77% Of Ad Agencies Are Now Able To Explain Native Advertising To Their Clients

A recent UK study queried ad agencies about their thoughts on native advertising. While 77% of agencies are now comfortable explaining native advertising to clients, many are concerned about how to scale the practice and 63% don't think the practice is effectively regulated. Furthermore, 83% of agencies now include the practice of native advertising as part of their digital offering and the other 17% plan to do so in the immediate future. In aggregate, the study -- conducted by FaR Partners on behalf of ad platform Adyoulike -- found that UK agencies believe native advertising will comprise 9.2% of total digital spend in 2014 and 14.7% by 2015.

In what may be the most cogent and refreshing viewpoint heard from an ad agency exec, Monica Little, who is stepping down as CEO of Minneapolis-based Little & Co., said: “I made the decision years ago that I didn’t want to sell to an outside firm because I’ve seen other companies that did and they were eviscerated. I like money, but my mortgage is paid. And I’m not about wringing as much as I can out of the company. Life is too short. It was about valuable work and working with these smart people.” Thanks for that, Monica. You've given us hope that the entire advertising industry is not populated entirely with money-grubbing power grabbers who are more concerned with how many toys they have versus how well they take care of their agency and its employees.

Hmm. Who knew Segway still existed? The thing was supposed to reinvent human transportation and all it has become is a joke in a movie about a mall cop. Anyway, the brand has announced that it has selected Aroluxe to serve as its agency of record. Segway will lean on Aroluxe to bring "uniformity and a fresh direction" to the brand with new creative, sales and dealer support, demand generation programs, and an ecommerce Web site. Of the agency selection, Segway VP of Marketing Brian Buccella said: “As we move our brand forward into new and emerging EV segments, we wanted a partner who could take our vision of redefining the green personal transportation market, bring it to life, and then amplify that vision across all channels. For us, there’s no doubt that we made the right decision. We look for passion and creativity, and Aroluxe has a surplus of both.” Well, anyway, good luck expanding beyond mall cops.

iProspect has hired Sam Huston as chief strategy officer. Prior to joining the iProspect team, Huston was partner, SVP of Strategy and Innovation at Jumptank. He also worked across the Dentsu Aegis Network, including Carat, Isobar and Vizeum. Over the last 14 years, he's worked across agency specialties including media, creative, and entertainment. He worked on P&G, Adidas Boost, Red Bull, Disney and GoPro. In this role, Huston will oversee client campaigns and service team collaborations. Based in San Francisco, he will report to iProspect President Jeremy Cornfeldt.

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3 comments about "77% Of Ad Agencies Are Now Able To Explain Native Advertising To Their Clients".
  1. curtis anne from ADM Enterprises , September 2, 2014 at 8:07 a.m.
    Make your brand popular with #mocolive connecting the world through its services like bulk sms, short code, long code and many more. For more info:- www.mocolive.com
  2. Nathan Easom from MobileROI , September 2, 2014 at 9:18 a.m.
    Is this an example of Native ads Curtis Anne?
  3. Anni Paul from BoscoSystems , September 2, 2014 at 8:26 p.m.
    That's funny. So they can "Explain it"... okay, but can they do it correctly? Other than what we're seeing from a few major publishers and quality ad platforms like Airpush and Facebook, it's hard to say that there's a lot of good native advertising out there.
  • Lowe Lintas India Wins Warc 100 Agency Ranking

    The Warc 100, an annual list of the best agencies based on an analysis of winning campaigns across 87 different award events or competitions, has named Lowe Lintas India the number one agency on its 2015 list. The agency scored 213 points and was closely followed by AMV BBDO with 191 and Colenso BBDO with 148.

    Of the recognition, Lowe Lintas India CEO Joseph George said: "We have had a terrific run on creative effectiveness this year across the globe; and all the accolades have further reinforced our belief in the type of work we want to do and believe in."

    Chicago's Starcom MediaVest Group Chicago was named top media agency, followed by PHD Mumbai. 360i New York was named top digital agency with R/GA New York taking second place.

    The Warc 100 is a ranking of top marketing campaigns and companies that the organization says is based on their performance in effectiveness and strategy competitions. The organization does not disclose the competitions that it uses to devise the ranking.

  • This Ad Contest Could Get You A Free Trip to Cannes. Just Don't Tell Your Boss

    Here's a semi-hilarious promotion for Canada's National Advertising Challenge that brings to light an all too prevalent problem in the ad industry -- an overzealous focus on awards. But the promotion promotes just that -- an overzealous focus on awards, and in this case, awards for non-client ads developed simply to win those awards.

    Yes, this is what you brands are paying for. Because you know the creatives in the agency you've hired are going to be doing this work in the office, conceivably on your dime. But, hey, when you dangle the chance to win a trip to Cannes as the prize for this contest, you're going to have creative salivating like dogs in heat.

    Of the Challenge, NAC Marketing and Communications Manager Ellie Metrick said: "We have big aspirations for the NAC, but we were facing a serious comprehension issue within the creative community. This year's online video goes a long way in explaining that we offer creatives an opportunity to do original work in exchange for a chance to go to Cannes."

    But because I know all you creatives are just jonesing for this, the briefs go live March 2 and the work must be completed by March 30.
  • Havas Chicago Ignores Disastrous Effects of Open Office Space, Spends $10 Million Creating One

    Clearly Havas Chicago hasn't been paying attention to recent research that found open office space to be decidedly less productive than that of the old school office. The agency recently completed a $10 million renovation of its 81,000-square-foot River North office space transforming two floors of office space into a wide open, unproductive free-for-all.

    And get this. The agency used to occupy three floors. Now it occupies two. They say that's because the new office design uses space more efficiently. Translated into English, that means stuffing the same amount of bodies into a smaller space to save money.

    The new design has done away with all offices and added all the usual distracting crap you'd expect to see in an advertising agency: graffiti, a soda fountain and a bubble hockey table. They've even added bicycle racks and a "town hall" meeting area with bleachers. Oh, and they've given the new space a cute new name; Havas Village. Because yeah -- it takes a village to raise children and, well, that's pretty much what ad agency people are; spoiled little brats who prefer a playpen instead of an office in which to "work."

    Okay, that's harsh, but I can say that because I've been there. 

    Of the new space, Havas Chicago CEO Paul Marobella said: "The big part of this space, outside of how cool it is, is that it's really built for utility and built for a purpose. Creative, media, strategy and account all sit together, organized by account. What's different about us is we can make a decision on Monday and it will be implemented by Friday."

    Oh, really? How is making a decision on Monday and implementing it on Friday any different than any other agency that decides to do that?
  • Ad Man Offers Advice to Adults In Agencies Who Act Like Children

    It's really kind of strange -- and, well, depressing -- that actual adults with actual jobs in actual ad agencies that are actual businesses that, you know, are run by actual adults actually need advice like this, but apparently this is the case.

    Penning a piece for The Chattanoogan (what the hell kind of name for a news outlet is that?), Connect Marketing Head Honcho Clint Powell has some advice that really shouldn't be the kind of advice that actual adults need. Kids, maybe, but actual adults? No. In any event, he wrote the piece and if you've worked in the ad business for any length of time, you know full well there are, unfortunately, plenty of people who need this advice.

    His advice? Knowing when to say things clearly and in a way that doesn't waste other people's time nor make you end up looking like a fool. He offers up four things that are perfectly okay to say but for some reason, people are too scared to say them. They are "I am sorry," "I can not do that," "I don't know" and "Let's be clear." You can read his whole article for the details but, seriously, you really shouldn't have to. 

  • Jordan Zimmerman's Muscles Win Him Men's Fitness, Muscle & Fitness Accounts

    Have you seen Jordan Zimmerman's biceps? The man is ripped. Ripped, I tell you! And here I struggle to do 5 sets of clean and jerks at 85 pounds in CrossFit class! Now, whether or not Zimmerman's muscles had anything to do with the fact that he just snagged an interesting assignment -- without a pitch -- from muscle magazine-heavy publisher American Media is unclear. What is clear is that the win would appear to be a perfect match for the agency.

    Zimmerman's agency, Zimmerman Advertising, won't be doing ads for the magazines, though. The agency will work with American Media to explore partnerships with other entities such as the National Basketball Association All-Star event AMI sponsored with Macy's a couple weeks ago. 

    The agency will take a close look at events like this and others to determine appropriate fits that match well with AMI titles which include Men's Fitness, Muscle & Fitness, and Flex as well as National Enquirer, Star and OK. 

    Of selecting Zimmerman, American Media CEO David Pecker said he sought and agency that "reflects the aggressive growth strategy of AMI and has a proven track record of driving growth in multiple sectors and is a true strategic partner."
  • Toronto Agency john st. Hires Guy With Same (Almost) Name

    Toronto-based agency john st. has made an interesting hire. Hoping to beef up their digital services, the agency has brought in "an accomplished entrepreneur with over 15 years of experience building global digital media and consumer internet businesses from concept through to final acquisition."

    So who did the agency hire? The guy's name is Tom St. John. Yeah. No kidding. john st. hired St. John. Like, when does that ever happen? 

    Of joining the agency, St. John says, “I feel that john st. has done some of the most innovative digital work in the country for some time now, but I believe that there is room for them to lead the broader digital discussion with clients. Analytics, social ROI, branded content, mobile advertising, online video -- these are just some of the challenges our clients are facing, and we can help them maximize those opportunities.”

  • Is Your Creative Director A Douchebag? You'll Know After They Take This Test

    Ah, you've got to love one thing about the ad business. As self-centered and as egotistical as many in it can be (hey, I know, I worked in it), it's also refreshingly awesome to witness just how much those in the business like to make fun of themselves. 

    It seems like every award show promo and witty little agency puff piece wallows in the schadenfreude of skewering every element of the ad world. Just last week, we were revisited by "Who Said It? Kanye West or Your Creative Director." Now we've got the Creative Director Douchbag Detector Device, a "state-of-the-art-futuristic-hi-tek-gismo that will calculate the potential DBAG risk of that overly paid Creative Leader."

    Here's how to use the device: "Adjust the dials and toggle the knobs to the exact specifications you are looking for in said Creative Leader and….Beep! Boop! Beep! DING! You will know with 99.997% accuracy whether the Creative Leader you want to hire has real potential… to be a complete Dill Weed.”

    I'm sure they meant to say something far more derogatory than "dill weed."
  • No, Really! Taking Someone Else's Idea And Giving It Your Own Spin Absolutely Does Make An Original!

    It must be the week for glorious creative pontification. Just a few days ago, I shared with you a video created by David Brier which attempted to define the process of branding but ended up a full-on blatherific word salad of epic proportion. 

    Now we've got a video from Director Andrew Vucko. Yes, it's a little different from Brier's effort, but it's in the same vein. In the video, Vucko takes on originality -- a hot topic in the ad world, as many ideas are simply recreations of previous ideas. Vucko's point is that nothing is ever complete, nothing is final and everything is under continuous re-development. But then the video takes a nosedive into usual rhetoric about creativity putting a new spin on things by, get this, adding yourself to the equation. Now if that isn't the most perfect assessment of the ego-centric, "I am awesome. I made this" creative world, I don't know what is.

    Vucko explains the project, which began as something completely different, saying: "Eventually, I took a step back and chose to build something on the very topic that was plaguing me -- the theme of originality. From there, I searched for references and inspiration, coming across all of these interesting quotes on the subject. While at first each quote felt like a separate idea, as I continued to read, I realized that they could be combined into a single narrative."

    The video concludes with: "It's not where you take things from, it's where you take them to." So yes. It's perfectly fine to take someone else's idea and put your stamp on it.
  • Alex Bogusky to Launch Social-Good Start-Up

    It would appear that Crispin Porter + Bogusky Co-Founder Alex Bogusky is launching a new venture. Sources say the entity will be called Spiffly, which is being described as a sort of aggregated network of "companies and professionals making and supporting a new generation of consumer products that take into consideration people, planet and profit."

    On Tuesday, Bogusky tweeted: "Excited to launch new social-good platform very soon. Imagine an agency with a community (millions) and media distribution built in."

    When I responded to Bogusky's tweet and asked whether he could share more information, he said: "I can't comment at this point." Which is totally understandable at this stage of the game. Although it's said that Spiffly will be a joint venture with Disney/ABC/Univision's cable network and digital platform Fusion.

    The Denver Egoist reports: "The agency [Bogusky clarifies Spiffly will be a "startup in the natural food space," not an agency] will begin with work for non-profits and foundations doing issue-based pushes but will plan to expand to brands doing good. Fusion has offices in Miami, LA and NYC. The new agency [start-up] will be located in Boulder."

    To me, it seems the offering will be a people-powered sort of approach to advertising and/or content distribution. We'll know more soon enough.
  • Cannes Lions Wants Agencies To Send Worst Creatives To Festival

    Working with McCann London, the folks behind Cannes Lions have launched a new campaign that suggests agencies offer to send their worst employees to the festival of creativity this year...because it's cheaper than firing them and paying severance.

    The purpose, of course, is to make one last-ditch effort to inspire the -- shall we say -- less inspired by dropping them into the center of advertising creativity for one week. I guess if after a week in Cannes they still suck, well, then it's time to bid them adieu. Although you will have to pay them severance then, so the whole send-them-to-Cannes thing is, indeed, a gamble. 

    Headlines to the ads read: "Nisha, Strategist. Has dedicated seven loyal years to your agency. With very little to show for it" and Samuel, Producer. You fought hard to hire him. Responds to every suggestion with 'It can't be done.'" The ads are signed off with "Buy her/him a delegate pass. Cheaper than severance."

    Of the approach, McCann London CCO Rob Doubal said: "Although our campaign is humorous, it makes a very sensible point. Why should being a Cannes Lions delegate be the preserve of the already excellent? If we really want a more creative world, as we all profess, we should also be encouraging the not-so-excellent performers to be inspired by Cannes Lions."

    Funny stuff, this campaign. Trouble is, now everyone that is sent to Cannes by their agency is now going to have a gigantic inferiority complex along with nightmares about whether or not agency management thinks they’re up to snuff. 

    Oh, and the poor people who had to pose for the campaign -- branded losers for life!

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