Up Close And Social: Adobe To Spotlight Emerging Artists

by , Jan 22, 2014, 9:38 AM
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Photographers, artists and graphic designers are regular users of Adobe Creative Cloud programs, particularly Photoshop and Illustrator. But mass awareness of these projects is largely nonexistent.

Now, Adobe and its creative ad agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners are introducing a number of these artists and their respective works with a new marketing campaign: “The New Creatives Are Here.”

"The point is to show Adobe’s interest and support of creatives everywhere, whether they’re independent hobbyists, students, working at an ad agency, or running their own design firm," says Will Elliott, creative director, Goodby Silverstein & Partners. "Our strategy is to find creatives who are doing incredible things with Adobe Creative Cloud and celebrate them by putting them and their work in front of as many people as possible."

This week, seven emerging artists, including Vault49, Joshua Davis and Sonia Dearling, are featured across all Adobe social media channels under the "The New Creatives Are Here" banner.

Each day, a new artist portfolio spotlights selected work, thoughts from the artist on creativity and their profiles on the client’s cloud community Adobe Behance.

"This is what makes Adobe’s effort so unique," says Elliott. "Every day, over 100 of their social channels—an audience of over 16 million people—will be working in-sync to celebrate one new creative. That’s across Facebook pages, Twitter feeds, Instagram, Pinterest, Vine, Google+, Tumblr, even LinkedIn will be working to show a single artist’s work each day."

The campaign will extend through 2014. After the initial weeklong kickoff, one new artist will be showcased across Adobe's social network footprint every Friday throughout the year.

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