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Gordon Hotchkiss

Member since August 2004Contact Gordon

Meet Gordon at MediaPost Events

  • Gordon attended OMMA Global at Advertising Week, September 27, 2010

Articles by Gordon All articles by Gordon

  • America, You're Great (But You Might Be Surprised Why) in Online Spin on 10/25/2016

    The first time I went to Washington D.C., I was struck by the extreme polarity I saw there. That day, the Tea Party was staging a demonstration against Obamacare on the Mall in front of the Capitol building. But this wasn't the only event happening. The Mall was jammed with gatherings of all types, from all political angles: the right, the ultra-right and left, the rich and poor, the eager and entitled, the sage and stupid. The discourse was loud, passionate and boisterous. It was -- in a word -- chaos.

  • You've Got A Friend In Me: Our Changing Relationship With A.I.  in Online Spin on 10/18/2016

    Since Siri first stepped into our lives in 2011, we're being introduced to more and more digital assistants. We've met Amazon's Alexa, Microsoft's Cortana and Google's Google Now. We know them, but do we love them?

  • Why Millennials Are So Fascinating in Online Spin on 10/11/2016

    Millennials are probably the first generation since the Baby Boomers that bridges that adoption of a massively influential technological change. Most definitions of this generation have their birth years starting in the early 1980s and extending to 1996 or '97. This means the early Millennials grew up in an environment that was not all that different from the generation that preceded it. The technologies that were undergoing massive adoption in the early '80s were VCRs and microwaves -- hardly earth-shaking in terms of environmental change. But late Millennials, like my daughters, grew up during the rapid adoption of three massively disruptive technologies: mobile phones, computers and the Internet. So we have a completely different environment to which the brain must adapt not only from generation to generation, but within the generation itself. This makes Millennials a very complex generation to pin down.

  • Prospect Theory, Back Burners And Relationship Risk in Online Spin on 10/04/2016

    What do relationship infidelity and consumer behavior have in common? Both are changing, thanks to technology -- or, more specifically, the intersection between technology and our brains. And for you regular readers, you know that stuff is right in my wheelhouse.

  • 'Affix Label Here' in Online Spin on 09/27/2016

    I saw Kate and Will this past weekend. Yes, I'm on a first-name basis with them. You might be, too. After all, we know them so well. For those of you not in the Royals' inner circle, you might know them better as the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

  • Why Our Brains Are Blocking Ads in Online Spin on 09/20/2016

    If you're looking for a culprit to blame for ad blocking, don't look at the technology or the companies deploying that technology. New technologies don't cause us to change our behaviors. Instead, they enable behaviors that weren't an option before. To get to the bottom of the growth of ad blocking, we have to go to the common denominator: the people those ads are aimed at. More specifically, we have to look at what's happening in the brains of those people.

  • The Bermuda Triangle Of Advertising  in Online Spin on 09/13/2016

    In the past few weeks, via the comments I've received on my two (1,2) columns looking at the possible future of media selection and targeting, it's become apparent to me that we're at a crisis point when it comes to advertising.

  • Sorry, Folks: Blame It On Ed in Online Spin on 09/06/2016

    Just when you thought it was safe to assume I'd be moving on to another topic, I'm back with more on the rise of the audience marketplace. Blame it on Ed Papazian, who commented on last week's column.

  • The Rise Of The Audience Marketplace in Online Spin on 08/30/2016

    Far be it from me to let a theme go before it has been thoroughly beaten to the ground. This column has hosted a lot of speculation on the future of advertising and media buying -- and today, I'll continue with that theme.

  • To Get The Hip Is To Get What It Means To Be Canadian in Online Spin on 08/23/2016

    Something strange happened last Saturday night. An entire nation stopped to watch a rock concert. And I mean the entire nation. As far as Canada was concerned, even the Olympics were put on hold when the Tragically Hip took the stage in Kingston.

Comments by Gordon All comments by Gordon

  • The Rise Of The Audience Marketplace by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 08/30/2016)

    Thanks all for your comments. I actually just submitted tomorrow's column before the recent round of comments. There's a lot of potential follow up here..especially Esther and Doc's contributions. I'll be ruminating further on this.

  • Media Buying Just Tip Of Advertising's Disruptive Iceberg by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 08/09/2016)

    Thanks Ed and Maarten...great points. Regarding the "Hub" concept, I probably didn't add enough of my own thoughts on this topic, as it wasn't the main point of my column. Rather than a hub, I would place my bets on an aggregated media marketplace that is more democratized than our current models. I think audience identification and customization based on multiple (and smarter) segmentation criteria will move media buying to "audience" acquisition. These thoughts are admittedly off the top of my head. Perhaps I'll fully bake them in a future column. Regarding Maarten's comments on filtering - we essentially agree. I meant "objectivity" and "reliability" in terms of what the consumer perceives those things to be. There are all kinds of biases and personal preferences still in place, but I do contend that we are looking for information sources that we perceive as objective and reliable.

  • Trump's Bump: The Scary Appeal Of The Authoritarian Father by Barbara Lippert (Mad Blog on 07/28/2016) reading this, I was reminded of something I had read in the past. It took me a bit to dig it up..but found it: "From the standpoint of social development, the family cannot be considered the basis of the authoritarian state, only as one of the most important institutions which support it." Another quote, "(the goal is) producing an individual who is adjusted to the authoritarian order and who will submit to it in spite of all misery and degradation. At first the child has to submit to the structure of the authoritarian miniature state, the family; this makes it capable of later subordination to the general authoritarian system." It was from Wilhelm Reich. The work was the Mass Pscyhology of Fascism. It was written in 1933.

  • Why Marketers Love Malcolm Gladwell -- & Why They Shouldn't by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 05/24/2016)

    A few additional comments..First..Kenneth - you're absolutely right. Mea culpa. Ted. Absolutely word of mouth and influencers is a huge factor  - my point - and Duncan Watt's point - is it's not nearly as simply or predictable as Gladwell makes it out to be. Anyone could be an influencer, given the right context. You cite a Fast Company article defending influencer marketing - here's one on the opposite side worth a read: Watts discredited? Not really by any credible academic source - just a lot of marketers pissed off because he's poking holes in their business model. And he's certainly got a lot more empirical evidence behind him than Mr. Gladwell.

  • Why Marketers Love Malcolm Gladwell -- & Why They Shouldn't by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 05/24/2016)

    Jeanne - Watts is a very able writer. His prose is accessible - but he is an academic at heart and so doesn't have a habit of jumping to satisfying conclusions, unlike Gladwell. Watts tells things as they appear to be, backed up with empirical evidence, rather than as we wish them to be.

  • The Collateral Damage Of Disruption by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 03/01/2016)

    Thanks Kenneth. I'm amazed at how some will find one semantic bone to pick, while skipping over the much more important larger consequences (intended or not). What is important here, as you point out, is the idea of disruption as driven by a technological catalyst and the resulting impact on entire industries. And another important distinction. Hayek and Schumpeter both saw entrepreneurialism as the force that drove creative destruction. But what is interesting about what we're seeing is the role of the user in this, empowered by new technological capabilities and challenging an existing supply chain. There is a networked, distributed dynamism at work here that may be a brand new flavor of disruption.

  • The Face Of Disruption by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 02/23/2016)

    Thanks Paula..I assume you mean for President. I would say I don't qualify, but seeing as both Ted Cruz and I were born in Calgary, who knows?

  • A New Way to Determine Corporate Value by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 02/09/2016)

    Rick - thanks for your thoughtful comments. You should have access to the paper. It's a free download.

  • Why I'm (Cautiously) Optimistic About 2016 by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 12/22/2015)

    Coincidentally, just found this amazing data visualization that's on the same theme:

  • In Honor Of My Dad by Maarten Albarda (Online Spin on 12/21/2015)

    MaartenCondolences to your family and yourself. I also lost my Mom earlier this year. And, like you, I had some bitterly beautiful moments near the end of the journey. We have to listen hard to the wisdom shared with us by those that have walked a difficult path.Gord

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