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Melanie Shreffler

Member since June 2006 Contact Melanie

Melanie is a unique combination of trend expert, writer, and researcher with a passion for following youth culture and consumers' ever-changing media habits. As Editorial Director at Noise, she is a contributor to the Cassandra Report and Cassandra Daily.

Articles by Melanie All articles by Melanie

  • Think Globally, Act Socially in Engage:Teens on 10/16/2014

    As teens, Millennials were very cause-minded, bringing issues such as recycling, gay rights, and animal welfare to the forefront. Today, teens around the globe are carrying on the tradition of youth inciting social action by calling attention to a fresh set of issues including climate change, the unequal distribution of wealth, and gender equality. But they're approaching these problems with unique perspectives as truly global citizens who are also highly confident about their ability to effect change worldwide.

  • The Social Star in Engage:Teens on 09/18/2014

    As teens are changing their media habits, moving away from traditional TV viewing to spending more time with other entertainment formats-namely YouTube, Instagram, and Tumblr-their interest in traditional celebrities has waned. According to the pop-culture issue of The Cassandra Report, 14- to 18-year-olds under-index on liking to talk about celebrities with friends (34%), being inspired by celebrities (34%), and feeling that celebrities are relatable (21%). Social media personalities are filling the void; teens are turning to this new set of tastemakers, who happen to be regular teens, just like them.

  • The 'G' Word in Engage:Teens on 08/21/2014

    The term feminism may be out of fashion with teen girls, but the concept of being a strong, confident, empowered woman most certainly is not. In recent weeks, several brands have entered the conversation around how we perceive girls in today's world. They are multifaceted modern young women-simultaneously tough and feminine, savvy and pretty. Brands are showing their support by showcasing such complexities in their campaigns and forming a bond of mutual respect with their teen girl consumers.

  • Dorm Decor That Makes The Grade in Engage:Teens on 07/17/2014

    It may be the middle of summer, but kids and families are already thinking about back-to-school as brands and retailers bombard them with deals and sales. For 17- and 18-year-olds, back-to-school = off-to-college and their first foray into freedom from their helicopter parents. And their parents want to ensure their children are well set-up to succeed in college, and that means supplying them with everything from traditional school supplies to cool tech devices to a fun and functional dorm room.

  • Big Businesses Are Betting On These Entrepreneurs in Engage:Teens on 06/19/2014

    In the '90s film "Don't Tell Mom The Babysitter's Dead," a teenage character portrayed by Christina Applegate lies about her age to land a fashion gig at a company that makes school uniforms. (Spoiler alert!) She ultimately saves the company, and her boss is praised for having hired a teen to get the youth perspective. What once was a Hollywood fantasy has become reality.

  • Summer Fun & Summer Funds  in Engage:Teens on 05/15/2014

    Just over a quarter of 16-to-19 year olds (27%) had summer jobs in 2013, according to research from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, down from 45% in 2000. The employment picture for teens in 2014 doesn't look much better, but they don't necessarily mind.

  • Think Outside The Brand in Engage:Teens on 04/17/2014

    Teens' brand preferences are as fragmented as their media habits. With cool new brands popping up overnight thanks to crowd funding and venture capital and the rebirth of the small business, there's always something new to discover.

  • Lo-Fi Hits A New High  in Engage:Teens on 03/20/2014

    For years, tech companies have been striving to make highly sophisticated products that replicate or supplement the real world. But 3D-TVs have officially failed and augmented reality is still struggling to become part of our daily lives; meanwhile lo-fi is having a moment in the form of pixilated graphics and archaic web design. Teens in particular seem to be drawn to the counterculture movement (surprise, surprise).

  • Streaming Radio Killed The Music Video Star in Engage:Teens on 02/20/2014

    While there might have been a time when music television had taken a higher place than radio in teens' esteem, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction with the growth of streaming radio services. Unlike traditional radio stations (which also offer streaming), the services below offer teens customizable, on-demand listening options that they can take anywhere. There's a battle brewing among service providers to win over young listeners with free, ad-supported options, and it's a competition that marketers should watch with interest.

  • 'Dude, I Have The Internet' in Engage:Teens on 01/16/2014

    In a recent article for Rookie, the online teen magazine, young writer Hazel Cills complains about how adults (particularly men) are dismissive of teen culture and specifically teen girl fandom. How can you take a girl seriously if she's an unabashed fan of Taylor Swift and One Direction? Her complaint is the patronizing way adults "vocally criticize us for liking the things we like." Just as frustrating to Cills is the demeaning way adults respond when a teen girl expresses her adoration of an "approved" cultural touch point, such as punk rock music, with "atta girl" permission but also with skepticism of how a teen girl could even know about or relate to cultural references from before she was born. Cills's response says it all: "Dude, I have the Internet."

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