1. Maarten Albarda from Flock Associates (USA)
    16 minutes ago re: A New Way to Determine Corporate Value by by Gord Hotchkiss, Featured Contributor (Online Spin - Feb. 09)

    ...or we go with comedienne Chelsea Peretti's approach, as she presented during the Crunchies this week:

    SHAHANI: And on the quixotic tech economy in which startups are valued at hundreds of millions of dollars but have zero revenue to speak of, Peretti suggested nixing every award category and creating a new one.
     
    PERETTI: And it should be called viable business, and the nominees should be Apple, Amazon, Google, Facebook.
     
    SHAHANI: The awards did follow, and with them, a kind of mixed message. On the one hand, locals who were eager to demonstrate were not just an old boy's club. So when Slack, the office networking app, won for fastest rising startup, they sent four women of color, all engineers, onstage to accept.
     
    (APPLAUSE)
     
    SHAHANI: On the other hand, the usual suspects kept getting nominated. Take best mobile app - even though we're at a historical moment in which apps are being created around the world to deliver medical care or education, the award went to a messaging service, Facebook's. 

    Link to complete coverage here: http://www.npr.org/2016/02/09/466108343/9th-annual-crunchies-honors-silicon-valley-movers-and-shakers


  2. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    28 minutes ago re: Visible Measures Makes A Bold Ad Guarantee by by P.J. Bednarski, Staff Writer (VidBlog - Feb. 09)

    Sound ? Not sound.

  3. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    31 minutes ago re: Time To Block The Blockers -- What Have You Got To Lose? by by Sean Hargrave, Staff Writer (London Blog - Feb. 09)

    What do you think the tipping point of what readers would accumulatively pay - let's say monthly -  for subscriptions to all they sites they visit without ads ? 

  4. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    43 minutes ago re: Visible Measures Makes A Bold Ad Guarantee by by P.J. Bednarski, Staff Writer (VidBlog - Feb. 09)

    Hmmm. Sounds interesting. I wonder if they plan to "document" the added value by measuring the impact on ad recall and message registration for video commercials under this definition of "visibility" relative to the proposed norm---such as the IAB "standard"?

  5. Kenny Kurtz from creative license
    47 minutes ago re: The Joy Of Stupid by by Bob Garfield, Columnist (Garfield at Large - Jan. 25)

    You seem to be speaking out of both sides of your mouth, Bob. Which, unfortunately (or fortunately), will make it difficult to concurrently quaff down your favorite soda unless you go with a thin straw right down the middle.

    You write "The reason Big Soda isn’t regulated is that what it sells is a confection which, when reasonably consumed, is tasty, refreshing and often positively delightful."

    You then go on to lambaste Pepsi and Coke for associating what you yourself describe as

    "tasty, refreshing and positively delightful" with "joy" and "happiness."

    In what parallel universe are things that are tasty, refreshing, and positively delightful incapable of bringing some measure of joy, or happiness?

    Considering that in this very difficult, and very dangerous world that we live in, the quest for a little joy and happiness is relentless (probabaly moreso than Lexus's ongoing pursuit for perfection)... the idea that it is a lie to present a product that is unequivocally tasty, refreshing, and positively delightful (that provides a bit of a "speed" buzz too for a sense of "well-being") as capable of providing a bit of joy, or happiness is silly.

  6. Steve Beverly from Union Broadcasting System
    62 minutes ago re: Super Bowl Athlete Shout-Outs: Live TV With No Script -- Or Net by by Wayne Friedman, Staff Writer (TV Watch - Feb. 09)

    For a minute, I thought Peyton was going to start a trend of copying NASCAR drivers who thank every sponsor in rote memory after winning a race.  Perhaps indeed he has.

  7. Craig Mcdaniel from Sweepstakes Today LLC
    96 minutes ago re: Time To Block The Blockers -- What Have You Got To Lose? by by Sean Hargrave, Staff Writer (London Blog - Feb. 09)

    As a publisher with banners ads, I would demand payment from Wired for being paid to block ads on the website without my permission.  The principal is the same as when you when you hear in a NFL game that copy or illegal use of this transmission is strictly prohibited. Wired, when they start to charge a fee to block ads on www.sweepstakestoday.com, are doing so without my permission. Wired is in effect buying my ad locations by accepting money. Last, I will not pay blackmail money either to Wired to have my ads shown. Wired, don’t even think about it. You don’t have enough money to pay damages and attorney fees.

    I would like to hear from the attorneys that follow this story.

  8. Robert Sacks from Precision Media Group
    97 minutes ago re: Time To Block The Blockers -- What Have You Got To Lose? by by Sean Hargrave, Staff Writer (London Blog - Feb. 09)

    I agree but only to a point. I think ratebase years ago has helped destroy our ability to appreciate our true and core business. That business isn’t/wasn’t to appeal to advertisers but rather to the paying reader. The reader should have been carrying the load a long time ago.

    We could have done this and we didn’t. We took the easy way. Now we are back pedaling trying to reach and retrain the reader. DUH! Quality content is worth paying for and that is what most quality readers do. Let’s get rid of the fluff and deliver what is worth charging for. Smaller audiences and are lucrative and worth having. 
    BoSacks
    -30-

  9. Chuck Martin from Chuck Martin
    over 1 hour ago re: Driverless Car Can Meet You In The Driveway by by Chuck Martin, Staff Writer (Connected Thinking - Feb. 08)

    Thanks for sharing all your thoughts on this, Mark. And great point abot that service engine light (whatever the "engine" of the future is)

  10. R MARK REASBECK from www.USAonly.US
    2 hours ago re: Driverless Car Can Meet You In The Driveway by by Chuck Martin, Staff Writer (Connected Thinking - Feb. 08)

    I've hung back long enough.  How pathetic is your life that you can't get your car from a parking tower or grocery store parking lot. You just want the prestige of people watching you watch your car pull up by itself.   What about the the mom with a couple of kids and one of those 4  x 4 baby strollers navigating  a parking lot  and she sees a car coming down the aisle UNMANNED??  Everyone of them would need their diapers changed.  Look around, Everybody's 40 pounds overweight , go get your dang car, walk up the parking tower steps  and stop with this technology is "best" for us.
    I'll give you the warning and safety features,  help with warning of our surroundings will help everyone.  I've said this already, if you can't be bothered with the responsibility, and enjoyment of driving, live like a New York City resident and use public transportation.  Just remember 1-$40-50 car ride includes their gas, their insurance, tires.......................etc and you're free to facebook  to your heart's content  in the back seat and never once have to worry about who pulled up to the 4-way stop.  The funny thing will be when we have driverless cabs driving around a driverless passenger FOR MONEY!!  I'll bet the "Service Engine Soon" light will still be on................UNMANNED!!

  11. Thomas Siebert from BENEVOLENT PROPAGANDA
    2 hours ago re: Demented by by Bob Garfield, Columnist (Garfield at Large - Feb. 08)

    Didn't get the creepy Alzheimer's vibe, but I've never known anyone well who's had it. I found the ad manipulative and sentimental, over-rated. But I don't think I would've said anything about it being offensive if i was in the focus group. I might agree with others once they brought it up, though.

    Overall, found Super Duper Sunday Shilling less bad than many years, honestly, though few examples of stellar work.

  12. Gordon Hotchkiss from Out of My Gord Consulting
    2 hours ago re: A New Way to Determine Corporate Value by by Gord Hotchkiss, Featured Contributor (Online Spin - Feb. 09)

    Rick - thanks for your thoughtful comments. You should have access to the paper. It's a free download.

  13. Nina Lentini from MediaPost Communications
    2 hours ago re: Bernie's Artful Smear by by Philip Rosenstein, Staff Writer (Red, White & Blog - Feb. 09)

    Thanks, Philip, for providing an objective look at the art of the smear. I'm certainly curious to see how this unfolds.

  14. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    2 hours ago re: Programmatic TV's Here -- But More Education And Alignment Are Needed by by Tobi Elkin, Staff Writer (RTBlog - Feb. 09)

    To make "programmatic" buying work for traditional TV ad sellers---the broadcast networks, national syndicators, national cable channels and TV stations----you must not only  "educate" these people about how such systems work but also show them how allowing buyers to cherrypick from among their content schedules with the main driver being the lowest target group CPM is going to increase their ad revenue yields. I'm afraid that this may be a "bridge too far". As for the prediction that TV programmatic buying will hit 3% this year---which is a lot lower than many of the crazy predictions we saw last year---the question remains, how many of these "buys" actually involve an evaluation of all---or most---reasonable alternatives, rather than the offers from a single vendor? I suspect that the answer is---not many. So are we talking about pure "programmatic" computer-to-computer transactions or, merely, computer-assisted buys actually made by humans?

  15. Rick Monihan from None
    3 hours ago re: A New Way to Determine Corporate Value by by Gord Hotchkiss, Featured Contributor (Online Spin - Feb. 09)

    It's my experience that at most of the companies I've worked for, the customer was always the central focus.  However, what wasn't always a subject of focus were some of the other points you made.  For example, all markets are subject to disruption.  This was part of what Schumpeter called the "perennial gale of creative destruction."
    In addition, the concept of perfect predictability implies a static environment, or at least one with few moving and very knowable parts.  In any business, that is a rarity.  In that case, I'd rely more on Hayek's discussion of the "Pretense of Knowledge."  Assuming you know everything you need to know about your business at any point in time is an opening for disruption to undermine your position.

    Customer value can vary through the life cycle of a business, and the customers themselves.  Unfortunately, I don't have access to the paper cited, though I'd be interested in reading it.  That said, I know that my value as a customer to the New York Times was much higher as a student (when it was required reading for a class, and I had a potential to be a lifetime subscriber) than it was when I was 35 and deciding that it no longer spoke to me and my interests, and digital had become more available and affordable.

    Amazon, as a disruptive force, places a very high value on each customer.  That value is probably different at varying points of Amazon's life cycle.  Knowing where your company is in its life cycle, and how your customers impact you at that point in time is critical.  Will print's history play a strong role in helping cable companies adapt to the realities faced in a world which is moving away from subscriptions?


  16. Brent Green from Brent Green & Associates, Inc.
    3 hours ago re: Demented by by Bob Garfield, Columnist (Garfield at Large - Feb. 08)

    Advertising is science; advertising is art. Advertising reflects and shapes culture, which is inordinately the collision of disparate forces.

    From the science perspective, this ad demonstrates the potential of generational marketing: in this case, Baby Boomer male nostalgia about the Apollo Missions as glorified in Tom Wolfe's "The Right Stuff." I suspect that the primary target audience for this message -- those who have both the means and motivations to buy this car or other, more affordable Audi models -- is Baby Boomer men, the same segment likely to be experiencing the decline of fathers who are becoming the "old-old."  The secondary target is probably Generation X men, as portrayed by the son in the Commander ad.

    According to recent Pew research, Boomers have the highest degree of generational identification among all living generations: 79 percent. This means that a large majority of television viewers in the target audience can be collectively reached by connecting a brand to uplifting nostalgic imagery. David Bowie's recent death does not now render his songs as death metaphors. That's as ridiculous as associating death with a Frank Sinatra or Elvis Presley sound bed in an ad. Actually, Bowie’s recent death could make the sound bed less background and more foreground, with a positive boost to message awareness and reception.

    The majority of Super Bowl ads irritate me, Bob, from the puerile and inane creative conceptions conceived mostly for adolescent mentalities, to more adult ads for diarrhea and erectile dysfunction medications. My personal reactions have little to do with my professional assessments of how well and creatively an ad potentially taps into the collective psyche of an intended target, especially from a generational marketing perspective, the focus of my writing and speaking for the last twelve years.

    None of us commenters -- including you -- will know the true measured results of this ad, so all comments -- including yours -- are merely artistic opinions. We will not know data for pre and post brand awareness, brand image associations, top-of-mind awareness, propensity to buy, and actual vehicle sales, pre and post this ad campaign. We will not have any hard data for the true balance of favorable versus unfavorable consumer reactions expressed in social media.

    I have always thought of Barbara Lippert and you as my favorite advertising opinion leaders -- the best in the business -- but I cannot agree with your harshness and single dimension critiques of this Audi ad. And that's my opinion.

  17. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    4 hours ago re: Das Auto? Nein. Das Volk by by Karl Greenberg, Staff Writer (Marketing: Automotive - Feb. 09)

    It is the what else lack of trust factor. When a company does something illegal/immoral for financial gain only, what else would they do. All of the profiteers who knew/should have known must divest themselves completely from the company for VW to move on and the trust to return.

  18. Chuck Martin from Chuck Martin
    4 hours ago re: Driverless Car Can Meet You In The Driveway by by Chuck Martin, Staff Writer (Connected Thinking - Feb. 08)

    But, at least in this case Bob, the car owner continues to own and drive the car, just that some features, such as tight parking, are automated.

  19. Bob Gordon from The Auto Channel
    4 hours ago re: Driverless Car Can Meet You In The Driveway by by Chuck Martin, Staff Writer (Connected Thinking - Feb. 08)

    driverless means no one has to own a car, driverless at some point reasults in big brother approving or disapproving where you want to go..driverless is a fairy tale eminating from suilicon valley... hey boys we've f---ed up the adverting biz cars are next.

  20. Bob Gordon from The Auto Channel
    4 hours ago re: Driverless Car Can Meet You In The Driveway by by Chuck Martin, Staff Writer (Connected Thinking - Feb. 08)

    Cal a Taxi... simpler and cheaper... no insurance, no payments and no worries...

  21. Bob Gordon from The Auto Channel
    4 hours ago re: AOL's Tim Armstrong Reportedly Reaching Out To Yahoo by by Laurie Sullivan (Search Marketing Daily - Feb. 08)

    Judge Green where are you when we need you???

  22. Bob Gordon from The Auto Channel
    4 hours ago re: 'Wired' To Ad-Block Users: Turn It Off Or Subscribe by by Felicia Greiff (Real-Time Daily - Feb. 08)

    No Ads, No Editorial Content, No Democracy.. oh well ...blame the billions of useless impressions for diminishing the value of banners in the eyes of the advertisers and their digital agency experts. In the basement rates force publishers to allow their site to look like an ad covered  NASCAR vehicle. If there was respect for the value of our hard earned audiences we could eliminate 75% of the ads and make everyone happy (except those sited generating those billion of worthless impressions). Relevant ads delivered as a just in time message are welcomed by readers.  

  23. Henry Blaufox from DragonSearch
    4 hours ago re: Wall Street Analyst Wieser Upgrades IPG To 'Buy' Rating by by Steve McClellan (MAD - Feb. 08)

    Has the long heralded shift by IPG to derive fifty percent plus of media spend (and resulting revenue) via programmatic been successfully completed? Original plans by the holding company leadership called for it to be done by end of 2015 for the US, then on to other regions. Haven't heard or seen much lately on this. It would seem to me that if IPG intends to take on more attributes of a marketing systems and data consultancy, success meeting their programmatic targets are a success metric.