New Streaming Media Group Launches SMAAC.net

by Jul 19, 2000, 9:10 AM
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The Streaming Media Advertising Advisory Council (SMAAC), a group of the industry's leading players, today announced the launch of SMAAC.net, an online companion to the Council created in June. In addition, key executives from Microsoft and Pseudo.com have joined the organization.

While it is not new to the Internet industry at large, streaming media is obviously in a nascent stage as an advertising medium. It is, however, unique in that it converges the broadcast medium with the Internet, and thus, organizers say, a framework needs to be created that considers both online and offline advertising practices. Therefore, SMAAC will be discussing the most basic advertising principles that apply to this medium -- ad buying/selling, audience measurement, ad deployment and tracking, etc.

SMAAC's subgroups have been meeting and will report their findings and next steps in July to the Steering Committee. The Council will hold a general membership meeting on September 12. New members are asked to sign-up for a subgroup by July 24. The subgroups are addressing the priority areas of audience measurement, effective ad models, and ad serving.

The Council launched SMAAC.net to post updates and other information. The site will eventually evolve from a bulletin board into a communication tool for members.

Bob Meyrowitz, President and CEO of eYada.com, SMAAC's sponsor, said "it is because we have chosen to be very specific and, in fact, narrow in our focus, that we have generated such interest among the key players in this industry." Members represent a cross-section of advertising disciplines, including corporate marketers, interactive ad agencies, and traditional ad agencies.

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