Nielsen: More TV In Homes

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For video consumers, it's not only a case of more new digital screens from new video devices, but more traditional TV screens in the home.

Nielsen says the number of TV sets in 2009 had its largest-ever year-over-year increase since 2006 -- now just under three TVs per home, 2.93 TV sets per household. In 2009, the number of TV sets averaged 2.86; 2008 was at 2.83; 2007 tallied a 2.79 average; and 2006 was at 2.73.

According to Nielsen's Television Audience Report, the number of U.S. homes with three or more TV sets is now at 55% -- an all-time high -- up from 54% of a year ago.

This seems to come at the expense of those homes with one and two sets, which have moved up. Those with two sets are now at 28%, the same versus a year ago, but declining in recent years. Those with only one TV set -- now 17% of TV homes -- have also dropped. In 2005, for example, 21% of TV homes had only one TV set.

Nielsen also notes the unusual situation that exists between people and TV sets: There are more TV sets than people in the average TV home. The number of people per TV home is at a 2.5 average.

Other results: According to Nielsenwire, which first published the TV set results, total advertising broadcast network spending was down 10% in 2009 versus the previous year, while national cable advertising grew 16%.

The report also says 34% of TV homes have a DVR, 46% are able to receive an HD signal, and less than 10% of homes receive TV programming via over-the-air signals.

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2 comments about "Nielsen: More TV In Homes".
  1. Douglas Ferguson from College of Charleston , April 29, 2010 at 12:36 p.m.

    No duh. People are buying flat screens, especially as the price plummets, and sticking their old boxy sets in spare rooms (or closets). More TVs is not the same as more viewing.

  2. John Grono from GAP Research , April 29, 2010 at 6:44 p.m.

    Douglas, the report did not purport to say that there was more viewing. It merely reports the increased penetration.

    Down here in Australia we had seen a steady rise in 3+ TV homes, then an odd thing happened. There was a plateauing and then a slight drop, with an increase in 2 TV homes. What we detected happening was that the old analogue set which had been relegated to the spare room or the attic was finally put out in the next council clean up. It will be interesting to see if you have the same thing happen.