• Today, I Accept Your Nomination
    For years we have blamed the banner (display) ad for all of our problems. The thing is, the ad banner didn't fail us. We failed it. We were handed a new medium with millions of consumers on day one. We were handed an exciting new ad to sell to advertisers that could instantly transfer a consumer to an advertiser's (online) store. We were selling time travel. Advertisers, while initially skeptical, quickly started writing big checks to buy these display ad banners. Then we screwed it all up. So what's the problem today? Just about everything. In my fantasy of being ...
  • Run, Tim, Run
    In 2009, Tim Armstrong took over AOL and I wrote this column. In light of the Verizon-Yahoo deal, in which Yahoo will be integrated with AOL, it seems newly relevant.
  • Why Citizen Journalism Works For Sports
    Publishers are realizing the benefits of content produced by citizen journalists -- allowing anyone to become a writer and share their passionate point of view. Here are a few ideas to help publishers tap into this important industry trend and increase engagement with this sought-after millennial audience segment.
  • 'Who Does That?'-- A Lesson For All Sellers
    Two weeks ago, I got to spend time with Noel, a former co-worker of mine from the dot-com 1.0 daze. He shared a story that stuck with me enough to write about, because there was a simple lesson in it for all of us selling for a living.
  • Can Micropayments Help The Publishing Industry?
    Micropayments for publishing have been the subject of significant debate for a number of years, garnering a combination of staunch supporters and loud critics. In general, supporters think that micropayments will encourage readers to pay for content that they find valuable.
  • Is Social Key To Innovating Sports Digital Advertising Experience?
    Advertisers and sponsors clamor to be involved with sports, given the unique opportunity for brands to align themselves with the passion fans feel. The sports industry as a whole has evolved to meet the needs of a growing fan base, and advertisers that are hoping to capture fans' attention, in all aspects except one: The digital advertising side still falls short.
  • Finding The Answer In Search
    Eighty-five percent of all digital advertising dollars don't get spent with premium online publishers. Instead, that ad spend goes to just two companies. What makes this so alarming is that the eyeballs are there. Traditionally, that's the issue with any struggling media -- the consumers aren't there -- but that's never been the problem with online publishers. Fraud, non-human traffic and viewability issues are mild symptoms at best. If those issues went away tomorrow, 85% of all digital ad dollars would still not be spent on premium publishers. So what's the problem?
  • The ANA Is Adding Insult To Injury
    For the past few days I've had the pleasure of participating in the Advertising Research Foundation's 2016 Audience Measurement conference. While my overall experience has been great, the conference was off to a bad start for me. The closing session on Sunday afternoon, titled "Ad Fraud & Blocking: The Industry Update from the Front Lines," featured several industry luminaries, including Bob Liodice, president and CEO of the Association of National Advertisers (ANA). During that session, Liodice managed to rankle me -- not once but twice.
  • The Hypocrisy Of The Transparency Debate
    After a few months of relative quiet, the issue of transparency is once again rearing its ugly head, thanks to a recent report by the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) titled "An Independent Study of Media Transparency in the U.S. Advertising Industry." Not surprisingly, the report has generated a lot of noise in the industry, and advertisers are once again up in arms about what they perceive to be shady, if not outright illegitimate business practices on the part of agencies. While I would not condone illegitimate business practices, I find the outrage to be highly hypocritical and, frankly, pretty ...
  • Fixing The Pricing Problem Behind Private Exchanges
    When people hear complicated communication, they nod their heads so they don't seem confused - but inside, their gut is pushing the "someone is trying to sell us something" panic button. The words used to describe private exchanges are still unnecessarily complicated.
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