms. The differences are sharply influenced by technology and the desire these moms have for unique, customized experiences.

These moms believe there are better ways to do things and are tenacious in their search for baby gear, furniture, clothing, health products and more. As gender reveal parties tell us, these moms are all about making every phase of pregnancy a unique, customized experience.

Social Media Is King. Products and brands with a presence in social media are in the Millennial Mom’s virtual playground. I mention this in every post and it seems too obvious, but reaching moms through social media, and particularly video is crucial. Letting her access everything on her phone is even more important. Almost all Millennials — 90% — admit to texting photos of a possible purchase to another person for approval, while 58% say they use their phones to look up store hours and locations. About 55% check their social media accounts at least twice each day for an estimated total of 17 hours each week. Millennials also embrace new social media quickly, as seen by the explosive growth of Pinterest and Instagram. 

Moms-To-Be Focus on the Green. Not the money. Even if there isn’t much interest pre-pregnancy, many moms-to-be become focused on green baby products. Cloth diaper companies like Bum Genius, started by a mom of four, is just one example of a company that is making cloth diapering a popular option. Another company, Premama, offers a prenatal vitamin in powder form, to mix in to the Millennial generation’s ever-popular smoothies, after the founders held a focus group in 2010 where young women begged for an alternative to awful prenatal horse pills. The company boasts vegetarian, non-GMO, non-allergen formulas that resonate with young women.

Circle Of Influence Is Broader Than Ever. From the moment the pregnancy stick is positive (and even before), women are seeking information about everything baby-related, from prenatal vitamins to car seats and strollers. Witness the explosion of sites like TheBump.com and WhatToExpect.com as women seek information, visit forums and look for recommendations and reviews for pregnancy and beyond. 

Technology In the Stroller. Moms rely on their phones for everything, including keeping baby safe and entertained. An award-winning product called SnuggWugg is a pillow that holds a cell phone to keep from kicking and squirming on the changing table and even entertained in the stroller. The SnuggWugg won a Huggies MomInspired grant, a program that awards grants to mom-invented products. 

Look at Niche Markets. There are niche groups with large, active followers where moms engage on a daily basis. Multiples groups like Twiniversity are more popular than ever as twins are now one-third of all births in the U.S. These moms have unique experiences and they love to share! 

Keeping up with Millennials as early adopters of new technology and social media is the challenge of marketers, businesses and brands.

Tags: gen y, moms
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1 comment about "You've Come A Long Way, Baby".
  1. Jackie Bird from Redbean Society, LLC , May 12, 2014 at 10 a.m.
    Very insightful, however a hugely important factor for marketers is that Hispanic Millenial moms over index Total Millennial Moms by 113 and that over 50% of these births are among Hispanic Moms. The implication here is that for brands to be successful with Millenial moms, they must understand the cultural nuances that are relevant to the values of acculturated Hispanic moms and view this market as a total market. If you are not speaking with these moms, you are in fact missing half the mark!