Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Around The Net

  • YouTube Debuts New iPhone AppThe New York Times

    This summer, news broke that Apple was dropping YouTube from its list of built-in iPhone apps. Firing back, YouTube on Tuesday debuted its own -- new and improved -- iPhone app. “Though YouTube lost its prominent place on the iPhone’s home screen, it gained something arguably more important: the ability to show mobile ads,” The New York Times’ Bits blog writes. Indeed, “Because the new app is built in-house by YouTube, it is no longer subject to Apple-enforced restrictions, meaning ads are now fair game,” AppleInsider explains. “For Google, this means it can now earn some serious coin from mobile ... ...Read the whole story

  • Marie Claire October Issue To Carry Video Ad Media Week

    Marie Claire, the monthly women's magazine owned by IPC, is carrying a video ad for a Dolce and Gabbana fragrance in the pages of some copies of its October edition. The ad has been inserted in a few thousand copies of the 396-page issue, on pages 34 and 35. It features a 45-second video ad including sound, which plays when the reader opens the page. Procter & Gamble, the company licensed to produce the fragrance, placed the ad through media agency MediaCom. ...Read the whole story

  • UK Takes To Video, Mobile Ads Willingly M&M Global

    UK consumers are willing to engage with instream video ads and mobile advertising more keenly than their global counterparts. Due to high levels of user experience with video advertising in the UK, viewers seem to be more willing to watch video ads, indicated by higher completion rates than the broader region. The difference was the highest among instream videos, where 75.02% of video ads played to completion, compared to 74.32% in Western Europe and 56.94% in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. ...Read the whole story

  • Ivi.ru Is Hollywood's Route To Russian VOD PaidContent.org
Is YouTube Becoming More Like Facebook?

Before the Facebook IPO, a former-entrepreneur-turned-VC told me that Facebook was caught between a rock and a hard place, because its massive size was proving to be a double-edged sword: "How can it possibly ever increase ...More