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Elizabeth Elfenbein

Member since January 2011 Contact Elizabeth

Elizabeth is a creative leader and Partner at The CementBloc, a healthwellness communications company based in NYC. Elizabeth launched Happy Fuel LLC with the release of their NEW : ) fuel app. The : ) fuel app is a social application that fuels, gauges and pays happiness forward. She is also the Editor in Chief of Convergent Times, an industry-first publication from The Bloc that provides our point of view on the challenges facing the health and wellness industry and the opportunity we have to transform how we communicate with our customers. Elizabeth leads the Wet Cement Innovation Lab at The CementBloc, our platform for thought leadership, that drives events, publishes, as well as creates digital prototypes that propel success for brands.

Articles by Elizabeth All articles by Elizabeth

  • Caring For The Caregiver in Marketing: Health on 08/26/2014

    Today's healthcare communications focus on three stakeholders: the patient, the doctor, and the payer. Communicating to caregivers generally occurs in much the same way as it does with patient materials, but I'm not sure this should be the case.

  • Life-Changing Ideas From Cannes  in Marketing: Health on 08/04/2014

    June 2014 marked the inaugural Lions Health Awards in Cannes, France, billed as a "Festival for Creativity" in healthcare communications. The two-day event took place immediately prior to the weeklong Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, and promises to be for healthcare advertising what Cannes Lions is to general advertising.

  • Health Hackers in Marketing: Health on 04/29/2014

    We live in a time where just about everything is being hacked. The current "hacking" dynamic has grown beyond the computer security context to be more about appropriation: taking something intended for a specific use and making it serve one's own use. And hacking occurs in almost every vertical; it's even crossing cultures. The important question for us as marketers is: what's motivating the hackers? Very often, hacking is about solving an unmet need of the end user. It's a perfect example of the customer telling the brand what he or she wants, not the other way around.

  • The Forewearable Future in Marketing: Health on 03/25/2014

    Last month I offered up the idea of wearable health, focusing on technology, such as Fitbit, Jawbone, etc, as a driver of behavior modification. I envisioned a kind of turbo-charged health consciousness, led by devices you wear that (hopefully) keep you honest and accurate. But really all of the data suggest that wearable technology is barely in its infancy-the mad dash to launch looming on the horizon with a projected swift uptake. Kind of like phase 3 trials in the healthcare industry, with approval "coming soon."

  • Wearable Health in Marketing: Health on 01/28/2014

    Not too long ago I was invited into "All Things Crowd," a group on Facebook that focuses on the convergence of crowdsourcing, crowd-funding, collaborative consumption, and the sharing economy. One of the group's most recent conversations was around wearable technology and our thoughts about it. Being in the health and wellness space, I can't help but be more focused on the potential of this technology to impact health outcomes and less on the sophistication of the technology itself, which in fact is pretty damn impressive.

  • Health Takes A Holiday in Marketing: Health on 12/31/2013

    A worthwhile challenge would be to harness the same peer pressure that encouraged us to eat an extra holiday cookie into encouragement to run an extra mile the rest of the year. Which is exactly the idea behind fitness bands like Nike+, Jawbone Up, and Fitbit. They help us track our progress, and also share and compare it with the progress of others.

  • You've Come A Long Way, Patient in Marketing: Health on 10/29/2013

    Once upon a time, the doctor/patient story centered on two stock characters: the venerated, trusted doctor, and the more or less passive patient. The doctor could be friendly and comforting, or aloof and clinical, but he or she called the shots; a patient might be a "good patient" or a "bad patient," indicating how well he or she followed doctors' orders. As a patient, you went to your doctor (or specialist), he or she arrived at a diagnosis, you left the office with a prescription and/or a treatment plan, and you went on your way. It was a one-way conversation, not a dialogue: you listened, obeyed, and (hopefully) got better. The end.

  • I Am Not A Number; I Am A Patient  in Marketing: Health on 07/23/2013

    Taking treatment personally.

  • Igniting The Gross National Happiness Quotient  in Marketing: Health on 05/28/2013

    In Bhutan, the Gross National Happiness (GNH) is an indicator the government uses to measure happiness among the Bhutanese people. This commitment to gauging people's happiness and well-being demonstrates an understanding that the happier people are, the greater is their ability to be productive. Happiness has very positive ramifications on a national socioeconomic level. The GNH index is meant to orient the people and the nation towards happiness, primarily by improving the conditions of not-yet-happy people. The ultimate purpose has been to increase well-being and happiness for a greater number of people. It's pretty impressive for the leadership of a country to understand the value and meaning behind happiness and its effect both on the individual and on the collective good.

  • Building Is Believing in Marketing: Health on 04/23/2013

    We often hear, "Seeing is believing," underscoring a basic truth: that belief is something that must be earned. But belief doesn't happen overnight. Whether we're talking about belief in a person, a religion, an institution, or a brand, belief takes time to accrue. Belief must be built. And once it's established, belief is a force that drives behavior at the deepest level.

Comments by Elizabeth All comments by Elizabeth

  • Healthy Observations by Prodeep Bose and Elizabeth Elfenbein (Marketing: Health on 02/18/2011)

    <p>Good question Ed. </p> <p>Maybe the way to think about mentoring on a universal level is, to create educational communications that are more relevant, digestible and to my above point, bite-size. I agree with your comment that people need hand-holding, the problem is people are so busy and &quot;how&quot; and &quot;when&quot; can we insert yet another thing into their daily lives. </p> <p>Mentoring might come in the form of portable tools that all consumers at various ages can leverage to help them live healthier.</p>

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