Digital Savvy Hispanics Get/Give Advice

by , Aug 23, 2012, 6:15 AM
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A new analysis by BIGinsight, from the Hispanic InsightCenter, shows that Hispanics (18+) tend to be more digital-savvy than their Non-Hispanic counterparts. In addition to face-to-face communication, they are using social media and mobile technology to give and seek advice about products and services, effecting the allocation of media when marketing to this consumer group.

In general, Hispanic consumers tend to be early adopters and are more likely to own smartphones and tablets than Non-Hispanics. iPad ownership specifically is up among Hispanics from 4.2% in June 2010 to 21.3% in 2012. (14.6% of Non-Hispanics report having an iPad in 2012.)

Viewing on Mobile Devices

 

% of Users

Mobile Used to View

Hispanics

Non-Hispanics

Email

48.1%

29.2%

News

26.6

17.5

Sports

15.2

10.2

Video/TV

15.5

9.6

Source: BIGinsight, August 2012

Hispanics’ regular usage of social media also largely outpaces that of their Non-Hispanic counterparts. Usage among Hispanics indexes higher across all sites tracked in the InsightCenter.

Regular Use of Social Media/Online Communities – Index (Hispanics 18+ vs. Non-Hispanics 18+)

Media

Index vs. Non-Hispanics

Facebook

 109

Foursquare

 166

Google+

 133

Hulu

 144

LinkedIn

 127

MySpace

 155

Pinterest

 109

Twitter

 141

YouTube

 133

Source: BIGinsight, August 2012

Word of Mouth in the digital age is no longer neighbors talking over the fence, and Hispanics appear to be embracing digital means. While face-to-face remains the #1 way for them to give or seek advice about products and services, things like email, text and mobile are making their way on the list.

Top 10 Ways Hispanics Seek and Give Advice about Products and Services (% of Respondents; Hispanics 18+)

 

% of Respondents

Get/Give Information

Seek Advice

Give Advice

Face-to-Face

 75.1%

83.2%

Product Reviews

 34.6%

8.7%

Email

 24.8%

35.4%

Text Messaging

 23.7%

28.6%

Mobile Device

 23.3%

24.3%

Friends on Facebook

 20.1%

16.2%

Blogs

 16.2%

4.2%

Telephone (Landline)

 15.1%

19.6%

Instant Messaging

11.3%

13.5%

Facebook Retailer/Brand Pages

 8.4%

10.6%

Source: BIGinsight, August 2012

It’s noteworthy that there are differences among advice seekers and givers within this group. One big distinction is product reviews; 34.6% of Hispanics who seek advice read them, while only 8.7% who give advice write them. So, less than 1 in 10 are providing information in product reviews to more than three times as many people who are taking that information in to make product decisions.

Considering that digital technology is aiding in the evolution of traditional word of mouth, it’s interesting to look at media allocations that consider social media, mobile, instant messaging and blogging in the WOM equation, especially among digital-savvy Hispanic consumers. This “new” Word of Mouth dwarfs traditional medias in comparison when weighted by influence and consumption.

Allocation Model for Electronics Purchases (% of Respondents; Hispanics 18+; WOM includes: Face-to-Face, Social Media, Mobile, Text, Instant Messaging and Blogging)

Purchase Influence

% of Respondents

WOM

 30.6%

Trade Promotion

 19.0%

Direct Marketing    

 11.7%

TV

 11.0%

Radio

 10.6%

Internet Advertising

 6.6%

Magazines    

 5.9%

Newspaper

 4.7%

Source: Prosper MediaPlanIQ, June 2012 (Media influence is weighted by consumption)

For Hispanic digital behavior for specific services, in PDF format, please visit here, and for viewing the information from BIG insight, visit here.

1 comment on "Digital Savvy Hispanics Get/Give Advice".

  1. Zeph Snapp from Not Just SEO
    commented on: August 24, 2012 at 2:06 p.m.
    This data agrees with what we have found on an anecdotal basis. Most Hispanics are hesitant to comment on blogs, meaning that when we are doing outreach to bloggers we have to use different metrics than conventional marketers.

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