We Hear Boston's Blitz Media Has Closed

We've received a whisper from a tipster that Boston-based media buying shop Blitz Media has closed. The shop has been a Boston area mainstay for decades and was one of the first media-buying shops in the area. Last fall the agency parted ways with major client Wendy’s, which the shop had served for over a decade. At the time agency CEO Melissa Lea wrote in a memo to staffers that the shop made the “difficult” decision to resign the account after doing a “profitability assessment” on the assignment. Ensuing talks with the client apparently could not resolve outstanding issues. Lea wrote that Wendy’s “contributed to our overall growth for many years and for that we thank them. We will continue to work hard on their business as we transition the account.” She also noted that the agency had won a number of accounts in 2013. We have reached out to the agency for comment but have not yet had a response.

Anomaly, which just lost its head of integrated production, Sergio Lopez, to McCann London, has hired Aolenso BBDO Auckland Creative Director Levi Slavin as the agency's new CD. Slavin came to Colenso BBDO in 2009 from Saatchi & Saatchi London. Of his joining Anomaly, Slavin said: "Anomaly is an incredibly exciting company -- one that genuinely plays in a new space. I'm thrilled to be joining the team."

Interpublic Group secretary Joy Noel, with the shop for 20 years, has sued the agency for $2 million, claiming the agency falsely blamed her for sending a threatening package to agency CEO Michael Roth. During an hour and a half of questioning back in December during which Noel denied sending the package, she claims the agency questioned her about her National Rifle Association membership and "supposed gun activities." She also denies having anything to do with her NRA membership cards being inside the package. She's was suspended and escorted out of the office. Noel says the agency's action is in retaliation for a previous lawsuit she filed claiming the agency engaged in race discrimination.

I'd like to wish John Hilbrich and Mark Anthony good luck. Why? Because the two have set out to create a bit of an oxymoron -- an agency holding company that isn't an agency holding company. You see, the two, who have launched Sandbox in Chicago, aim to, as Lewis Lazare writes, "challenge the status quo in the ad industry." How? By creating partnerships between agencies that are designed to highlight talent and fuel business efficiencies. Really? How is that any different than the holding company they are trying so hard not to be?

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