1. Tobin Trevarthen from Sparkpr
    8 hours ago re: The Day The Music Died: R.I.P., Prince by by Cory Treffiletti, Featured Contributor (Online Spin - April 28)

    He defined "the medium is the message".

  2. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    9 hours ago re: Dumb Idea Of The Week: 'Match Game' With Alec Baldwin by by Adam Buckman, Featured Columnist (TVBlog - April 29)

    Promotion is including with tis decision. The "stars" get to promote their projects so some of the costs are written off in the promotional budget for the project which makes it even cheaper to produce with loads of inside jokes to appease the "stars". Pharmas and life insurance companies will be on their doorstep.

  3. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    9 hours ago re: Google, Amazon and Netflix Are A New Breed Of Monopoly; Same As The Old Breed by by Kaila Colbin, Featured Contributor (Online Spin - April 29)

    When the results are finally available, Netflix will be found to have about 60% of all SVOD viewing tonnage and only 6% of all "TV" viewing. Moreover, those percentages will probably begin to drop as more sophisticated "quality content" players get into SVOD. I'm not sure that this situation really qualifies Netflix as a "monopoly". You can get similar fare---if not exactly the identical fare----from many, many sources.

  4. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    9 hours ago re: Google, Amazon and Netflix Are A New Breed Of Monopoly; Same As The Old Breed by by Kaila Colbin, Featured Contributor (Online Spin - April 29)

    Either the monopolies are forced to break up or it is back to "We are begging to be controlled." It is about putting all your marbles into one bag.

  5. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    10 hours ago re: Media Researchers' Takes On VAB's Cross-Media Metric Proposal by by Karlene Lukovitz, Staff Writer (Audience Buying Insider - April 29)

    You are right about unknown percentages of "linear TV" audiences who are not in the room during commercials, David. Although time buyers and national TV sellers use so-called commercial minute ratings as their negotiating "currency" something like 10% of the "viewers" aren't even in the room for an average commercial while others, who the system counts as "viewing", stopped watching a while ago but failed to log themselves out of the audience in their peoplemeters. An even larger segment, that remains in the room, ceases to pay attention and/or does something else during commercial breaks. Still, the peoplemeter system does require people to indicate whether they are "watching" when a show is tuned in, which allows us to have a pretty good idea who the ad viewer might be.

    Thee real problem arises when we try to measure other "platforms"---meaning digital. Here it is not such an easy matter to identify the content viewer as all we are getting---pending the development of some methodology that replicates the "people" aspect of TV's peoplemeter---is device usage, not viewing. Unless the audience signs in and qualifies itself in some manner, we do not know who is watching, let alone how attentive they might be.

    If the industry goes to a currency that accepts device/set usage as its common base, this greatly inflates the presumed audience of digital, which usually has only a single user compared to linear TV which has more than one viewer about a third of the time, Also, there is reason to question the comparability of device usage data across platforms---especially in "granular", second by second, terms. Again, this probably favors digital, unfairly over "linear TV".

    I hope that whoever makes the final decision about cross platform measurement recognizes that while device usage may be easier to obtain, it does not really give us an even playing field for comparisons across platforms. A really definitive "viewing" metric would do this.

  6. Doug Garnett from Atomic Direct
    10 hours ago re: GroupM Report Suggests It Might Be Time To Ditch The Zero In 30-Second Ads by by Tobi Elkin, Staff Writer (RTBlog - April 27)

    Agreed, Ed. The only messages the fit in 3 seconds are..well...not really "messages" but flashes of brand that hopefully help entrench the brand in the right place in the mind. That's all they can do.

  7. Tom Cunniff from Tom Cunniff
    11 hours ago re: How Do The TV Guys Think About Programmatic? by by Tobi Elkin, Staff Writer (RTBlog - April 28)

    The top players in the cable/network/etc ecosystem have strong incentives not to move to programmatic, but IMO it's an inevitability.

    And to Benjamin Glatt's question re: "Where can units within Game of Thrones be bought?" the answer today is of course nowhere. But there's absolutely a market for those units -- and really not much from a technical POV preventing HBO from creating exactly that kind of offering whenever they decide that's a good idea.

  8. David Wiesenfeld from Tru Optik
    Yesterday, 3:48 PM re: Media Researchers' Takes On VAB's Cross-Media Metric Proposal by by Karlene Lukovitz, Staff Writer (Audience Buying Insider - April 29)

    Like the "avg audience per minute" concept in general, though it almost certainly favors linear TV, which is more likely to be on with no one in the room (or no one paying attention) than time-shifted or on-demand TV.

  9. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    Yesterday, 3:26 PM re: Hey Agencies, Millennials Don't Give A Crap About Your Celebrity Endorsement Campaigns by by Richard Whitman, Columnist (Mediapsssst - April 28)

    Hey, Anglyn, you go right ahead and "sell" millennials whatever you want to, however that's not going to change the world for the better, I'm afraid. As for the "average product", this is simple math. To listen to all of the bluff and bluster about millennials you would think that they are the only ones that marketers should care about. My point is that older consumers---those over 34 years of age-- represent, by far, the largest share of purchases for most products or services. If you aren't aware of that what planet do you reside on?  By the way, I assume that you are a big fan of the old sci-fi movie "Logan's Run". The organizers of that futuristic city sold their millennials on lots of good ideas didn't they----until the youngsters finally wised up and saw that oldsters can exist. Have a great weekend.

  10. Kenny Kurtz from creative license
    Yesterday, 2:39 PM re: Dumb Idea Of The Week: 'Match Game' With Alec Baldwin by by Adam Buckman, Featured Columnist (TVBlog - April 29)

    Rayburn, in fact, was known to have "schweaty balls."

    I can see Baldwin doing a fun, and funny rip-off of ol' Gene.

  11. Kenny Kurtz from creative license
    Yesterday, 2:36 PM re: Dumb Idea Of The Week: 'Match Game' With Alec Baldwin by by Adam Buckman, Featured Columnist (TVBlog - April 29)

    Buckman writes...

    Game shows are supposed to be fun. So who on Earth came up with the idea of hiring wet blanket Alec Baldwin to host a new version of “Match Game?”

    I'm thinking that the answer to "who on earth came up with that idea" is somebody bright, with their finger on the pulse of current demographics.

    I cannot forget my dad's appearance on "The Match Game" in the mid-70's, nor the enjoyment I took out of that throughout my high school years. In this day, and time, and with the aging of America... I can see where a simple premise like that of The Match Game might resonate in our convoluted, congested, and conflicted society of ours.

    And I will certainly howl when Alec asks contestants to write their "match" for "schweaty balls."


  12. Robb Martin from Mile High Services
    Yesterday, 2:21 PM re: Super Wednesday: Cruz Picks Fiorina, Trump Talks Foreign Policy, Sanders Starts To Wind Down by by Philip Rosenstein, Staff Writer (Red, White & Blog - April 28)

    Wow! What a brillant stategy Cruz is pursuring.  Another brick in the wall for the total distruction of the Republican party!

  13. Rick Thomas from MediaRich Marketing
    Yesterday, 1:50 PM re: Dumb Idea Of The Week: 'Match Game' With Alec Baldwin by by Adam Buckman, Featured Columnist (TVBlog - April 29)

    On the same page with Chuck. If it is anywhere near as successful as Celebrity Family Feud was for the network then it's a winner because these shows are really cheap to produce. Celebrity Family Feud did 8 million total viewers. How many prime time shows would like to have that kind of number? Can ABC sales guys and gals sell that kind of rating? For a Sunday show? I think so. Now take out production costs and you're making money.

    Isn't that the end game no pun intended? Making money from low cost production and high ratings leading to increased spot costs is that game. Throw in the Sunday Fun & Games concept and you have a great package to sell advertisers during the slow summer period. ABC is smart by not throwing out the summer viewing period but trying to now make money on a few old time game shows.

    Smart. This is not about Alec Baldwin. This is about making money. Might as well try it to see if it works and if it doesn't well shows get canceled all the time. Let's do a re-make of The Dating Game next summer. Nothing wrong with trying something old to see if there’s success.

  14. Chuck Lantz from 2007ac.com, 2013ac.com network
    Yesterday, 12:59 PM re: Dumb Idea Of The Week: 'Match Game' With Alec Baldwin by by Adam Buckman, Featured Columnist (TVBlog - April 29)

    I've got an idea. Why don't we wait until the first show actually airs before trashing it?  I know that's a novel approach, but what the hell, ... it's worth a shot, right?

    And anyone who lived in the Los Angeles area way back when Regis Philbin was struggling through the first quarter of his career remembers that even mentioning his name was considered funny as hell.  That was before he took off and made zillions. 

  15. Henry Blaufox from DragonSearch
    Yesterday, 12:47 PM re: What Do Time Inc. And Its Viant Have To Tell Us? by by John Motavalli, Columnist (Programmatic Insider - April 27)

    Yup.

  16. John Motavalli from Freelance
    Yesterday, 12:42 PM re: What Do Time Inc. And Its Viant Have To Tell Us? by by John Motavalli, Columnist (Programmatic Insider - April 27)

    One other thing, I notice when reading Google's pitches to advertisers, they keep emphasizing traffic, not so much demographic data. Sure, they lead in that, but right now, their pitch is more on how big they are, and how small the rest of the pack is in comparison. I think that's notable, and could be part of the angst everyone is feeling in dealing with & against them.

  17. John Motavalli from Freelance
    Yesterday, 12:39 PM re: What Do Time Inc. And Its Viant Have To Tell Us? by by John Motavalli, Columnist (Programmatic Insider - April 27)

    That's' all right, Henry, I had a long and checkered career. I worked for Hachette, Rodale, Hearst, Bechtel, you name it. I can't remember doing anything for Time Inc., but who knows?

  18. Anglyn Hays from Columbia Law School
    Yesterday, 12:30 PM re: Hey Agencies, Millennials Don't Give A Crap About Your Celebrity Endorsement Campaigns by by Richard Whitman, Columnist (Mediapsssst - April 28)

    Failing to figure out those "precious" millennials is to sacrifice the only market we have coming to us besides their children, sir.  You aren't comfortable with the generalization that celebrity does not fool the young like it did the old, but snidely believe the generalization that since the young only buy 30% of the "average product" (whatever that could be? are you thinking widgets like someone 100 years old???).  The world has changed and I plan to sell to it.  If that's not your plan, enjoy your retirement.

  19. Augustine Fou from Marketing Science Consulting Group, Inc.
    Yesterday, 11:42 AM re: How Ad Fraud, Ad Blocking And Viewability Are Interrelated by by Augustine Fou (MediaDailyNews - April 29)

    Hi Ed, yes .. or they can additionally use services like Distil Networks, Incapsula, and Akamai to detect bots and scrub them out even before they hit the website. 

  20. Henry Blaufox from DragonSearch
    Yesterday, 11:13 AM re: Why Booming Ad Tech M&A Is Bad News For IPOs by by Bill Wise (Real-Time Daily - April 29)

    I suppose Bill Wise is well positioned to state "there’s not much room left for scrappy startups to take on the industry goliaths." He should know, having guided MediaBank to acquisition by DDS to creat MediaOcean. Then, the combined company leadership chose acquisition by a PE firm rather than a long anticipated IPO. Apparently that provided better returns and likelihood of ongoing business success than they could have achieved vai an IPO.

  21. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    Yesterday, 11:00 AM re: New Meaning To Glint In Your Eye by by George Simpson, Featured Contributor (MediaDailyNews - April 29)

    "We are begging to be controlled." In Georgia (no doubt other places, too) there was a law that did not pass at the time to enforce going to church on Sundays. Having a particular dominionist and followers barking at the doors of extreme power and Big Brother tracking allowed to be legal, the Village of the Damned is on our heels. 

  22. Henry Blaufox from DragonSearch
    Yesterday, 10:53 AM re: What Do Time Inc. And Its Viant Have To Tell Us? by by John Motavalli, Columnist (Programmatic Insider - April 27)

    correcting one error on my earlier comment to John, referring to him as a Time alumnus - my mistake, as his piece makes clear. I lost track of the detail after a few days. Sorry, John.

  23. Jane Farrell from Freelance
    Yesterday, 10:53 AM re: It's Complicated: Playing The 'Girls' Card by by Barbara Lippert, Featured Columnist (Mad Blog - April 29)

    Great column as always, Barbara. Dunhan is not only a creative force, she's a brave one - persisting, as Hillary Clinton has done and continues to do, in the face of so much vitriol.