Twitter Makes Watching TV Interactive

According to demographics for Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings, social TV has turned watching TV into an interactive experience that connects viewers in the moment with friends, content creators, stars, and likeminded (or not so likeminded) fans. The report reveals who these viewers are that are Tweeting about TV, and who’s seeing their Tweets,

36 million people sent Tweets about TV in the US in 2013

990 million Tweets were sent about TV in the US in 2013

An initial analysis of Twitter TV demographics across 273 broadcast and cable program episodes reveals three important findings, says the report:

  • First, there’s a broad age and gender distribution across programming
  • Second, there are significant differences in the age and gender profiles of Tweeters across programming types
  • Most importantly, Twitter enables TV networks and advertisers to reach audiences beyond their core demographics

Male Share Of Twitter TV Authors (Episodes With Greatest Twitter TV Reach)

Episodes with lowest share of Male Authors

  •    Broadcast Drama… 14%
  •    Broadcast Reality…19%
  •    Broadcast Comedy… 22%

Episodes with highest share of male authors

  •    Basketball… 88/90%

Share Of Twitter Authors Under 35 (Episodes With Greatest Twitter TV Reach)

Episodes with highest share of authors <35

  •    Broadcast special… 92%
  •    Cable Sports (basketball)… 92%
  •    Cable Sports (Boxing)… 91%

Episodes with lowest share of authors <35

  •    Broadcast comedy… 41%
  •    Cable sports (horse racing)… 39%
  •    Cable sports (racing)… 37%

Tweets Reach Audiences Beyond Core TV Viewers:

Broadcast drama series (episode)

  •    People sending Tweets… 14% male
  •    People seeing Tweets… 39% male

Broadcast comedy series (episode)

  •    People sending Tweets… 41% under 35
  •    People seeing Tweets… 60% under 35

People Tweeting About TV Vary By Program Type

Average Share Of Twitter TV Authors By Gender

Series

Male

Female

Reality series

35%

65%

Drama series

39

61

Comedy series

53

47

Sports events

79

21

Average Share Of Twitter TV Authors By Age

Series

Under 35

35 and Over

Comedy

63%

37%

Drama

66

34

Sports

72

28

Reality

75

25

Source: Nielsen, May 2014

In prior research, Nielsen Social found that the people who see TV-related Tweets outnumber Twitter TV Authors by a margin of 50-1. This recent analysis reveals that the Twitter TV Audience is also more demographically balanced than Twitter TV Authors.

This important finding suggests that TV advertisers and programs can complement and extend traditional TV reach through Twitter TV audiences. A program that skews older could connect with a younger audience through the reach of Tweets sent about the show, opines the report. Similarly, a program that skews female can reach a more male audience through the reach of Tweets sent about the show.

Twitter TV Authors for the episodes analyzed ranged from 12% male to 92% male. The program episode skewing oldest counted 85% of its Twitter TV Authors above the age of 35, while 98% of the Twitter Authors for the youngest-skewing program were below the age of 35. On average, the Twitter TV Authors for Sports Events skewed 79% male, while Reality programs skewed 65% female. Reality programs also had a younger mix of Twitter TV Authors: 75% were below the age of 35. Comparatively, just 63% of authors were below 35 for Comedy programs.

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3 comments about "Twitter Makes Watching TV Interactive".
  1. Edmund Singleton from Winstion Communications , June 6, 2014 at 6:31 a.m.
    The best/only time to tweet about a television show is after not during...
  2. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited , June 6, 2014 at 8:58 a.m.
    It makes you want to black out the bottom and extremely annoying proving time in and time out how stupid people are when you accidentally notice some idiocy and how many people have nothing to do.
  3. Robin Solis from synchronicity.co , June 7, 2014 at 4:07 p.m.
    Paula, were you having a stroke when you wrote that?