Monster Updates Look, Tools For Modern Job Search

The market has changed since Monster pioneered the online job search category. Specifically, employers and seekers are increasingly looking to social channels as they look to fill positions. 

To that end, Monster is unveiling two new recruiting services geared specifically for the social world, and an updated brand identity to reinforce its mission of connecting people and jobs anywhere. 

“From a business standpoint, we’re attempting to evolve our strategy [to] essentially add new ways to do what we do already,” Ted Gilvar, chief marketing officer of Monster, tells Marketing Daily. “Since Monster started the online job board business, over time, we’ve adjusted to the way we connect jobs with people.”

The two new products, TalentBin by Monster and Monster Twitter Cards, are geared toward helping employers connect with job candidates. The first, created via an acquisition, corrals profiles of potential job candidates by harnessing the professionally relevant information people share via their social networks. The tool, Gilvar says, will help employers find prime candidates even among those not actively seeking a new job. 

“It’s a great way to reach what we call ‘passive candidates,’” Gilvar says.

Meanwhile, Monster Twitter Cards allow employers to send out branded tweets (that can go longer than the standard 140 characters), complete with job description and relevant hashtags, to more effectively spread the word about job openings. “It goes beyond the traditional tweet because we can use expanded messaging and enhanced branding,” Gilvar says. “People use social media. That’s where they are all day, and an open job is a valuable piece of social content [for companies].”

As Monster expands its offering, the company is also launching a new brand identity. Replacing the lower-case, purple-colored “monster” is a new logo that puts a bolder font on a rippling purple flag. In the new logo, the “M” and “R” that begin and end the name are capitalized. 

“Because we were a pioneer in the category, people have an entrenched way that they think about us,” Gilvar says. “As we’re expanding our products, we wanted people to think differently about what we do.”

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