• Athletes Rebel Against Social Media Ban Evening Standard

    Dozens of track and field athletes have hit out at Rule 40 - one of a string of strict guidelines set down by organisers to protect the Games from "ambush marketing" and ensure only official sponsors can be named. Athletes who break the rule can be fined, have their accreditation removed and even be disqualified. The online revolt gained traction among the cream of US track and field athletes, who do not receive government grants toward their training and rely on income from sponsors, prize money and part-time jobs.

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  • YouTube Rants Are All The Rage The Independent

    When it was revealed last week that Kristen Stewart had cheated on her boyfriend Robert Pattinson, there was possibly only one person more devastated than R Pattz himself. Emma Clarke, 25, from Carlisle, a huge fan of the "Twilight" films in which the couple star, posted a self-filmed rant on YouTube that sees her break down in tears over Stewart's actions. "I don't understand why she would do this?" she cries. The video instantly went viral, notching up a million hits in just one day.

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  • Mr Bean Beats Out Queen In Opening Ceremony The Telegraph

    Rowan Atkinson's cameo performance sparked the biggest spike in mentions of the event on Twitter. The comic actor appeared with the London Symphony Orchestra, playing a single note on the piano during a rendition of Chariots of Fire. London 2012 is the first Games to see Twitter play a major role, with the Olympics mentioned by more than 10 million users since Friday's ceremony. Lizzie Armitstead, the British cyclist, gained new followers at a rate of 500 per second after winning silver in the women's road race yesterday, with more than 25,000 following her less than an hour later.

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  • 'Mail Online' Most Popular Newspaper Site In World? Press Gazette

    Quoting figures from Comscore, which uses a survey-based method rather than logs from publishers' computers, Mail Online claimed it had 44.7 million monthly unique visitors in June. This makes Mail Online the most popular newspaper website in the world according to Comscore, which gave the next-rated New York Times 38.1 million unique visitors that month. According to Mail Online, the Comscore data also gives the title a strong lead on the BBC with 35% more monthly unique visitors globally than BBC News.

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  • Digital Subscriptions For FT.com Overtake Print Circ Journalism.co.uk

    The latest results report that FT.com subscriptions were up 31% year-on-year to 301,471, with a 29% rise in registered users to 4.8 million. This compared to an average daily print circulation of 297,227 for the same period of 2 April to 1 July 2012, based on Audit Bureau of Circulation reports. In its end-of-year results for 2011 FT.com reported 267,000 digital subscribers. The latest figures show a total global paid-for circulation of 598,698, with an average daily global audience of "close to 2.1 million".

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  • UK Digital Publishers Showcase Olympic Features Journalism.co.uk

    Here is a list of just 16 examples of interactive features which have been produced by UK news outlets in the run up to the Olympics; from interactive maps collecting multimedia snippets of the torch relay and virtual tours of the Olympic Park, to fact-packed guides to the sports and athletes and personalised interactives letting the user pitch themselves against sporting champions.

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  • UK Finds Google Breached Privacy Agreement BBC

    Google has admitted that it had not deleted users' personal data gathered during surveys for its Street View service. The data should have been wiped almost 18 months ago as part of a deal signed by the firm in November 2010. Google has been told to give the data to the UK's Information Commissioner (ICO) for forensic analysis. The ICO said it was co-ordinating its response with other European privacy bodies.

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  • How Ironic: Twitter Disrupts TV's Cycling Coverage The Guardian

    The BBC blamed the Olympic Broadcasting Service (OBS) for the lack of information which left commentator Chris Boardman using his own watch to estimate timings. But the International Olympic Committee said fans sending updates to Twitter while watching the race had in effect jammed transmissions of race information. The tweets led to the failure of electronic race updates reaching TV commentators.

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