• Google Eases Rules On Publishers That Violate Its Ad Policies
    Google said it's changing how it enforces its ads policies: "It will now strike ads from individual web pages that violate its ads standards. That means Google will effectively be cutting fewer websites out of its ad network," Recode reports. The upshot is that sites may also be suspended on the AdSense platform for violations. Simiarly,  publishers may also be suspended or disabled from using AdSense. "Previously, a publisher’s full site would be suspended from ad placements if only one page violated Google’s policies," Recode said. Google and publishers in the AdSense network share ad revenue so the …
  • Snap Unveils New Camera Ads
    In a bid to stay one or two steps ahead of Facebook, Snap has launched new camera ads, Bloomberg reports. The ads, or promotional "Lenses" superimpose brand logos and other images on a user's photos and videos. Notably as its user growth slows, "Snap is also selling Lens ads for audiences smaller than its national deals," Bloomberg reports. While a campaign on Snapchat typically costs anywhere from $300,000 to $700,000, "a national campaign for the more real-world-focused ads could go for 30 percent more," according to the Bloomberg report. say people familiar with the matter. Snap is also offering advertisers a way to play with …
  • Google And Ad Blockers: Can They Eliminate Bad Ads?
    Mashable explores how a strange alliance between Google and ad blockers could beat down bad ads. Recently, Google said it's even looking at launching its own ad blocker. While the pairing might appear strange, "it's more understandable when you consider one fundamental truth about ad blocking companies: They don't exist to block ads — they exist to serve as middlemen between ads and consumers. The biggest ad blockers charge the biggest advertising vendors to let their ads pass through their software. They're better described as ad filters than ad blockers," Mashable reports. Further, the report suggests that "ad blockers aren't all …
  • Transparency In Programmatic Media Sales
    As marketers demand more transparency in the programmatic media buying process, media holding companies are trying to meet their needs. Omnicom "clients are opting for an 'unbundled' deal structure, 'which puts us in a position of treating it as if we were their agent and not selling them a product,'  [said]  Omnicom Chief Executive John Wren on an earnings call last month," according to a Wall Street Journal report. "An unbundled model typically involves itemizing costs instead of the approach in which media costs are bundled with agency and tech costs. That has had an impact: the company said first …
  • YouTube Brand Safety Issues Caused 5% Of Top Advertisers To Leave
    Analytics firm Media Radar estimated that 5% of the leading advertisers suspended advertising on YouTube due in April compared to the prior month due to brand safety issues that emerged a couple of months ago.  The 5% are reportedly "customers of Google Preferred, YouTube's program for advertising on its top-tier videos," according to a CNBC report. CNBC reported that media buying firm Havas pulled its U.K. clients, and several brands including L'Oreal, McDonald's, Audi, Starbucks, Pepsi, Dish Network, and General Motors ads from YouTube and other Google platforms. Google is working to address the problems.
  • Data Is Now The World's Most Valuable Resource
    Data is now the world's most valuable resource according to The Economist, which reports on antitrust concerns about Alphabet (Google's parent company), Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Microsoft, all of which have tons of data.  The report said Amazon captures half of all dollars spent online in the U.S., while Google and Facebook accounted for almost all the revenue growth in digital advertising in the U.S. last year. Along with all that profit, comes data. "Smartphones and the internet have made data abundant, ubiquitous and far more valuable. Whether you are going for a run, watching TV or even just sitting …
  • News Corp. Aims To Make A Dent In Google's Ad Dominance
    In a bid to take advantage of Google's brand safety woes, News Corp. has launched a new service that aims to make sure digital ads don’t appear next to fake news or offensive videos, according to a Bloomberg report. The company's Storyful division will track websites that are known as "purveyors of fake news or extremist content and share that list with advertisers, who can use it to keep ads from appearing in controversial places." Google's YouTube has scrambled to reassure advertisers that their ads are appearing in brand-safe environments. GroupM and Weber Shandwick are the first two customers that …
  • What Advertisers Should Take Away From Google Parent Alphabet's Earnings
    Google posted solid Q1 earnings amid the controversy over brand safety and YouTube. The Wall Street Journal reports that advertisers should keep in mind five things from the earnings report: The fallout from brands' suspension of advertising on YouTube may hit in Q2 and Google executives remain confident about revenue growth on YouTube, Google is taking action on brand safety issues, the mobile search business is growing, machine learning advances will help improve ads, and TV advertising on YouTube TV isn't a priority yet.
  • More Than Half Of All Digital Ad Spending Is Mobile
    The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) said that mobile advertising represented more than half of all digital ad spending in the U.S. in 2016. The IAB and PwC reported that mobile ad spending accounted for 51% of $72.5 billion in total digital ad spending in the U.S. last year. Mobile advertising increased 77% to $36.6 billion last year, while digital ad spending overall rose 22% in the U.S. from the prior year. Where video advertising is concerned, spending rose 53% to $9.1 billion, while mobile video spending increased by 145% year-over-year to nearly $4.2 billion, the IAB reported.
  • Facebook Takes On Fake News
    Facebook has begun testing a new feature within its Related Articles function in a bid to squash fake news, according to a TechCrunch report. Facebook will ask readers  whether they think a a headline is true or not, and see other perspectives on the topic before they read articles. The Related Articles widget usually appears when readers return to the newsfeed after opening a link. Under the new feature, Facebook will also "show Related Articles including third-party fact checkers before you read an article about a topic that many people are discussing. Facebook says, 'That should provide people easier access …
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