Wednesday, April 27, 2016
by Wed, Apr 27, 2016

Random iPhone App of the week: I guess you can never go home again if you take the Wyborowa Vodka challenge. The Wybo Pathbreaker app encourages people to never visit the same place or take the same route twice. It's fun for exploring new areas, but can only take you so far. The app uses GPS to determine a player's position and path, which is then presented on a map. Players can compete via a leaderboard, and there's a competition mechanic that enters the best explorers in a raffle to win a vacation for three to Las Vegas. Download the free app here, created by Perfect Fools.


For those of you still undecided on a presidential candidate, check out VoterGuru.com, a site that matches users with declared presidential candidates. The company raised capital via Horizon Media's Incubator program, where selected business plans from Horizon employees receive start-up funding and development resources.

VoterGuru tracks voting records and public statements of political candidates and compares user inputs with politician records to find the closest ideological match. Users answer 13 questions about topics like abortion, energy, education and welfare and the site tallies your best match based on how liberal or conservative you are.


Break up your boring routine by playing scratch-offs from the New York Lottery. You never know what might happen. Water-cooler talk about a rug stain was made personal in the first lotto ad. By adding a scratch-off to the mix, the stain went from looking like Australia to a co-worker. See it here. An IT guy makes a hammock from the company's Ethernet cables, shutting the entire company down. His level-headed colleague breaks up his routine by playing scratch-off games instead of potentially losing his job. Watch it here. "Take a Break from the Expected," closes both ads, created by McCann NY.


Who doesn't love the smell of a new car? Ally, an auto finance provider, built an amusing Web site that allows car buyers to customize their new car scent with the type of car they want to buy. Users select four fragrances from a bevy of options to create a scent unique to them. Select a fragrance name, car color and type, and you're ready to share your custom fragrance with friends on social media. If you're not in the mood to make your own fragrance, check out the gallery of options for compact cars, a luxury coupe, hybrid, muscle car, sedan, truck, SUV or family van. Some of the scents include yoga mat, smug, fanny pack, regret, roadkill and flannel. Grey Advertising created the campaign.


Bayer Crop Science launched "Feed a Bee," an online video designed to increase food for honeybees. Last year, the brand set a goal to plant 50 million flowers with the help of consumers by the end of 2015 to feed more bees. Consumers who joined the pledge received a free seed packet to help plant flowers in their local neighborhoods. The initiative was so successful that it was brought back this year with some additional campaign elements. Bayer Crop Science launched a music video, set to the Jason Mraz tune, "I'm Yours," with updated lyrics explaining the importance of bees in everyday life. Did you know that a bee must visit 2 million flowers to make a single one-pound jar of honey, and a bee visits roughly 500 flowers a day? Talk about working. Watch it here. There's also a FeedABee website, where users can request seeds to plant, or tweet a bee emoji. For each use of a bee emoji and hashtag #feedabee, the brand will plant wildflowers on your bee-half. BBDO Atlanta created the campaign.


Amazon launched a pair of TV ads as part of its ongoing "Showhole" campaign, promoting its Fire TV product. When the end of a beloved TV series comes to end, a binge-watcher must decide what show to watch next before falling into a dangerous "Showhole," where there's nothing to watch yet so much to watch. "Couple" shows a husband and wife drifting apart during an awkward period when they decide what show to watch next. Thanks to the Fire TV, the couple remain close and watch their new series because: "make-up bingeing is the best." See it here. "Stuck" shows a man suffering from "finale phobia." This will probably be a real diagnosis in a few years. Rather than panic, the man uses his Amazon Fire TV to guide his next bingeworthy obsession. Watch it here. WongDoody created the campaign.


McDonald's France added some limited-time options to its menu that are inspired by the Big Apple. From now until May 30, a handful of products are available, with a nod to New York street food. There are two new burgers, one with original sweet mustard and a grilled cheese with bacon; a sharing box; two salads; a wrap sandwich; fries and sundae. Supporting the new menu is a pair of TV ads that bring New York drama to an overseas audience. In the first ad, a building in New York is engulfed in flames. Bystanders watch the firemen try to contain the damage when a fireman flees the burning building with something in his hand. Is it a beloved pet or person? Not even close; it's a designer high-heeled shoe belonging to a woman awaiting her precious cargo. The fireman is rewarded with a bacon-and-grilled-cheese burger, the woman and a kitten he saved with one hand. See it here. The next ad shows an eagle-eyed detective at a crime scene pick his suspect out of a crowd, even though the man looks nothing like the composite sketch. See it here. TBWA\Paris created the campaign, directed by Ben Gregor of Moonwalk Films.


This is one large flagpole. Kentucky Fried Chicken has recommitted itself to the high standards for quality food that Colonel Sanders set many years ago. A 60-second ad describes the brand's dedication to making a quality product. In other words, sales are down and we need to fix that, stat. Changes have been made in every aspect of the organization to give consumers the fried chicken they remember from years past -- and to illustrate the company's commitment, KFC raises a flag up the world's largest, winding flagpole. The flag travels through KFC restaurants, people's houses and a baseball game before finally reaching the top. Watch "Pledge" here, created by Wieden+Kennedy Portland.


For the launch of Pepsi 1893, inspired by the original recipes created by Pepsi founder Caleb Bradham in that same year, Pepsi launched a digital campaign explaining the new soda to lovers of the brand. The soda features kola nut extract, real sugar and sparkling water, and comes in two flavors: Original and Ginger Cola. 1893 can be enjoyed on its own or added to cocktails. The first video, "What is 1893?" follows the Pepsi brand from its infancy to present day. Throughout the video, viewers watch a mixologist shake, stir and pour 1893, sometimes mixed with liquor, but most of the time it's served on its own, over ice with lime. "This is our past, made present," closes the video, seen here and created by PMK*BNC and Vowel.