Results for September 2005
  • Q&A: Wooing Women through Behavioral Targeting
    Women's marketing expert Andrea Learned likes to think that women test out brands almost as if they're dating those brands. When it comes to employing behavioral targeting to woo women, Learned, the president of Learned on Women and co-author of Don't Think Pink: What Really Makes Women Buy , stresses the fine line between attracting women and turning them off.
  • Give Consumers a Choice
    Our industry has to work on educating consumers about the need for and benefits derived from cookies. Consumers need to understand that an Internet without a cookie-enabled targeted advertising model will inevitably lead to more and more content accessible only by subscription or micro-payments.
  • Getting On the Right (Audience) Track
    Cheerleaders for behavioral marketing techniques say the latest data- tracking and audience-segmenting technologies allow publishers to truly define their audiences. Finally, they say, publishers have the potential to sell all their inventory at a premium. Now that publishers can individually track and serve ads to dieters or celebrity gossip junkies, advertisers won't clamor only for high-demand contextual placements, but for any page their target market visits.
  • What's Behind the Behavioral Curtain? We May Never Know
    Online ad industry talking heads spout off all the time about the need for transparency. And this is true in the niche world of behavioral targeting (BT), especially BT networks. However, the incessant development of new ways to target consumers on the Web brings with it new ways to go undercover, too.

  • Web Radicals Might Mean Business. The Industry Should, Too
    The NETives are getting restless. Yes, alongside their anti-cookie brothers-in-arms, freedom-fighter factions are taking to the virtual streets in an effort to sabotage Web publishers and the data they rely on to stay in business. Call 'em the Free My Media Coalition or The Web-Stir Underground. Whatever these Web warriors are called, their uprising could have both positive and negative effects on publishers, advertisers, and vendors in the behavioral targeting (BT) industry.