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Matthew Greitzer

Member since September 2004 Contact Matthew

Articles by Matthew All articles by Matthew

  • Beyond Retargeting: 5 Keys To Programmatic Success For Retailers in Real-Time Daily on 07/27/2015

    The digital advertising industry has been abuzz over the past year due to the adoption and early success of programmatic media. Simply defined, programmatic media automates and simplifies the digital ad-buying process as well as generating more effective results by applying Big Data to more accurately target and engage prospects and customers.

  • Programmatic Media Can Transform Local Marketing in RTB Insider on 05/15/2015

    Brick-and-mortar retailers, franchises, dealer associations and many other national marketers with localized marketing needs struggle with digital media - display and video in particular - because the trafficking and analytics challenges of managing hundreds, if not thousands, of small campaigns are too daunting to tackle. The emergence of programmatic technology platforms changes all of that. Programmatic creates operational efficiencies for local marketing organizations by automating thousands of individual efforts, allow companies to manage planning, campaign deployment, reporting and optimization centrally from a single platform, and tailored to meet market-specific needs.

  • Making Data Work in RTB Insider on 04/03/2013

    Conventional wisdom holds that using third-party data for ad targeting is not effective, especially for direct-response-oriented campaigns; that despite all the fanfare about audience-based buying, micro-segmentation and intent-based-targeting, third-party data just doesn't live up to the promise. The reasons offered by doubters are varied - the data are too expensive, the data are bogus, inventory is all that matters, and so on - but the conclusion drawn is always the same: third-party data doesn't work.

  • The Third-Party Cookie Monster in OMMA Magazine on 05/14/2010

    In the very active debate over online consumer privacy the voices of the agency and, by proxy, the marketer. are absolutely crucial. Matthew Greitzer, vice president of search marketing and head of Atom Systems, recently sat down to chat with Omar Tawakol, CEO of BlueKai to discuss privacy, best practices, and agencies' roles in the great debate.

  • The Waiting Game in Search Insider on 12/04/2009

    In wrapping up my Search Insider contributions this year, I would like to address the development of 2009 that will likely have the greatest impact on the search marketing landscape for the next decade: the pending search deal between Microsoft and Yahoo.

  • Search Extension in Search Insider on 11/06/2009

    We are closing in on the end of 2009, and if this year is anything like years past (Q4 2008 aside), we should soon see advertisers asking for advice on smart ways to spend incremental budgets before year-end. If you are a retailer, you'll have no problem identifying qualified search marketing opportunities for incremental spending. But for advertisers in most other categories, the economics and scale for search marketing in the holiday period are not necessarily improved. For some categories like travel, for example, the fourth quarter is a seasonally weak time period. If your search campaign is fully scaled, what are the next most efficient opportunities you can explore?

  • The Year (Almost) Of Mobile Search in Search Insider on 10/09/2009

    To be honest, I had written off mobile and mobile search. Despite years of hype, we've seen only pockets of relevant opportunities for our clients, and even there the opportunities were very, very small. The other week, however, I had a conversation that piqued my interest. In speaking with the heads of mobile at Google and MSN, respectively, I learned their data independently verified that smart phone users exhibit mobile search behavior almost identical to that of desktop-based searchers. This is a profound and deeply important insight: smart phone users are treating their handsets like a portable desktop; they are browsing, searching and transacting on their phones.

  • Yes, Display Ads Can Work -- And Benefit Search As Well in Search Insider on 09/11/2009

    There's a new frontier opening in the display advertising landscape, in which small and medium-sized businesses can execute effectively and deliver results that are, if not as effective, at least as compelling as those generated through search. And given the interplay between display advertising and search activity, these businesses should be able to use this new opportunity to better scale their already effective search campaigns.

  • Blame It On Twitter  in Search Insider on 08/14/2009

    There is certainly no lack of worthwhile topics to discuss this month, but I can't hone in on one. So this month's column is a bit of a Sm"rgåsbord. Here's what's up.

  • Google's Next Act in Search Insider on 07/17/2009

    I've written several times over the last year about the emerging opportunity in auction-based display media, especially as it relates to ad exchanges. A small group of us at my company hypothesized that these "search-like" capabilities applied to display media could produce "search-like" performance, even though display media is a push, not pull, medium. So far our hypothesis has been correct. And though the ad exchange market is a tiny fraction of the $30 billion global search market, we think it's a channel worth betting on. Apparently Google does, too. In the next few weeks Google will likely release version 2.0 of its DoubleClick ad exchange.

Comments by Matthew All comments by Matthew

  • Two Dirty Little Secrets Of Demand-Side Networks by Cory Treffiletti (Online Spin on 12/09/2009)

    (Sorry about the spelling errors in the last post, I hit submit too soon. Here's a cleaned up version): Cory, You raise some good points in this article, though I think a few are misguided. The value of an ad network is marginalized when inventory can be acquired in bulk in a spot market (ad exchanges) and optimization technology can be licensed (the ones on the market today are as good as anything the ad networks built in house - some are even former ad networks themselves). Agencies got into this space because they saw they could replicate some of the value add networks provide with better service and transparency while pushing more client dollars to "working media" by taking less of a cut for their services than ad networks have taken historically. Many of the demand side platforms, mine included, are totally upfront with clients about their pricing model. It's not a "dirty little secret." At Razorfish, in fact, we make clients sign a separate contract independent of an insertion order specifying our fee structure. And we have to compete for our planners' dollars just as any other ad network. We win out by delivering better performance, or we lose the buy. In this model, I don't see any conflict of interest, and I feel strongly that separate fees for the planning function and the demand platform function are warranted. If an agency is explicitly directing planners to buy through their demand platform and taking a markup on both sides then I agree, there is an obvious conflict. I don't see how that model is sustainable long term.

  • Two Dirty Little Secrets Of Demand-Side Networks by Cory Treffiletti (Online Spin on 12/09/2009)

    Cory, You raise some good points in this article, though I think a few are misguided. The value of an ad network is marginzalized when inventory can be acquired in bulk in a spot market (ad exchanges) and optimization technology can be licensed (the ones on the market today are as good as anything the ad networks built in house - some are even former ad networks themselves). Agencies got into this space because they saw they could replicate some of the value add networks provide with better service and transparency while pushing more client dollars to "working media" by taking less of a cut for their services than ad networks have taken historically. Many of the demand side platforms, mine included, are totally upfront with clients about their pricing model. It's not a "dirty little secret." At Razorfish, in fact, we make clients sign a seprate contract independant of an insertion order specifying our fee structure. And we have to compete for our planners' dollars just as any other ad network. We win out by delivering better performance, or we lose the buy. In this model, I don't see any conflict of interest, and I feel strongly that seprate fees for the planning function and the demand platform function are warrented. If an agency is explicity directing planners to buy through their demand platform and taking a markup on both sides then I agree, there is an obvious conflict. I don't see how that model is sustainable long term.

  • Do We Need A Different Kind Of Search Conference? by Gord Hotchkiss (Search Insider on 09/17/2009)

    Gord, great post. I couldn't agree with you more.

  • A Search Tale: Good Quality Puppies At Reasonable Prices by Matthew Greitzer (Search Insider on 02/27/2009)

    So, to be clear, I did not go the puppy mill route, and wasn't considering it; thought it made for good material. I bought my dog from a breeder in Virginia, Coldwater Labs (http://www.coldwaterlab.com/). They are a reputable, responsible breeder and I would highly recommend them.

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