App Use Higher On Android Tablets Than Smartphones

In a follow-up to its report last week comparing app usage on iPhones and iPads, app ad and analytics firm Flurry takes a similar look at how use differs among Android phone and tablet users. New data from IDC last week showed Android to be more dominant then ever on smartphones, representing nearly 80% of units shipped globally in the second quarter.
 
The sample of 45,000 Android devices used in the Flurry study underscored the platform’s strength on handsets. Within the sample drawn from its app network in May, 88% were smartphones and 12% were tablets. That compares to the iOS sample in which 72% of the devices were iPhones, and 28% were iPads. With that in mind, the differences in who uses Android phones and tablets -- and how -- are similar to that of iOS devices.
 
As with iOS, Flurry broke down app use on Android devices according to psychographic segments, or personas, in order to categorize behavior. Among the groups that skew most heavily toward Android phones are avid runners, “hip urban lifestylers,” singles, personal finance geeks, business professionals, and catalog shoppers.
 
Android tablet users were more likely to include pet owners, small business owners and auto enthusiasts -- pointing toward more stay-at-home use. The same pattern was seen in iOS devices, with home-based segments like pet owners more prevalent on the iPad, and “on the move” personas like singles and hip urban lifestylers drawn to the iPhone.
 
Because Samsung is the largest maker of Android phones and tablets, Flurry took a closer look at usage on these devices. Samsung smartphones accounted for 59% of phones in the sample and 42% of tablets. It found that Samsung device owners were more likely to cut across many segments -- including those most sought after by marketers, like business travelers and moms.
 
In short, the data indicates that Samsung owners are more avid app users than Android users with other types of devices. Overall, Android tablet users spent 64% more time using apps than those on Android smartphones. iPad users also spent more time with apps than iPhone owners, at 42%, but the imbalance was not as pronounced. The difference in Android time spent varied widely by category.
 
People with Android phones spent five times more time with business apps, for example, than those on tablets. But education, communication and game apps skewed more toward tablets. Samsung smartphone owners spent 14% more time with apps, and Samsung tablet users, 10% more time.

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