Thursday, August 16, 2012
  • 'Dandy' To Quit Print Edition, Going Online Only The Guardian

    The Dandy, the UK's oldest children's comic, will cease weekly print publication and go online only after its 75th anniversary edition in December, publisher DC Thomson has confirmed. Ellis Watson, chief executive of the Dundee-based publisher's newspaper and magazine operations, said that the 75th anniversary edition on 4 December will include a reprint of the first-ever Dandy, which went on sale in 1937.

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  • Facebook Going To The Dogs In The UK Red Rocket Media

    Around seven per cent of UK dogs are thought to have a Facebook page, standard.co.uk reports. New research from Petplan has found that besotted owners anthropomorphise their pets so much that some even create Facebook pages for their pets. This figure could also be set to grow further over the coming years, with the number of pet profiles appearing on social networks increasing by 36% year-on-year.

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  • Global Digital Music Spending To Hit 5 Billion Euros The Telegraph

    Streaming sales - listening to tunes on the likes of Spotify and Deezer - are set to take over as the leading revenue growth engine for the music industry, the report predicts, as music-lovers increasingly experiment with sampling new artists and listening to back catalogues online. In the UK, streaming revenues will grow at over four times the rate of online music downloads this year, helping increase Britain's digital music spend by GBP51 million to GBP411 million in 2012, Strategy Analytics said.

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  • Generational Shift: The Convergence Of Global Tech The Guardian

    Moving from Auntie Beeb to the Gray Lady may have a pleasing ring. But that Mark Thompson can swap the director general's chair of the BBC for a Manhattan chief executive's office also marks a significant, generational shift: it is the moment when global and technological convergence has reached the point where it is possible for the leader of Britain's public-service broadcaster to land a $5m-a-year job as boss of the company behind the New York Times, the most famous newspaper in the U.S.

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  • YouTube Video Of Games Ran 20 Million Hours Plus The Drum

    Google search volume around the world was dramatically higher during the London Olympics than during Beijing in 2008, it has been revealed, while YouTube video streaming of the Games reached over 20 million hours. In America, there was a 900% increase in searches for Ryan Lochte, meaning that interest in swimming increased by 25% over all; while Usain Bolt meant Jamaican searches for track and field increased by 40%.

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  • Guardian Upgrades Its IPad Eyewitness App Journalism.co.uk

    The Guardian reported that the app has been downloaded almost one million times with an average of 11.5 million page views a month this year. Last year the app was shortlisted for a Webby Award in the category of best tablet app, as well as a web innovation award at the Foreign Press Association Media Awards in 2010. In a video outlining the new features of the relaunched app, head of photography, Roger Tooth, said the publication of a compelling news photo, which began in the centre pages of the newspaper in 2005, is "just as popular on the iPad".

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  • Brits Favor Looks Over Brains On Social The Telegraph

    A survey carried out by Intel, into the social media habits of different nationalities, found that 56% of Britons care about looking as good as possible on their social media profile pages. However, in the Middle East and the rest of Europe, social media users are far more concerned about appearing intelligent when posting information online - with 61% saying they wanted to seem intellectual when sharing content and their views on sites such as Facebook.

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  • 200-Year-Old UK Weekly Survives Into Digital Age The Guardian

    Happy 200th birthday to the Windsor Express, one of the oldest newspapers in Britain. Founded in 1812, it has survived into the digital era after a name change, a shape change and a transformation into a free title (though some copies are offered for sale). It was launched by Charles Knight, a book-seller and printer, and passed after his death to his son, Charles Junior. It eventually ended up in the hands of the Oxley family who ran it for the best part of 150 years.

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