Google Keeps Brands, Marketers 'Inside Search'

MagGlass-Search

Google announced the launch of an official search blog Thursday, sending a message to marketers and those searching for content on the importance of search engine marketing and search activities across its portfolio of Web sites.

The tech giant rolled out Inside Search to help brands, marketers and consumers find frequent updates on the nuances of search and its engineering team. This is part of Google's ongoing effort to keep users informed.

Previously, Google posted information on search features and improvements on the official Google blog and Webmaster Central. Now, the topic will have its own space. "We have more engineers working on search than any other product, and each one of us has stories to tell," writes Amit Singhal, Google Fellow.

Search engine marketing and the data that comes from the medium continues to grow in importance. Companies utilizing display ads use the data to help target and remarket products to consumers. The Search Engine Marketing Professional Organization and data firm Econsultancy released a report early this year that estimates companies will spend $19.3 billion in 2011 -- up 16%.

The uptick will be spurred on by local search and mobile. BIA/Kelsey forecasts local search advertising revenue will reach $8.2 billion by 2015, up from $5.1 billion in 2010.

 

Tags: google, ppc, search, sem, seo
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1 comment about "Google Keeps Brands, Marketers 'Inside Search'".
  1. Chris Nielsen from Domain Incubation , May 23, 2011 at 9:40 a.m.

    I wonder what kind of message they are sending to marketers when they pick a name for something, yet are unable or unwilling to secure a domain name that secures the name and concept? Using a blogspot subdomain is fine for personal blogs, but wouldn't getting something like InsideSearch.com reinforce the idea that the topic and brand are important?

    I find this disturnbing because I have thought about Google as being very smart. Yet I have seen this situation several times where they set something up but don;t own the domain name that users natually will try to find out where something is located. I really don't understand what I think is a big lapse in marketing savvy.