1. Ruth Ayres from Harte-Hanks
    10 hours ago re: Once More Into The Brief, Don Draper by Barbara Lippert (Mad Blog - May 28)

    I'm with George Parker on "Snow Plow". It is the perfect ad.

  2. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    11 hours ago re: Consumers Share Log-Ins For OTT Services, Slice Into Revenue by Daisy Whitney (Video Insider - May 28)

    A landlord can restrict the number of people living in the unit. Some cities/townships have a square foot amount per person living in a house/unit so that there are not 5 families living in a 3 bedroom house. A car rental can limit the number of drivers or you pay more. Rentals can have restrictions. Buy the DVD and lend it out to as many people as you wish. Don't be surprised when it happens.

  3. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    11 hours ago re: Once More Into The Brief, Don Draper by Barbara Lippert (Mad Blog - May 28)

    Let's not forget Clara Peller asking, "Where's the beef?" in that famous Wendy's commercial, guys.

  4. Lydia Sugarman from Venntive
    Yesterday, 8:15 PM re: 'I'm Mad as Hell...': My Top Email Marketing Pet Peeves by Loren McDonald (Email Insider Europe - May 29)

    I'm right there with you! I just tweeted yesterday via @Venntive that using Re: and Forwarad: is poor marketing strategy. Just alienates and disrespects the very people who actually opted in to hear from you. And, yes! Amen, brother! Those small greyed out footers can backfire badly. Has anyone done a study on people using the Spam button in lieu of searching for the disguised Unsubscribe link?

    Outdated unsubscribe processes are also annoying. Since what year in the last millennium has it taken 10 days to be removed from a database? Or, why do I have to log in and go through a full page form to "update my subscription choices?" Oh, really? Guess I'll just click that spam button instead.

    Another practice that isn't yet obvious is the practice of "growth hackers" of scraping email addresses to build lists for their clients. This is actually a common practice by the growth hackers who work with the startups of one high-profile Silicon Valley incubator. This is a ticking time bomb for brand new ventures.

    Guess I'm cranky and curmudgeonly at this point, too.

    As a solution provider, our standard email templates don't allow our users to "hide" unsubscribe information. But, shady practices that generate a lot of spam complaints can lead to our terminating their accounts, with associated fines and locked accounts. High unsubscribe and bounce rates can not only negatively affect our IP addresses, they negatively reflect against the customer's domain and email addresses. This, in turn, impacts their deliverability, not to mention their reputation.

  5. Cynthia Amorese from JAL Enterprises NY
    Yesterday, 7:36 PM re: Once More Into The Brief, Don Draper by Barbara Lippert (Mad Blog - May 28)

    A car ad is one of my favorites, too -- the original Nissan commercial with G.I. Joe and Barbie.

  6. George Parker from Parker Consultants
    Yesterday, 6:47 PM re: Once More Into The Brief, Don Draper by Barbara Lippert (Mad Blog - May 28)

    Oh... And by the way... Proof that Weiner never worked in the ad biz... The Coke spot was not the world's greatest TV spot... That accolade belongs to the VW "Snow Plow" commercial.

  7. George Parker from Parker Consultants
    Yesterday, 6:09 PM re: Once More Into The Brief, Don Draper by Barbara Lippert (Mad Blog - May 28)

    Barbara... Barbara... You have to accept, its over. There will be no more "Mad Men." Yes, you have promised us the ultimate recap next week... But why do I have this nagging feeling that there might be an uber-recap followed by an uber-uber recap? You can get confidential help on this infatuation... I promise not to blow this all over AdScam... For a reasonable fee. I can recomend experts. Then you can assume the "Chair of Mad Man Studies" at Columbia University with my blessing. What more could you ask? Never forget Don Draper is not real... I am...
    Cheers/George "AdScam" Parker

  8. David Mountain from Marketing and Advertising Direction
    Yesterday, 4:25 PM re: Future TV Ads Will Be Ultimate Enabler Of Impulse Shoppers by Rick Herman (Video Insider - May 29)

    Can we, please, stop citing CTR as a relevant metric? I understand the primal appeal, but if this industry is ever going to achieve parity with offline and drain the fraud swamp, we've got to be smarter than that. Cite ROI, or revenue lift in A/B tests, or view-through or anything, really, rather than See Ad Click Ad. It benefits no legitimate shareholder.

  9. James Nail from Forrester Research
    Yesterday, 4:12 PM re: Future TV Ads Will Be Ultimate Enabler Of Impulse Shoppers by Rick Herman (Video Insider - May 29)

    I'll finally be able to buy Jennifer Aniston's sweater!!

  10. Chuck Martin from Chuck Martin
    Yesterday, 2:21 PM re: Android Pay & Alignment in Mobile Payments by Chuck Martin (MobileShopTalk - May 29)

    Right, Leonard, and deals, along with a seamless experience.

  11. Leonard Zachary from EquityStep
    Yesterday, 1:16 PM re: Android Pay & Alignment in Mobile Payments by Chuck Martin (MobileShopTalk - May 29)

    Direct linkage to Loyalty Rewards will be an enabler. People like Free.

  12. Leonard Zachary from EquityStep
    Yesterday, 1:10 PM re: Useful Vs. Creepy: The Jury Is Still Out by George Simpson (Online Media Daily - May 28)

    Tracking of mobile devices and collection of volumes of data regarding the device is Creepy and drains the battery life (background usage)

  13. Leonard Zachary from EquityStep
    Yesterday, 1:07 PM re: Consumers Share Log-Ins For OTT Services, Slice Into Revenue by Daisy Whitney (Video Insider - May 28)

    Paula the refrence was to a family's cable subscription and further, the mobile OTT service. What's wronmg with sharing a Netflix account? If I rent an apartment and further, take roomates to sahre the cost, what gives????

  14. Patricia O'Connor from Non Profit
    Yesterday, 12:24 PM re: Informal Consensus Reveals Best TV Shows For Promoting Books by Adam Buckman (TVBlog - May 29)

    CBS Sunday Morning is by far my favorite show of the week.  You cannot listen and watch withough learning something new.  I was recently inspired to purchase "The Wright Brothers" by David McCullough after the segment featured the Pulitzer prize author.  Yes, I am above 49 and still read books.

  15. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    Yesterday, 11:58 AM re: With Home Address Identification, Reveelz Takes Targeting Too Far by Kaila Colbin (Online Spin - May 29)

    The direct mail piece cannot control your connected home or your connected body. "We are begging to be controlled."

  16. Ben Myers from Freelance
    Yesterday, 11:55 AM re: Can Google Close The Trust Gap With Amazon? by Rick Backus (Search Insider - May 28)

    Just to be contrarian here, I need to observe that Amazon has a serious gap of its own: the search gap.  I shop Amazon very rarely, simply because the Amazon search is useless.  I try to search for some very exacting item and Amazon gives me a laundry list of very different items.  I do not have time to scroll through them all to find what I want.  The second part of the Amazon search gap is its refusal to allow users to view search results ordered by PRICE+SHIPPING.  Why is this important?  Well, sort your Amazon search results by PRICE alone, and find the scammers who add outrageous shipping charges to outwit clueless shoppers.  It's not worth the bother to shop Amazon.  Give me eBay any time, with Alibaba's T-Mart not too shabby either.

  17. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    Yesterday, 11:41 AM re: Long Tail, Short Snout: A Twice-Sold Tale by Mitch Oscar (Audience Buying Insider - May 29)

    Interesting piece, Mitch. I agree that nobody should shun "long tail" networks because of their tiny audiences and Rentrak's ability to produce set usage ratings for such networks, due to its larger sample, gives them, at long last, a shot at capturing the buyers' attention. But I'm not sure that I would rate them above the big guys when prioritizing my TV selections. Experience has shown that one of the reasons why most high rated channels attain more viewers per minute is that their audiences are more, not less, loyal, while low rated channels---a few exceptions aside---are usually those with less frequent audiences.

    Also, we must remember that the vast majority of the population watches many channels---on average, about 14 per per week, 23 per month and still more over the course of a year. As a result, even if one of the "long tail" networks attains a weekly reach of 150,000 adults and an average minute viewership of 12,000, and these findings are now reportable, the chances are pretty good that the buyer has already reached these folks with his ad messages on CBS or Fox or ESPN or TNT or all of these and others as well. The "long tail" network probably adds virtually nothing to the advertiser's reach.

    While this does not mean that "long tail" networks should be ruled out, as audience duplication is a given when so many large and small channels are competing for the viewer's attention, the small fry need to come up with something more than lower CPMs to be considered---uniquely engaging content that creates a proven advantage for the advertiser, as an example. Their audience tonnage, even at lower CPMs, is simply not large enough to make buyers consider them first.

  18. Henry Blaufox from DragonSearch
    Yesterday, 11:34 AM re: In Programmatic, Less Is Now More by Tyler Loechner (RTBlog - May 29)

    The drive among ad tech vendors to be the preferred service provider, and lock in clients for long term commitments, will require the vendors to constantly innovate and enhance their systems, rapidly, accurately (few or no bugs, no omitted features,) while making the systems as easy as possible for the end users. The vendors that don't will lose clients to those that do. Welcome to the world of agile, accurate development processes and delivery that matches promises to clients.

  19. Steve Baldwin from Didit
    Yesterday, 11:25 AM re: Useful Vs. Creepy: The Jury Is Still Out by George Simpson (Online Media Daily - May 28)

    I always try to visit ebay at least once a day and look for something that I'm never going to buy (e.g. a $30,000 analog audio console that's completely useless today). Doing this will prompt an image of this same console to follow me around all day. Sometimes I actually break into laughter when the image faithfully appears. Be creative people -- you can screw up all this profiling with just a random visit or two to a site you don't belong at or by viewing a product that screws up the whole elaborate marketing bucket you've been put in at such great cost and effort.

  20. Henry Blaufox from DragonSearch
    Yesterday, 11:07 AM re: With Home Address Identification, Reveelz Takes Targeting Too Far by Kaila Colbin (Online Spin - May 29)

    Consumer marketing based on home address has been used for decades - mail list rentals, subscriber lists, the ubiquitous "bingo cards" of years past through which one "opted in" by taking the time to identify preferences for other products, hobbies and so on when you bought something (volunteering that information was the forerunner to opt-in.) Zip code targeting using the census demo data is also a version of this.

    The difference now is the sheer volume of data available, and speed at which it can be more precisely targeted at relatively low cost. As for access to sensitive data like SSN and financial information, that sort of thing can and should be protected by law. I would also note that the example Ms. Colbin gives about "willingness to rack up more credit card debt" (not to mention whether you are likely to handle it) has been analyzed for decades by the banks andd other card issuers. That is why the offesr are sent in the first place - credit rating plus zip code demo data plus, in the case of your bank, first party data about your financial history.

    Is it the speed at which Reveelz can sift data that causes some unease?

  21. George Simpson from George H. Simpson Communications
    Yesterday, 10:34 AM re: Useful Vs. Creepy: The Jury Is Still Out by George Simpson (Online Media Daily - May 28)

    http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/250870/with-home-address-identification-reveelz-takes-ta.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=bottom&utm_campaign=83234

  22. David Mountain from Marketing and Advertising Direction
    Yesterday, 9:59 AM re: Useful Vs. Creepy: The Jury Is Still Out by George Simpson (Online Media Daily - May 28)

    Why is it that no one is ever offended by the current dystopia of untargeted ads and monumental waste, but has to become freaked out about The Dark Targeted Future?

    Imagine, for just a moment, a world where an automotive manufacturer only send ads to the people who are right for the product, and you get to miss out on, say, a billion truck ads. Now, imagine what that might do to the sticker price for people who actually buy trucks, Then, multiply that out through all of the different consumer categories.

    Think about a world in which you don't only see the right ad at the right time, but a dramatic decrease in seeing the wrong ads all of the rest of the time. Isn't that a nicer world, for everyone but companies that are benefitting from the current waste? And why is blocking that something to be encouraged?

  23. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    Yesterday, 9:53 AM re: Programmatic TV Budgets To Rise From 4% To 17% By 2019 by Tyler Loechner (Real-Time Daily - May 28)

    As I understood it, the whole idea of "programmatic", as applied to digital, was that the computers scanned a myriad of "avails"---far more than any human could do---- in "real time" and found the most cost efficient way to accumulate target audience "impresions", selecting their delivery exactly when the advertiser desired. The Magna definition of TV programmatic buying seems rather far removed from this ideal, especially as it appears to blend local with national while the majority of the sellers as well as their "audience" inventory are not at play.

    It seems to me that "TV programmatic" has been redefined to represent computer assisted, but not driven, buying, with humans making all of the actual decisions, which is a far cry from the "optimal" process that really obtains the maximum possible  cost efficiencies on a totally "objective" basis. In short, it's not the same thing as the digital version and consequently, it's probably not a "revolutionary" process or a great leap forward.