Phyllis Fine, Dec 31, 2013, 12:20 PM
  • Comcast Finding: Binge Watching Helps Live TV RatingsVentureBeat

    Comcast found that adding "all current-season episodes for a handful of shows to its on-demand video library" boosted the average ratings for  "the live premiere of the following episode" from 34% for broadcast shows to 69% for cable series, writes Tom Chereder. "Media companies that make TV shows are starting to realize that time-shifted and on-demand content is beneficial to the industry-standard TV ratings for new episode premieres." Read the whole story...

  • Venture Capital Flowing Like It's 1999The Wall Street Journal

    Fostering competition (and making the emergence of the next Facebook more likely), venture capital is flowing faster than ever. The most raised since early 2001, domestic VC investment hit $10.74 billion in the first quarter, The Wall Street Journal reports, citing data from Dow Jones VentureSource. “This is only the second time since 2001 that venture investment exceeded $10 billion in a quarter,” WSJ writes.
     

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  • Pivot, Channel For Millennials, Gets First Scripted SeriesThe New York Times

    Pivot, a cable channel launched last July targeted to Millennials, is beefing up its programming with new shows that include its first original scripted series, “Fortitude,” "a 12-episode drama set in the Arctic" starring the likes of Stanley Tucci and Michael Gambon, writes Stuart Elliott. "In keeping with Pivot’s tilt toward purpose programming, the drama is 'an eco-thriller' that should appeal to Generation Y, Evan Shapiro, president of Pivot," said at the channel's upfront presentation. Read the whole story...

  • 'USA Today' Debuts Online Sports Photography StoreTalking New Media

    USA Today recently launched an online store where consumers can purchase sports photographs -- including "a collection of more than 3,000 early-career photos of Muhammad Ali, all from the library of The Courier-Journal, the Gannett daily in Louisville, Kentucky (hometown of Muhammad Ali)," writes D.B. Hebbard. Read the whole story...

  • 'Playboy' Reprints First Issue 60 Years LaterFolio

    Playboy magazine rereleased its inaugural issue, first published in December 1953, priced at $9.99 (original went for 50 cents), $2 more than a typical issue sells for now. But there's an iconic shot of Marilyn Monroe on its cover (and, we assume, some photos of her less-than-clothed inside). "The replica does not feature any new advertorial, so the revenue is all through one-off sales," writes Caysey Welton. "And like everyone else, subscribers will need to get the issue at their local newsstands or order it online." Read the whole story...

  • Squarespace Gets Fresh $40M TechCrunch

    Web site platform Squarespace just raided $40 million from General Atlantic and General Atlantic alone. Founded in 2003, the start-up, which specializes in tools for individuals and small businesses to build sites and online stores, TechCrunch reports. With the fresh funds, “we will improve the overall Squarespace experience, make it available to more people around the world, and … go beyond Web sites and online stores,” CEO Anthony Casalena stated. Read the whole story...

  • Creative Review Shortlists Getting Longer, Increasing CompetitionAdweek

    The short lists of finalists in a creative review to win a company's ad business are getting longer, up to five or more competitors, decreasing the odds of winning the "long and expensive pitch process," writes Andrew McMains. Why? Three reasons, at least: "market conditions, the number of decision makers involved and when the brand last searched for a new agency," McMains writes. Read the whole story...

  • Weak Margins Could Cloud Google's Q1 EarningsCNBC

    Google is expected to post strong earnings after the closing bell, today. Yet, the search giant’s operating margins are a concern for analysts, according to CNBC. Brian Wieser, an analyst at Pivotal Research, believes there is margin erosion in Google's core business. “The company is keeping more of every dollar it earns and eventually ,that will likely backlash on the stock,” CNBC reports, citing Wieser’s comments. Analysts surveyed by Thomson Reuters expect 11% year-over-year gain in earnings and revenue.
     

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  • TV Execs Laughing At Yahoo's Content AmbitionsThe New York Times

    Under new leadership, Yahoo is taking another crack at “quality” long-form content. “Good luck with that,” is more or less the response from seasoned network execs. “It is the pure arrogance of the newly rich and the newly powerful to think content is easy,” John Landgraf, chief executive of FX Networks, tells David Carr. “Breaking through in a cluttered marketplace requires expertise in all of the elements of storytelling. There are so many ways it can go wrong.”
     

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  • W+K Selected As Citizen's Global AgencyAdweek

    Citizen has hired Wieden + Kennedy as its global branding agency. The agency’s Tokyo office will head the account, along with the agency’s Amsterdam office. Citizen spent $24 million on media in 2013, according to Kantar. Read the whole story...

  • Google Planning Huge NYC ExpansionThe Wall Street Journal

    Apparently, the city block-sized building that Google bought in 2010 for about $2 billion is no long big enough to hold the company’s growing army of salespeople, media experts, engineers and execs. The search giant is currently searching for another space to hold some 3,000 employees, The Wall Street Journal reports, citing sources. Google is looking into leasing as much as 600,000 square feet in Manhattan -- “about half the size of the Chrysler Building,” by WSJ’s estimate.
     

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  • Why Web Start-ups Can't Say No To CapitalThe New York Times

    Why are Web start-up likes Quora and Airbnb increasingly prone to taking big late-stage investments? Marc Bodnick, head of Quora’s business operations, says the answer is simple. “The more capital you have … the more comfortable and confident you can be,” he tells The New York Times. That, and “start-ups are staying private longer, venture capital firms are looking to put idle funds to work, and institutional investors are chasing returns,” NYT notes.
     

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  • Maker Studios Cofounder Trying To Derail Disney TakeoverWall Street Journal

    Danny Zappin, Maker Studios cofounder and former CEO, is trying to curb the company’s sale to Disney. Along with three other former executives, Zappin has filed a lawsuit aiming to prevent a shareholder vote to approve a takeover bid by Disney, The Wall Street Journal reports. “The group claims documents that Maker sent to shareholders to vote on the merger agreement with Disney failed to include a reference to a pending lawsuit that alleged some Maker directors issued shares to themselves to dilute Mr. Zappin's ownership and reduce his ability to control the company.”
     

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  • CNN Launches New Prime-Time StrategyCNN.com

    CNN will begin to devote the 9 p.m. hour of prime time to new taped shows, starring Mike Rowe, Anthony Bourdain and others. The strategy is a shift away from the talk show format that CNN has featured at 9 p.m. for 30 years, first with "Larry King Live," then with "Piers Morgan Tonight." At 10 p.m., the cabler will offer rotating hosts in a new show called "CNN tonight," which addresses the day's biggest stories. Read the whole story...

  • Reddit Tests Trending Subreddit FeatureTechCrunch

    While its user interface may seem very 1990, Reddit is so popular that the slightest service tweak can get Web watchers talking. TechCrunch, for instance, is really excited about the site’s new “trending subreddit” feature, which gives reader a list of the most popular sub-communities. “It’s easy for one huge community to die almost overnight (see: Digg),” TechCrunch writes. “But a community made up of a zillion sub-communities? That’s a different beast.”
     

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  • EBay Appeases IchanThe New York Times

    Following a very public feud, EBay and Carl Ichan are making nice. The activist investor is withdrawing his bid for two seats on the company’s board and his demand that it sell a minority stake in its PayPal unit to shareholders, The New York Times reports. “In return, eBay will add as a new director -- David W. Dorman, the former chief executive of AT&T and a candidate both sides have agreed on.”
     

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  • Rolling Stone Put Its John Hancock On Wrong DocNew York Post

    Julia Louis-Dreyfus bared all for the new Rolling Stone cover, posing with a "tattoo" of the US Constitution on her back. But the sexy shot revealed more than just the "Veep" star's toned backside - it was inked with an embarrassing historical flub. Under the famous line "We the People ..." sits the signature of the statesman who signed the Declaration of Independence - not the Constitution. Read the whole story...

  • Hollywood Stars Back Showtime's Climate Change DocumentaryReuters

    As temperatures continue to rise, a group of Hollywood stars wants to focus on climate change with a new documentary. "Years of Living Dangerously," a nine-part documentary beginning Sunday on CBS Corp's premium cable network Showtime, charts the impact on the global climate and the consequences for humanity. Director James Cameron appealed to well-known Hollywood actors to act as correspondents, including Harrison Ford, Matt Damon, Don Cheadle, Jessica Alba and Michael C. Hall. Read the whole story...

  • Graydon Carter Named To ASME Hall Of FameNew York Post

    Graydon Carter, one of the longest serving editors in the Cond Nast empire, was named to the Hall of Fame of the American Society of Magazine Editors. Carter last year inked a new multiyear agreement to stay at the helm of Vanity Fair in what many expect may be his final three-year contract. Read the whole story...

  • Tony Gervino Named Editor At 'Billboard'New York Times

    Billboard, the music industry's premier trade publication for more than a century, has named Tony Gervino as its editor, the latest in a series of changes to remake the magazine in a more general-interest direction. Gervino, 47, is a former executive editor of Hearst Magazines International, and has been an editor at various lifestyle and sports magazines like Antenna and Slam. Read the whole story...

  • Study: Old-Fashioned Radio Still Captures Majority Of U.S. ListenersQuartz

    Old-fashioned AM/FM radio still has an "astonishing level of penetration," trouncing satellite and Internet radio: 91% of U.S. listeners, according to Pew Research Center/Nielsen Audio numbers. And "44% of all radio listening takes place in the car, where terrestrial radio has an 80% share, according to Macquarie" Capital, writes John McDuling. Read the whole story...

  • 'Holiday' Magazine Is RevivedWomen's Wear Daily

    Holiday, an American travel magazine whose heyday was the 1940s through 1960s, is being revived with a fashion theme, published twice a year out of Paris. The first issue will be available later this month in 800 international locations, including WHSmith bookstore in Paris and the Around the World shop in New York. Read the whole story...

  • Candidates Start Jockeying For Letterman's JobThe New York Times

    "Let the maneuvering begin" as potential candidates begin to jockey for what's "now officially the most coveted job in television: successor to David Letterman," writes Bill Carter. He analyzes the field, from"obvious choice" Stephen Colbert, who would  "match the more contemporary approach to late night, relying on comedy pieces that play well on the Internet and draw heavily on social media" to women candidates from Ellen Degeneres to Chelsea Handler to Tina Fey. Read the whole story...

  • Univision Radio Cuts Dozens Of StaffersLos Angeles Times

    Univision Communications is laying off programming staff and some on-air hosts  at its radio stations around the country -- a total of "dozens of workers" at some of its 68 stations, including Chicago, writes Meg James. Read the whole story...

  • David Letterman Set To Retire From CBS' 'Late Night' In 2015The Hollywood Reporter

    David Letterman will retire from late-night TV in 2015, when his current contract as host of CBS' "Late Show" expires. He announced the news on the taping of the Thursday night broadcast of the show. Letterman recently surpassed Johnny Carson "as the longest-running host in late-night TV history when factoring in his time with CBS' 'Late Show' and his 11-year tenure with NBC on 'Late Night,'" according to The Hollywood Reporter. Read the whole story...

  • AMC Won't Sell Last Episode Of 'Mad Men' In UpfrontAdvertising Age

    AMC will not sell the series finale of "Mad Men," set to air sometime in 2015, in the upfront, but as part of the later scatter marketplace. "We will sell it almost like a sporting event," says Charlie Collier, president of AMC Networks. "It is going to be a pop-culture moment and we're coming to market as such." Read the whole story...

  • Conde Nast Boots 'Self' EIC And A PublisherAdweek

    More top job changes are afoot at Condé Nast, courtesy once again of company artistic director and Vogue EIC Anna Wintour: Cosmopolitan executive editor Joyce Chang will become editor in chief of Self May 1. She replaces Lucy Danziger, who spent 13 years atop the masthead. "The 1.5 million-circ magazine has also been struggling both on the newsstand, where single-copy sales were down 10 percent in the second half of 2013, and in ad pages, which fell 5.7 percent in 2013," writes Lisa Granatstein.  And "Laura McEwen, who earlier had been vp, publisher of Teen Vogue and associate publisher of Vogue, is also exiting." Read the whole story...

  • Eich Out At Mozilla Over Prop. 8 SupportLos Angeles Times

    That’s that. Brendan Eich is out as CEO of Mozilla following widespread criticism of the browser maker’s decision to appoint the opponent of gay marriage. In 2008, Eich supported Proposition 8, the California constitutional amendment that forbade the marriage of same-sex couples in the state. “Mozilla said it is still discussing what comes next for its leadership,” the Los Angeles Times reports.
      Read the whole story...

  • WTF! Gawker Expels "Internet Slang"Poynter

    OMG! Gawker just forbade staff writes from using “Internet slang,” including popular acronyms, and words likes “epic,” “pwn” and “derp.” In an internal memo obtained by Poynter, new Gawker editor Max Read writes: “We want to sound like regular adult human beings, not Buzzfeed writers or Reddit commenters.” As Poynter reports, “He also asks staffers not to use strikethrough for corrections, preferring they ‘change the wording and link from there to a comment noting the corrected text.’”
     

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  • Time Inc.: 'Rudderless Ship' Or 'Innovator'?Capital New York

    As Time Inc.prepares to spin off from its corporate conglomerate, headed by its fourth CEO in five years, it's unclear where it's headed, according to "interviews with analysts and current and former employees and executives," writes Joe Pompeo. In fact, "these sources painted a picture of a company with legendary brand value that’s caught somewhere between being a rudderless ship full of print products and an innovator that’s well-equipped to navigate media’s digitally-oriented future (with $1.3 billion worth of debt and declining revenues in tow, no less)." Read the whole story...

  • Captivate To Own Majority Of Video Screens In Elevators, Lobbies After DealAdvertising Age

    Capitvate Network, which owns the majority of video screens in elevators, will soon own nearly all screens in building lobbies as well,  since it just bought Office Media Network, operator of The Wall Street Journal Office Network. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Read the whole story...

  • Mozilla CEO Supports Inclusiveness Of ExclusivenessCnet

    Brendan Eich, Mozilla's recently appointed CEO, is confused about the controversy surrounding his opposition to gay marriage. As he tells CNet, he thought the Web browser maker was all about inclusiveness of ideas, including his belief that gay Americans should be excluded from the practice of marriage. “Mozilla has always worked according to principles of inclusiveness,” he says. “Everyone in our community can have different beliefs about all sorts of things that may be in conflict.”
     

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  • Why The 'Mother' Had To Die: Ugly Wedding Dress?New York Magazine

    There's been a ton of press and viewers' comments on the Monday night series finale of "How I Met Your Mother," in which the mother  faced a sad ending that outraged many. But here's the first piece that uses the mother's fashion choices as clues to her demise, criticizing the wedding dress she wore: an "ill-fitting, high-shine poly-sateen" that "practically sounded a death knell in my head," writes Veronica Gledhill. Read the whole story...

  • 'Cosmo' May Issue Combines Edit/Ad Cover LinesWomen's Wear Daily

    Cosmopolitan's May issue "features a relatively new trend... that could further blur the line between advertising and editorial," writes Alexander Steigrad: a double cover, with the top, peel-away one combining editorial headlines with a bottom line advertising a L'Oreal contest, with a full-page ad on the inside of that cover. “It gives me twice the real estate  to explain what’s in the magazine," says Cosmo editor Joanna Coles. "It’s not purely an ad." Read the whole story...

  • Is Yahoo Shuttering Shine?Re/code

    Once thought to be a safe bet for Web publishers, women’s sites are closing left and right. As AOL’s iVillage and DailyCandy wind down operations, Yahoo is reportedly planning to shutter Shine by the second quarter. In its place, “The company is considering chopping it all up and relaunching a series of online lifestyle ‘magazines,’ with a similar model to what it has done with Yahoo Tech and the hiring of high-profile editor and reviewer David Pogue,” Re/Code reports.
     

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  • CBS Might Create Aereo RivalBloomberg

    CBS would consider starting an streaming over-the-top TV service with other networks to rival Aereo if the Supreme Court rules that the contested company "can resell broadcasters’ programming without their permission," writes Bloomberg reporters. “We are going to win either way,” says CBS CEO Les Moonves. Read the whole story...

  • Comcast CEO Sees Future On Global ScaleThe New York Times

    If its merger with Time Warner Cable is approved, Comcast will begin to take its place "as a global technology company and its major competitors the media companies of the future: Google, Amazon, Facebook and even Apple, with which Comcast has been engaging in tentative negotiations," according to the way the company's chief, Eric Roberts, sees it, writes James B. Stewart. “The alternative was to sit around and let cable die a slow death,” Roberts says. Read the whole story...

  • 'Forbes' Launches Branded Airport NewsstandsAdweek

    Aiming to take advantage of travelers' still-active interest in magazines, Forbes recently launched its first branded airport newsstand in Detroit’s Metropolitan Wayne County Airport, with three more to come in Washington Reagan and Washington Dulles airports. Branding means the stores will contain "TVs streaming content from the Forbes video network and interactive touch-screen computers on which customers can browse Forbes.com," writes Emma Bazilian. Also, "throughout the year, the newsstands will run in-store promotions around various Forbes editorial franchises." Read the whole story...

  • CNN Atlanta Lays Off 16, Braces For More Job ChangesMediabistro

    Roughly 16 video editors and photojournalists have been laid off from CNN Atlanta, with "at least 160 [more] positions... set to change in some way due to new technologies," according to a source cited by Jordan Chariton. Read the whole story...

  • How Television Without Pity Helped Create 'Contemporary TV Culture'Vulture/New York Magazine

    NBCUniversal's recent killing of TV recap website Television Without Pity, including all of its archives, "feels like a heartless, shortsighted move... but even if TWoP itself disappears, there's no way for its long reach ever will," writes Margaret Lyons. "TWoP helped create contemporary TV culture as we know it." Lyons explains further how "TWoP certainly popularized the recap concept — which is now utterly pervasive across entertainment-based and general-interest sites — but it also introduced a new vein of what TV coverage entails." Read the whole story...

  • Microsoft Sees Spencer As Xbox SaviorVentureBeat

    Microsoft has tapped Phil Spencer, head of the company’s game studios, to oversee its Xbox business. “As such, he’ll have the task of making the Xbox One more competitve against rivals, as well as helping to spread gaming to more and more people around the globe,” VentureBeat reports. “He will take on that role at a time when Microsoft has been losing ground to Sony in the core game business.”
     

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  • NJ 'Star-Ledger' Expects Staff LayoffsNorthJersey.com

    Advance Publications Inc. said it will create "a new company, NJ Advance Media, to provide advertising, marketing and news content" for its Star-Ledger, New Jersey's largest newspaper -- but there will also be layoffs coming as well, writes Hugh Morley. Read the whole story...

  • Twitter Hasn't Grown User BaseQZ.com

    Shockingly, a mainstream audience continues to resist Twitter’s firehouse feed of self-promoters, social climbers, sales pitches, inside jokes and side conversations. “Despite widespread media publicity surrounding Twitter during its triumphant IPO in November, it failed to add meaningfully to its user base during the fourth quarter, and since then questions have begun to mount over its ability to rectify that,” Quartz reports. Yet, CEO Dick Costolo remains determined to change all that.
     


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  • Dish, DirecTV Said To Be Talking About MergerBloomberg

    Dish Network's Chairman and DirecTV's CEO recently discussed merging the two companies, according to sources cited by Alex Sherman. Still they are "reluctant to push forward with formal talks out of concern regulators may block the deal because the two companies directly compete with each other." Read the whole story...

  • NBCUniversal Dumping DailyCandy, Television Without PityRe/code

    After ditching iVillage, NBCUniversal is doing away with DailyCandy and Television Without Pity. “The reason for the closing down was pretty basic: Despite creating laudable sites, there was still not enough traffic and, therefore, a difficulty monetizing the properties,” Kara Swisher reports in Re/Code. “Attempts to sell the properties were made, but apparently were unsuccessful.” DailyCandy cost Comcast’s media unit $125 million back in 2008.
      Read the whole story...

  • Aereo: We'll Win Supreme Court Case Or DisappearFierce Cable.com

    Aereo has no Plan B if it loses its copyright battle with broadcasters in the Supreme Court, writes Jim Barthold. In that case, it will probably go out of business, according to an interview with the company's CEO, Chet Kanojia. "The deck seems stacked against Aereo," writes Barthold, noting that the Justice Department recently "threw its support behind broadcast networks... in claiming that Aereo gives consumers access to copyright content and doesn't pay licensing fees for that content."

    Read the whole story...

  • TV Land's First Live Commercials To Star Cast Members From Two ShowsThe New York Times

    It's a "back-to-the-future moment on Madison Avenue," with cast members from two TV Land series starring in the channel's first-ever live commercials (and the first of their kind probably since the 1960s), writes Stuart Elliott. On “Hot in Cleveland," all the main actresses (including TV veteran Betty White) will be pitching the Toyota Highlander, while Niecy Nash, star of “The Soul Man,”  will advertise Bush’s Grillin’ Beans. Read the whole story...

  • Spotify Eyes IPOQZ.com

    It is looking increasingly likely that Spotify will take the big public plunge before the end of the year. “The popular music-streaming company has participated in informal chats with some of the investment banks likely to fight for a role in a potential IPO,” Quartz reports, citing sources. “The 6-year-old service may start holding formal meetings as early as next month in anticipation of an offering in autumn.”
     
      Read the whole story...

  • 'WSJ' Tries To Avoid Breaking News On TwitterPoynter

    The Wall Street Journal "generally avoid[s]...breaking news on Twitter," noted managing editor Gerard Baker in a speech in London. "We generally break to paying subscribers,” he added. However, that rule is broken on occasion,  one observer noted, pointing out that WSJ did break the story of Philip Seymour Hoffman's death on the social network. Read the whole story...

  • Tarantino Doubles Down On Gawker LawsuitThe Hollywood Reporter

    Far from dismissing his lawsuit against Gawker, Quentin Tarantino and his lawyers now say the publisher “contrived the very ‘news story’ that it now seeks to hide behind.” As The Hollywood Reporter notes, “That would be a Jan. 23 post on Gawker's Defamer blog headlined, "Here Is the Leaked Quentin Tarantino Hateful Eight Script," which included a link to a third-party Web site hosting the 146-page script.”
     

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  • What's Wrong With 'The Oregonian' Web Strategy?Gigaom

    Is The Oregonian’s proposed plan to increase Web traffic a step in the wrong direction? Among other critics of the increased emphasis on clicks, Mathew Ingram writes in GigaOm: “A purely traffic-driven approach to digital media can lead to cheap click-bait, and potentially damage the trust that readers have in a publication.” That said, Ingram thinks the paper would be wise to give writers story quotas, encourage reader participation, and “focus on different types of posts -- news posts, engagement posts, aggregation posts, etc.”  
     

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  • Spotify Cuts Service Costs For College KidsSan Jose Mercury News

    How badly does Spotify want in with the U.S. college crowd? So badly that the streaming music startup is halving the cost of its premium service for this valuable demographic. With the $5-a-month deal, “it hopes to entice a generation of music lovers that is more likely to stream music than buy CDs to pay for better features and mobile access,” the Associated Press reports. “Jeff Levick, Spotify's chief marketing and revenue officer, says a similar program in Britain has increased the number of paying Spotify customers over the last year.”
     

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  • March Madness Games Garner Record Digital ViewsVariety

    March Madness games generated record Web and mobile views in the first three days of the college basketball tournament, with NCAA March Madness Live service, managed by Turner Sports, tracking 21 million video streams from last Tuesday to Thursday. That's "up 42% versus last year, [with] more than 4 million hours of live video (up 18%), according to Turner, citing data from Omniture, Conviva and Bango," writes Todd Spangler. Read the whole story...

  • 'Business Insider' Welcomes Anthony WeinerThe Huffington Post

    Perhaps as planned, Business Insider’s latest hire is getting a lot of attention. Yes, bringing on Anthony Weiner to pen a political column dubbed “Weiner!” has “wags everywhere digging into their past to find their best 2012-era genital puns,” Huffington Post reports. Henry Blodget, co-founder, CEO and editor-In chief of Business Insider, knows something about reinventions. Once a highflying stock analyst, Blodget was permanently banned from the securities industry after he was charged with civil securities fraud in 2003.
     

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  • 'American Idol' Falls To Ratings LowThe New York Times

    The once-mighty "American Idol" has fallen to "a new ratings low Thursday night, one that would have seemed incomprehensible even two years ago," with a 1.9 for viewers 18 and 49 and "the smallest overall audience — 8.4 million viewers — since a night in July in its first year," writes Bill Carter. Those numbers are "surely a psychological blow to the series, which once routinely hit a double-figure rating in that 18-49 category." Read the whole story...

  • TheWrap.com Wins With "Clickier" ContentThe New York Times

    After embracing a “clickier” content strategy, TheWrap.com is now beating out key competitions like Deadline Hollywood and Variety. “Talk about going from fizzle to sizzle,” The New York Times reports. “For the months of December through February … TheWrap attracted an average of 2.8 million unique visitors from United States desktop computers,” NYT writes, citing comScore data. “In the period a year earlier, TheWrap had an average of 755,000 unique visitors.”
     


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  • Viacom, Tumblr, Team For Co-Branded CampaignsAdweek

    Viacom is teaming up officially with blogging platform Tumblr to create co-branded campaigns for shows and events, starting with the MTV Movie Awards. Reportedly, Viacom is the first company to have such a formal agreement with the social platform, writes Sam Thielman. Read the whole story...

  • Are Metrics Killing News Media?The New York Times

    With just a dash of disdain, David Carr concedes that metrics-driven media is fundamentally reshaping journalism. But, whether the shift is ultimately good or bad for reporters -- and the publishers than employ them -- is anyone’s guess. “Depending on your perspective, the trend could be a long overdue embrace of the realities of the publishing landscape, or one more step down the road to perdition,” Carr writes in The New York Times. “Just because something is popular does not make it worthy, but ignoring audience engagement is a sure route to irrelevance.”
     

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  • NY Gov Cuomo Could Undo Comcast-TWC MergerNew York Post

    New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is proposing changes to state rules that would "put the onus on Comcast to prove that its mega-merger with TWC is in the public interest" and give New York state's Public Service Commission "much greater oversight of the proposed cable combo, making it almost impossible to finalize," according to sources cited by New York Post reporters. Read the whole story...

  • Study: TV Subscriptions Fall By Almost Quarter-MillionBloomberg

    The U.S. pay TV market is declining, with more than a quarter of a million users of cable, satellite or fiber services pulling the plug in 2013, according to an SNL Kagan report. "If the slide continues in the coming years, that means 2012 was the industry’s high point," writes Edmund Lee. Read the whole story...

  • Top-Rated 'Walking Dead' Gets First Broadcast Run In FallThe Hollywood Reporter

    AMC's"The Walking Dead" will expand its reach beyond cable to broadcast this fall, with each new episode appearing on MyNetworkTV one night a week. "This first off-net deal for [the top-rated show] comes at the end of its fourth season as it hits 51 episodes," writes Michael O'Connell. Read the whole story...

  • CBS Outdoor Americas Files IPOBloomberg

    CBS filed an initial public offering for its Outdoor Americas division in a bid to raise as much as $560 million by selling 20 million shares for $26 to $28 apiece. The parent company will still own 83% afterward. "About 47% of the company’s billboards and transit displays are in New York while 13% are in Los Angeles,  according to today’s filing," writes James Callan. Read the whole story...

  • Why And How Data-Driven Journalism Is BoomingUSA Today

    Data-driven journalism is booming, with news organizations "pouring money into recruiting talent and expanding their menu of stories derived from a mix of sophisticated number crunching, explanatory narratives and interactive graphics that weren't possible in the old days of print," writes Roger Yu.

    Besides the fame of Nate Silver, known for "his eerily accurate prediction of President Obama's victory in the 2012 election," other reasons for this trend include the relatively cheaper cost of "software that processes data and turn them into attractive graphics," as well as the fact that "cloud technology — storing information on remote servers — has lowered the price of storing massive loads of data," writes Yu. Read the whole story...

  • Weather Channel Launches Morning Show New York Magazine

    The timing couldn't be better for the Weather Channel's just-launched morning show, "AMHQ," according to John Swanburg. "The weather hasn’t just been bad this winter—it’s been Book of Revelations bad." And "no other news organization has the Weather Channel’s ability to cover the nasty stuff." Still, "even in these perilous weather times, there are stretches when the worst things on the five-day forecast are some partly cloudy skies." Swanburg looks at the direction the channel is taking, including some dubious decisions like naming winter storms. Read the whole story...

  • Study: Native Ads Could Threaten Consumer Trust In PublishersAdvertising Age

    Data from a new Nielsen/InPowered study "raises serious questions over whether native advertising threatens to upend th[e] trust publishers have earned with their audience," writes Steve Rubel. In the study, "85% of consumers said they seek out "trusted content" [third-party articles by journalists] and 67% said it drives their buying decisions," creating  "a 15% lift in purchase intent vs.... only 8% for branded content on company/product web sites." Read the whole story...

  • Publisher: 'NY Times' Definitely Not For SaleThe Street

    Despite rumors to the contrary, The New York Times is not for sale, Arthur Sulzberger Jr., the paper's fourth-generation publisher and chairman, said at a Media Matters event at Harvard University. "Rather than looking for an exit strategy, Sulzberger said he and [cousin and vice-chairman Michael] Golden are grooming six members of the fifth generation of the Ochs-Sulzberger family to eventually take over the company once he retires, a development the chairman hastened to add isn't coming anytime soon," writes Leon Lazaroff.
    Read the whole story...

  • Zuckerberg Calls Out Obama Over Electronic SpyingReuters

    Playing activist and agitator, Mark Zuckerberg says he called President Barack Obama to condemn the U.S. government's electronic surveillance practices. "When our engineers work tirelessly to improve security, we imagine we're protecting you against criminals, not our own government," Facebook’s CEO writes in post on his Facebook page. "I've called President Obama to express my frustration over the damage the government is creating for all of our future.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Pay TV Carriers Avoid New Dodgers Network Because Of CostThe Wall Street Journal

    Another carriage fee issue is brewing in the pay-TV world -- this time over SportsNet LA, the new Dodgers-owned cable channel. Every pay-TV distributor except one is balking at the price to carry the network, "the highest-ever carriage fee for a regional sports channel of its kind, with a monthly charge per subscriber beginning at more than $4 and likely escalating to over $5 in coming years," according to sources cited by Matthew Futterman. The one exception to the shutout is Time Warner Cable, "which was involved in the formation of the network through an $8.3 billion media-rights deal." Read the whole story...

  • Hearst's 'Marie Claire' Launches New York-Distributed OffshootAdweek

    Hearst's Marie Claire introduced what it's calling a "pop-up magazine": Branché, "which loosely translates to “plugged in” in French," and will be distributed by Hearst employees throughout New York's "trendy neighborhoods" and "well-trafficked areas... such as Times Square," writes Alexandra Steigrad. Created as "an insider’s guide to New York style, culture and food and nighttime hot spots," the 40-page free book is half ads, with advertisers including H&M, Guess, and Macy's. Expect a new version in the fall. Read the whole story...

  • Study: Digital Ad Spend Will Surpass TV's Ad Take By 2018Media Life Magazine

    By 2018, digital ad spend will overtake television, the one medium that's that’s "long been out ahead of everything else," according to an eMarketer study cited by Bill Cromwell. The forecast pits TV ahead by "by a very small margin, 36.4 percent to 36.1 percent." Read the whole story...

  • Reader's Digest Gets Fourth New CEO Since 2011: Bonnie KintzerFolio

    Reader's Digest is getting its fourth CEO in three years -- Bonnie Kintzer, most recently CEO of  Women's Marketing Inc., who will take over for current company head Bob Guth April 7. Guth just announced his departure. Read the whole story...

  • Report: Sean Combs To Bid $200M For Fuse NetworkBloomberg

    Hip-hop artist and mogul Sean Combs has put in a $200 million bid for the Fuse cable TV channel, according to sources cited by Bloomberg reporters. If his bid is accepted, "he would convert Fuse, owned by Madison Square Garden Company, (MSG), into Revolt TV, which has backing from Comcast Corp." Read the whole story...

  • 'WSJ' Introduces Native Ad DivisionCapital New York

    The Wall Street Journal launched its content marketing division, WSJ.Custom Studios, with a three-month campaign for Brocade using  "a native advertising component called Narratives, the content of which will live on wsj.com but will be 'clearly and compellingly delineated from news and editorial content,' according to [an] announcement," writes Joe Pompeo. "The move shows the Journal wading into waters that managing editor Gerard Baker had previously described as a 'Faustian pact' between news outlets and brands." Read the whole story...

  • Too Much To Watch: TV's New Golden Age Excess Of RichesThe New York Times

    There's too much good stuff to watch on TV now to keep up, complains David Carr in this piece about an "excess of excellence that is fundamentally altering my media diet and threatening to consume my waking life in the process." In fact, "the growing intellectual currency of television has altered the cultural conversation in fundamental ways. Water cooler chatter is now a high-minded pursuit, not just a way to pass the time at work." Read the whole story...

  • Web's Inventor Calls For Online "Bill Of Rights"The Guardian

    Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the Web’s inventor, is calling for an online “bill of rights” to protect the Web from government and corporate abuse. “Berners-Lee's Magna Carta plan is to be taken up as part of an initiative called ‘the Web we want,’ which calls on people to generate a digital bill of rights in each country -- a statement of principles he hopes will be supported by public institutions, government officials and corporations,” The Guardian reports.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • 'New York' Mag Expands Vulture Brand Into Live FestivalAdweek

    New York magazine just dialed down its print presence to biweekly status, but it's now upping its, um, live presence with the launch of The Vulture Festival, 16 events planned for May 10-11 at Milk Studios  "meant to bring the [magazine's entertainment] site's pop culture sensibility to life," writes Lucia Moses. The festival will "offer everything from interviews to live discussions to performances, with a heavy focus on TV but including music and theater as well." Read the whole story...

  • Report: U.K. Mobile Ad Spend To Overtake Newspaper Ads For First TimeFinancial Times

    This year's ad spend for mobile devices will overtake spend for newspapers in the U.K. for the first time, according to an eMarketer report. "The forecast underscores a rapid shift in marketing budgets towards smartphones and tablets, as well as a long-running decline in print media," writes Robert Cookson. Read the whole story...

  • NBCU To Host Upfronts For Combination Of Cable NetsThe New York Times

    NBCUniversal will host an upfront event for a combination of its 17 cable channels, which include Bravo, E!, Esquire Network, Oxygen, Sprout, Syfy and USA Network, for the 2014-2015 TV season -- unlike the last several years, when NBCU hosted its cable upfronts separately. "The rethinking of how NBCUniversal goes to the upfront market... came after the company reorganized its advertising sales operations by content (that is, entertainment, live programming, lifestyle) to better reflect how marketers now buy commercial time," writes Stuart Elliott. Read the whole story...

  • 'Forbes' To Publish Central American VersionTalking Biz News

    Forbes will begin publishing a Central American edition in March "featuring the wealthiest people in the region," writes Chris Roush. Read the whole story...

  • Majority Of Millennials In Study Still Not Cord-CuttersMultichannel News

    Seventy-five percent of Millennials surveyed in a recent study said they still pay for TV through a traditional cable or satellite company, according to Verizon Digital Media Services ("the company’s cloud video unit," not affiliated with its Fios network, but still....) "And most (64%) also pay for an online streaming subscription, versus 33% of surveyed non-Millennials," writes Jeff Baumgartner. "Only 14% of the Millennials surveyed said they had never watched TV from an online source, versus 44% among non-Millennials." Read the whole story...

  • Ezra Klein Debuts Vox.com, New Media DietNew York Magazine

    Ezra Klein wants consumers to eat their vegetables. Yes, the star journalist who recently left the Washington Post to launch a new media venture at Vox Media, plans to make the "vegetables" of the news world -- those stories people don’t read despite their health value -- tastier. Previously know only as "Project X,” Klein’s site has been named Vox.com. “The editors also hint at a new format they're developing to put the news in context,” New York magazine writes of the new site.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • First Major TV Ad For Medical Marijuana Runs On Comcast NetsThe Verge

    What's reportedly the first-ever major TV commercial for medical marijuana has begun running on Comcast networks including CNN, ESPN, Comedy Central, AMC, and Discovery, in New Jersey and Chicago this week. The spot, for MarijuanaDoctors.com, will air in Massachusetts next week, writes Jacob Kastrenakes. Read the whole story...

  • NewsmaxTV To Launch In June As 'Kinder, Gentler Fox'Bloomberg Businessweek

    This June will see the launch of NewsmaxTV, a 24-hour cable news channel designed as "a kinder, gentler Fox," says Christopher Ruddy, CEO and founder of conservative media company Newsmax Media. “Our goal is to be a little more boomer-oriented, more information-based rather than being vituperative and polarizing,” Ruddy told writer Karl Taro Greenfeld. Read the whole story...

  • 'NY Times' To Launch News Digest, Recipe AppsThe Telegraph

    The New York Times will debut three digital offerings that cost less than a full digital subscription in the next few months,  including a news digest app and a recipe app, in what the paper's head of digital products calls an "unbundling” of the paper, writes Christopher Williams. Read the whole story...

  • Why Alt Weeklies Should SurviveThe New York Times

    While local alternative weekly newspapers are fading out, either dead (like The Boston Phoenix) or seriously changed after being bought by a larger corporation (like New York City's Village Voice), they definitely still fulfill a need, writes Baynard Woods, a senior editor at the Baltimore City Paper. Alt weeklies "report on the cultural life of a city in a way that neither big daily papers nor websites can." Read the whole story...

  • CBS To Launch Dynamic Ad Program For On-Demand ShowsBloomberg

    CBS will begin selling new dynamic ads for shows being seen on-demand three days after their broadcast with original ads. These commercials  "will appear on Comcast and Time Warner Cable Inc. systems in a few weeks, followed shortly by Cox Communications Inc. and Bright House Networks LLC," writes Andy Fixmer. NBC and Fox already insert new ads into on-demand shows, "giving marketers the flexibility to change commercials on short notice." Read the whole story...

  • Is Digital Privacy A Luxury?The New York Times

    As it turns outs, privacy is not an inalienable right, and, to get it, U.S. consumers will have to pay an ever increasing premium. Yes, that’s the new reality of American life, according to reporter and author Julia Angwin. “In our data-saturated economy, privacy is becoming a luxury good,” Angwin writes in the opinion pages of The New York Times. “After all, as the saying goes, if you aren’t paying for the product, you are the product … And currently, we aren’t paying for very much of our technology.”
               

    Read the whole story...

  • 'Washington Post' Close To Running Native Ads In Print EditionAdweek

    The Washington Post is close to selling a version of its native ad program, WP BrandConnect, "that will run in the printed newspaper," and is running the first campaign -- for PhRMA, the pharmaceutical industry trade group -- that will appear as part of newspaper's mobile news stream, writes Lucia Moses. BrandConnect is  "adopting the multimedia, longform template" long used in editorial features, though it will be labeled sponsored content and "use a different background color and font from the newsroom's," adds Moses. Read the whole story...

  • Limited Print Edition Of 'Newsweek' To Go On SaleThe New York Times

    Real print copies of Newsweek will be back on the newsstands on Friday, priced at a far-from-cheap $7.99 per issue. The mag's current publisher, IBT Media, is positioning it as a "luxury product" meant to support the digital edition with a modest print run of 70,000 copies per issue, says Etienne Uzac, one of IBT's founders. Read the whole story...

  • Allstate To Sponsor CNN Docuseries With Native-Like AdsVariety

    In a sort of TV take on native advertising, Allstate will sponsor "Chicagoland," an eight-part documentary set to premiere on CNN later this week, with ads shot to look like they're "in the fabric" of the show, as a director of marketing at the insurance company notes. "In the first ad break, Tom Wilson, Allstate’s chairman, president and CEO, will appear and talk directly to viewers about the program," writes Brian Steinberg. Read the whole story...

  • FCC Fines NBCU, ESPN, Viacom $1.9M For Airing Spot With Emergency Alert SoundsTVTechnology

    The Federal Communications Commission fined NBCU, ESPN and Viacom a total of $1.9 million for running an ad on their networks  for the movie "Olympus Has Fallen that used the warning sounds of the nationwide Emergency Alert System -- a strict no-no according to FCC rules. Read the whole story...

  • Why Companies Can't Rely On Acquisitions AloneFast Company

    Whether its social, video, or programmatic technology, acquisitions are often the best way for firms to round out and update their marketing services. According to Om Malik, however, long-term success requires a willingness to build from within. “The strategy today is simple,” Malik writes in Fast Company. “In order to move fast, build what you can't buy or risk losing control of your fate and becoming the next Palm, Motorola, or HTC.”
     


    Read the whole story...

  • Survey: More Americans Would Rather Give Up TV Than InternetMashable

    More Americans would rather give up TV than the Internet, with 46% in a new Pew Research study saying that the Web would be the hardest technology for them to forego, with cell phones no. 2 and TV the third. That's a change from a few years ago, when TV was the no. 1 item Americans refused to give up. Read the whole story...

  • ESPN Debuts 15 College Conference ChannelsVariety

    ESPN is launching 15 national channels for that same number of college athletic conferences, "stocked with live events and on-demand replays – streamed over the Internet, initially to Apple TV and Roku devices," writes Todd Spangler. Read the whole story...

  • 'Food&Wine' Launches FWx, Site For MillennialsAdweek

    Time Inc.'s Food & Wine mag is introducing a site targeted to Millennials, FWx, "designed responsively with smartphones in mind, with a heavy emphasis on content related to eating and going out," writes Lucia Moses. Contributors include less-traditional folks like "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" writer Noah Kaufman. Read the whole story...

  • Amazon Music Coming Soon (Or Not)Re/code

    Rumored for some time, Amazon is reportedly closer than ever to launching a music service. Amazon is engaged in “more serious talks” with big music labels about a Spotify-like music subscription service -- which would likely tie into its Prime delivery service -- sources tell Re/Code. Yet, “one label source reports that Amazon isn’t close to getting a deal done, because its executives are asking for a substantial discount on the pricing the labels have given to other services.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Analysis: TV Execs Must Be Cheering Non-Obscure Oscar NomsThe New Yorker

    After some years of obscure movies being feted during the Academy Awards, TV executives should be happy about the slate of nominees up for Best Picture and Best Actor nominations in Sunday's telecast: "We now have nine good movies jostling for Best Picture; we have a cluster of major stars" and "a box-office that is worthy of the occasion," writes Anthony Lane. His slightly tongue-in-cheek analysis of the Oscars begins with a snappy lead well worth reading, all about a deer urinating on Adam Sandler's face (trust us; you gotta be there). Read the whole story...

  • Netflix Revenue Higher Than Many Cable Channels (Not HBO, Yet)Re/code

    Netflix, which "makes no bones about the fact that it wants to be HBO," is actually "closing in on the pay channel, at least in terms of revenue: Last year, Netflix’s streaming business generated $3.5 billion, while HBO made $4.9 billion from subscription fees," writes Peter Kafka. And Netflix revenue already outpaces that of other big cable channels, such as AMC, Starz and Showtime. Read the whole story...

  • Icahn Turns Up Heat On EBayBusiness Insider

    Activist investor Carl Icahn is stepping up his efforts to shake up eBay. In a new letter, “Icahn goes after board member Scott Cook -- who runs a company that Ichan argues is a competitor,” Business Insider reports. As Icahn writes, “Having Mr. Cook on the board while planning PayPal’s future is akin to having Pete Carroll, coach of the Seattle Seahawks, sitting in when the Denver Broncos were constructing their game plan for the Super Bowl (then again, maybe he did).”
      Read the whole story...

  • Get Up To Speed On Don Draper's Journey In Two Minutes!Adweek

    Getting excited about the return of AMC's "Mad Men" April 13? Then watch this network promo that nicely encapsulates the key moments  of the show, including a glimpse of dearly departed Lane Pryce -- and, in what we'd call a sexist bit of cropping, only the naked back and then spread legs of Linda Cardellini's Sylvia. (But, hey, one could argue that she's functioning here as sexual plot device, so that's all that's required.) Read the whole story...

  • Agencies Will Help Brands Tweet During OscarsAdweek

    Yes, there will be branded tweets during Sunday's Academy Awards broadcast. "A quick poll of agencies showed that they'll be helping many more clients attempt real-time this weekend compared to '13," writes Christopher Heine. "And their performance on the Twitter stage could influence real-time marketing budgets for the rest of the year." Read the whole story...

  • Why Web Sites Are Going Grid CrazyThe Atlantic Wire

    The “White Text on Gray Rectangles School” of news site design is having of a moment, The Atlantic observes. But, it’s not because the layout is particularly responsive, according to Ethan Marcotte, whom The Atlantic considers the godfather of responsive Web design. Rather, “the grid … lets [publishers] ‘promote’ many stories above the fold -- to showcase the work of many writers on the Web site’s most prominent page.” Plus, “the grid also looks like some popular social networks.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Who'll Be In Oscars' 'Memoriam' Sequence? Tougher Call Than Usual The Wrap

    It's a tougher year than usual for making the always-controversial decision of who will be featured in the Academy Awards' "In Memoriam" sequence honoring those who died, since the list includes 27 deceased Oscar nominees and winners -- and time allows for only about 30 folks to be included, which could mean leaving out "two past presidents of the Academy, a producer who is tied for the most Best Picture wins of all time... and the man whose name is on the theater in which the Oscars are held," writes Steve Pond. Read the whole story...

  • 'Self' Mag Debuts Branded Frozen Food LineAdweek

    Self magazine is launching a line of branded frozen foods: "eight health-conscious entrées" that "aspire to be high-end" in keeping with parent company Condé Nast's heritage, so are priced at around $4.99, writes Emma Bazilian. Yep, it's a first for the glossy publisher.  The Self Healthy Kitchen Line, a partnership with Benevida Foods CEO and chef Calvin Harris, "is rolling out to 2,900 stores across 37 states, including Kroger, Stop & Shop and Whole Foods' Northwest locations," according to Bazilian. Read the whole story...

  • Time Inc.'s 'All You' Expands Newsstand Distribution Beyond WalmartAdweek

    In April All You, a Time Inc. women's magazine, is expanding its distribution outside of Walmart, where it was on sale exclusively for 10 years, to outlets including Barnes & Noble, Target and Kroger. The pub also raised its rate base by 50,000 copies. Read the whole story...

  • Roku Mulls IPOBloomberg

    Roku, which makes set-top boxes connecting TVs to the Internet, is "weighing an initial public offering in the U.S. this year, according to people with knowledge of the matter," writes Bloomberg reporters. No formal decision has been made yet, but "Roku recently spoke with banks about the possibility of doing an IPO." Read the whole story...

  • 'New York' Mag Publishes First Biweekly IssueWomen's Wear Daily

    The first biweekly edition of New York magazine is on newsstands today, launching a regular six-page fashion spread. That's the only specific change mentioned in this interview with magazine Editor In Chief Adam Moss, who notes that “The decision to go biweekly was just a moment when we rethought the whole magazine. And to say we rethought the whole magazine isn’t to say we changed the whole magazine, but we did think about every part of it." Read the whole story...

  • NBC Orders Jennifer Lopez Series For 2015 SeasonThe Hollywood Reporter

    "Shades of Blue," a drama starring Jennifer Lopez and produced by Ryan Seacrest, is going straight to broadcast for the 2015-16 season at NBC. The network ordered 13 episodes of the show about "a single mother and dirty cop recruited to work undercover for the FBI's anti-corruption task force," according to The Hollywood Reporter. Read the whole story...

  • 'Maxim' Sues Darden For Bungled Buyout AttemptNew York Post

    Alpha Media Group, Maxim's parent company, is suing media mogul Calvin Darden Sr. "over the $31 million buyout of the glossy men’s mag that was bungled by his alleged scammer son," writes New York Post reporters. "The $38 million suit follows last week’s arrest of Darden’s son, 39-year-old Calvin Darden Jr. by the Feds." Read the whole story...

  • Ads With Same-Sex Couples Abound, Some Making Tolerance Message During OlympicsNew York Times

    February has been a big month for debuts of ad campaigns featuring same-sex couples, from a Banana Republic print ad to the Coca-Cola spot that aired both during the Super Bowl and opposite the opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics. That placement, along with two Chevrolet Olympics ads featuring same-sex couples, were presumably meant to send a message of inclusion opposed to the Russian government's anti-gay policy -- though a spokesperson for the Gay and Lesbian Alliances Against Defamation said Olympics sponsors could have gone further and made a direct message condemning Russian policies. Read the whole story...

  • Amazon Readying Set-Top BoxRe/code

    As expected, Amazon is reportedly readying its own Web TV box, which will run Google’s Android operating system. “Amazon is gearing up to take on Apple and Roku, again,” Re/Code reports, citing sources. Competing directly with Apple and Roku, “An Amazon box will allow its customers to easily watch [Amazon content] stuff on their TVs.” An Amazon set-top box was originally expected to launch, last year.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Independent Cable Nets Divided On Comcast MergerAdweek

    Everybody else has chimed in with reactions to the Comcast-Time Warner Cable deal, so here are opinions from an industry segment very directly affected: independent cable channels, which will each "have to negotiate [with the larger entity] on their own individual merits," writes Sam Thielman. Ovation, which was dropped by Time Warner Cable for a while, is in favor of the deal, while health and lifestyle network Veria Living is less happy: "I think there needs to be an aggressive approach from the government in putting conditions on this merger," says Eric Sherman, Veria CEO. Read the whole story...

  • 'NY Times' Eliminates Programmatic Ad Director JobAdvertising Age

    The New York Times' first programmatic advertising director, Matt Prohaska, has been let go, noting that his job "has been eliminated," reports Tim Peterson. Prohaska was hired less than a year ago. "His exit is a bit surprising given The New York Times' embrace of automated ad sales under advertising boss Meredith Kopit Levien," writes Peterson. Stiil, the paper "has also embraced new so-called native ads that appear to be the polar opposite of ads sold programmatically." Read the whole story...

  • Content Pirates Rolling In Ad DollarsVentureBeat

    Last year, Web sites that specialize in pirated content took home about a quarter of a billion dollars in advertising, according to a new report from the Digital Citizens Alliance. More startling still, “The 30 largest pirate sites -- the report focused on movie and TV content -- will make an average of $4.4 million annually from ads,” Venture Beat reports, citing the DCA’s data. “Since their content is priceless, literally, these sites can have profit margins in the vicinity of 80 percent to 94 percent.”


    Read the whole story...

  • GQ Mulling Retail VenturesWomen's Wear Daily

    Conde Nast's GQ magazine's partnerships with various retailers, most recently men’s wear pop-up market Northern Grade, is part of a larger effort to expand revenue streams, with "perhaps an e-commerce or brick-and-mortar grab" in the future, writes Alexandra Steigrad. Read the whole story...

  • In Defense Of Hard PaywallsColumbia Journalism Review

    Though increasingly rare, “hard paywalls” -- which deny readers even a taste of digital content without paying subscription fees -- can work. Take The Times of London, which -- along with sister paper The Sunday Times -- have 153,000 digital subscribers paying upwards of $10 a week. “That adds up, very roughly, to $60 million a year in paywall revenue,” Ryan Chittum writes in The Audit, Columbia Journalism Reviews’ business section. “And digital subscribers are still growing at a healthy clip, up 38% from two years ago.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Fosun Likely To Buy 'Forbes' For Less Than $250MThe Deal

    Chinese conglomerate Fosun International Ltd., front-runner to buy Forbes Media, will most likely pay "a much lower price than private equity minority stakeholder Elevation Partners LP was hoping to receive" -- probably less than $250 million for the magazine, writes Jonathan Marino.

    Read the whole story...

  • Vice/FremantleMedia Forge Foodie BrandVariety

    Expanding into new territory, Vice Media and FremantleMedia are co-creating a multichannel food platform for millennials. “Initially, the [joint venture] will be a Web channel on Vice, but the project is structured to leverage FremantleMedia’s position to sell the content to TV networks globally,” Variety reports. “The Vice food vertical will comprise a mix of video, articles, how-tos, recipes and events.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • New Approach To Figure Skating Coverage Brings Good Ratings For NBCAwfulAnnouncing.com

    NBC is getting positive early ratings for its new-this-year approach to covering figure skating in the Winter Olympics: airing all the performances in the competitions during the day, and selective taped coverage in prime time, with a different set of announcers for each daypart, reports Ken Fang. He also reviews the performance of the new announcers, who include former Olympics skaters Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir -- whom he calls "delightful." Read the whole story...

  • AP Microsites Shine During Winter OlympicsPoynter

    The AP’s ongoing efforts to provide members with white-label sports-based microsites are reaching new heights with the Winter Olympics in Sochi. “Around 600 news organizations -- mostly newspapers but also radio and TV stations -- are taking advantage of customizable, AP-hosted Web content for the Olympics,” Poynter reports. “Each news outlet with an AP membership can add AP widgets to its homepage or sports page, and those widgets link to an individually branded microsite containing AP content.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Bravo Orders Its First Scripted SeriesThe Wrap

    Bravo ordered the series "Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce,” starring former  "House" star Lisa Edelstein, as its first scripted show. So far two other attempts at the scripted genre so far have not worked out for the cabler known for its reality shows. Read the whole story...

  • Studios Spend Lavishly In Final Ad Push For Oscar-Nominated FilmsThe Wrap

    In the final weeks of the race to win Academy Awards, movie studios are spending lavishly on ads for both Best Picture  -- and even on "campaigns like the one for 'Despicable Me 2,' which received animated-feature and original-song nominations," writes Steve Pond. In fact, "one veteran of the Oscar wars estimates that this could be the most expensive year ever..." In his post, Pond also decodes the messages in these final ad campaigns -- like "Marty and Leo kick butt" for "The Wolf of Wall Street." Read the whole story...

  • CBS Orders 'CSI' Spinoff Focused On CybercrimeVulture/New York Magazine

    Cybercrime will be the topic of a new spinoff of CBS' "CSI" franchise. Not sure if this is the official name, but Margaret Lyons floated "CSI: The Internet" in her report. Read the whole story...

  • Google To Glass Users: Don't Be A "Glasshole!"Cnet

    Google is investing ample resourses into Glass, so it doesn’t want a few “glassholes” -- people who use the headgear to annoying and/or creepy ends -- ruining it for everyone. Trying to curb such bad behavior, Google has released an etiquette guide for Glass “explorers,” i.e., beta-testers. “Respect others and if they have questions about Glass don’t get snappy,” Google suggests. In the words of CNet’s Chris Matyszczy: “Google is keen to help the nerds assimilate with the world as it sadly is.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • 'Hadar,' Fashion Pub For Orthodox Jewish Woman, Set To Publish JNS.org

    Who knew? The third edition of "Hadar," (English translation: "Glorious"), an upscale fashion magazine for Orthodox Jewish women, is coming out "just after Purim," (after March 16), "available for $3.99 in stores throughout the New York/New Jersey area and for purchase online," writes Maayan Jaffee. Owner/content director Bari Weizman is "reaching out to and sometimes securing national advertisers." Read the whole story...

  • Disney To Buy Discovery? Comcast Deal Could Accelerate More Cable Biz M&A The New York Times

    Comcast's purchase of Time Warner Cable, announced last week, would create a behemoth that "could touch off a once-in-a-generation frenzy of deal-making," among cable networks and other cable operators, writes David Gelles. Among the possibilities discussed here: Disney buying Discovery, Viacom "consumed into a larger entity,” according to an analyst, and other cable operators like Charter, Cox and Cablevision consolidating. Read the whole story...

  • Google, Apple Eye Wearable Tech Maker Basic ScienceTechCrunch

    Trying to fortify their wearable tech efforts, Apple and Google are reportedly eying Basis Health Tracker Watch maker Basic Science. “We’ve heard that the company has been shopping itself around over the past few weeks and has spoken to Google, Apple and possibly Samsung and Microsoft about a potential sale,” TechCrunch reports. “The price we’ve heard for any possible activity is ‘sub-hundred million.’”
     

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  • How Big Are GoPro's Media Ambitions?Engadget

    While its brand is synonymous with a little block of hardware, GoPro’s greater ambitions are to establish itself as a media giant. “It's got all the hallmarks of a burgeoning media company, which is no panacea, but it's certainly an area that sets the stage for ongoing expansion,” Engadget reports, noting the parallels between GoPro and brand-cum-media maven Red Bull. “At the moment, GoPro curates everything on its channel -- but it's clearly aware of the large, untapped store of media out there.”
     

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  • New Comcast Deal Might Hurt Cord-CuttersThe New York Times

    "But can cord cutters truly escape the cord? And are they, in fact, saving much money at all?" "No" would seem to be the answer to both these questions, especially in light of last week's announcement that Comcast would be buying Time Warner Cable, writes Farhad Manjoo. "Critics of the... deal argue that it will eventually give Comcast the power to raise prices for its broadband and cable TV services and especially to hold its Internet-only subscription prices so close to its TV-and-Internet prices that few people will see much use in declaring their cable independence." Read the whole story...

  • Pandora Targeting Ads By Political PreferenceThe Wall Street Journal

    Next week, Pandora is expected to start letting advertisers target listeners based on their perceived political leanings. To do so, “The company matches election results with subscribers' musical preferences by Zip Code,” The Wall Street Journal reports. “Then, it labels individual users based on their musical tastes and whether those artists are more frequently listened to in Democratic or Republican areas.”
     

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  • Yahoo Buys Video Platform DistillComputerworld

    Yahoo just bought collaborative video interview platform Distill. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but it mostly likely required a little pocket change from Yahoo. Now, “the staff from Distill will be working at Yahoo in mobile advertising,” Computerworld reports. “The Distill staff said they will be drawing on their expertise from their stint at Tapjoy ‘to help build out Yahoo's mobile advertising solutions.’”
     

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  • 'The Week' Licenses Middle East EditionMedia Week

    The Week is licensing a Middle East edition of itself with United Arab Emirates publisher Motivate. The company already publishes a U.S. and U.K. version, and shuttered an Australian edition in fall of 2012. Read the whole story...

  • How 'USA Today' Will Double Its Circulation This YearThe Wrap

    USA Today Publisher Larry Kramer says the paper will double its print circulation this year through its partnership with "Gannett’s 80 other regional papers, placing full sections of USA Today editorial content and advertising in Gannet’s top newspapers," writes Sharon Waxman. ”USA Today appearing in a local newspaper is like NBC News appearing on the local affiliates airwaves," Kramer tells Waxman, and he plans to "extend USA Today’s brand into regional newspapers not owned by Gannett." Read the whole story...

  • Are Apple, Amazon And Google Here To Stay?The New York Times

    What digital platforms and gadgets are going to survive the test of time? It’s a critical investment question for consumers and marketers alike. The New York Times’ Farhad Manjoo thinks he has the answer. Along with attention to quality, “the point is to minimize the danger of getting locked into any one company’s ecosystem,” he writes. To do so, he strongly suggesting betting on Apple for hardware, Google for digital services and Amazon for content.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Barbie To Appear In 'Sports Illustrated' Swimsuit Edit & AdAdweek

    Mattel's iconic doll Barbie will appear in both the edit and ad sections of this year's Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, posing for a feature spread as well as an advertorial centered around the doll's "new '#unapologetic' campaign, which celebrates Barbie’s (sometimes divisive) role in society," writes Emma Bazilian. Read the whole story...

  • Apple Rethinking TV PlansWall Street Journal

    Rather than license TV programming for its own Web-based TV service, Apple is reportedly working with media companies and pay TV distributors on the launch of a branded set-top box. “In the current discussions, which involve at least two big media companies, Apple envisages working with cable companies, rather than competing against them,” The Wall Street Journal reports. “For programming, it would rely on cable providers to acquire programming rights from media companies, rather than acquire them on its own.”

    Read the whole story...

  • Hearst Unveils New Corporate WebsiteMashable

    Hearst launched a revamped corporate website -- "a highly functional exercise in native self-promotion" of the company's products, not only magazines like Cosmopolitan but 29 TV stations, writes Jason Abbruzzese. Read the whole story...

  • CBS Doubles Its Hulu Plus LibraryVariety

    CBS doubled the number of episodes it's providing to Hulu Plus, to a total of 5,300 on "a multi-year, non-exclusive basis," for such series as  “Everybody Loves Raymond,” “Ghost Whisperer,” and “United States of Tara," writes Andrew Wallenstein. Read the whole story...

  • Newspapers' Decline Sign? Former 'Times' Editor's Move To Online Journalism Gawker

    The fact that former New York Times editor and columnist Bill Keller is leaving the Gray Lady to lead online journalism startup The Marshall Project "is a great flashing sign that reads, 'Newspapers are the past,'" writes Hamilton Nolan.  Still, "a former Times editor going to a news startup is a big deal. News startups realizing they shouldn't hire former newspaper editors to lead them will be a bigger deal." Read the whole story...

  • Getty Images, Leanin Create Photo Gallery Of More Powerful Women's ImagesMashable

    Getty Images and Sheryl Sandberg-co-founded Leanin.org. are partnering to launch a stock photo gallery of "2,500 images that offer more positive and powerful perceptions of women," writes Kurt Wagner. Read the whole story...

  • Report: Charter Plans Hostile Takeover Move For Time Warner CableThe Wall Street Journal

    Charter Communications will begin "one of the biggest recent hostile takeover bids" next week when it nominates "a full slate of candidates for Time Warner Cable Inc.'s 13-member board," according to plans divulged by anonymous sources cited by Wall Street Journal reporters. "Charter, the fourth largest cable operator by subscribers, has been attempting to bring Time Warner Cable, the second biggest cable company, to the negotiating table for a merger deal since late last spring." All three of Charter's offers have been rejected. Read the whole story...

  • Web Rallies To Protest FISA Improvements ActNBC News

    With the National Security Agency squarely in their sights, so-called Web freedom activists are "planning a day of protest against mass surveillance," on Tuesday. “In a movement called ‘The Day We Fight Back,’ thousands of Web sites will host a banner urging people to call Congress in opposition to the FISA Improvements Act, which was approved by the Senate Intelligence Committee and its chairman, Sen. Diane Feinstein (D-Calif.),” NBC News reports.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Conde Nast Invests In Programmatic Platform iSocketAdweek

    Condé Nast is investing in programmatic buying platform iSocket -- a sign that "traditional publishers are getting even deeper into automated buying," writes Emma Bazilian. "ISocket revealed today that it has received $5 million in new funding led by Time Warner Investments and Condé Nast..." Read the whole story...

  • Icahn Drops Apple Stock-Buyback PushLos Angeles Times

    Carl Icahn still believes that Apple should redistribute its wealth, but, at least the time being, the famed investor will no long push the matter with shareholders. As such, Icahn said he was dropping his shareholder proposal that would have asked Apple to buy back $50 billion of stock this year. “The move came after an influential advisory firm, Institutional Shareholder Services, weighed in on the debate by telling shareholders they should vote against Icahn's proposal,” the Los Angeles Times reports.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • 'WWD' Uses Google Glass To Report On NY Fashion WeekWomen's Wear Daily

    Women's Wear Daily reporters will be wearing Google Glass to cover New York Fashion Week, which will "allow the team to capture videos on the fly and create other interactive content, including GIFs, from behind the scenes," writes Belisa Silva. Read the whole story...

  • 'NY Times' Racks Up Three-Quarters Of A Million Digital SubscribersMediabistro

    The New York Times had 760,000 digital subscribers by 2013's Q4, with revenue from digital-only subscribers increasing 36% year-over-year. But "total revenue was essentially flat for the year," writes Chris O'Shea. Read the whole story...

  • First Look Media Launches Snowden-Focused Digital Magazine Politico

    First Look Media, the new journalism venture backed by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, will launch its first digital magazine next week. Omidyar announced on his web site that it's initial focus will be "in-depth reporting on the classified documents previously provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden." The new site will be led by journalists including Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras and Jeremy Scahill. Read the whole story...

  • CNN Shuts Down CNN LatinoYahoo! News

    CNN is shuttering the year-old CNN Latino, the eight-hour programming block of news and lifestyle content targeted to Hispanics, because it failed to reach "business expectations," according to the company. Read the whole story...

  • 'Seventeen' Relaunches YouTube ChannelVariety

    Seventeen magazine is relaunching its YouTube Seventeen Channel with original content from five YouTube personalities, as well as "introducing a related multichannel network for fan-contributed content," writes Todd Spangler. Read the whole story...

  • How Lame Is 'NY Times' Op-Ed Dept.?New York Observer

    Pretty lame, according to this scathing attack on the Times' editorial department -- a topic that seems oddly timely, considering one of the most hotly debated topics this week was a letter published under the purview of that department: Dylan Farrow's accusation that Woody Allen molested her. Meanwhile, Times executive editor Jill Abramson defends the department, as quoted at length in a post in Capital New York. Read the whole story...

  • How New 'Good Housekeeping' Editor Will Update Veteran PubAdvertising Age

    Jane Francisco, brought in as editor last November to "evolve" the 129-year-old Good Housekeeping, has already revamped the cover's graphic significantly with the March issue, "infused personality into its social-media feeds," and might consider changing the pub's admittedly old-fashioned name, reports Michael Sebastian. More changes should come. Read the whole story...

  • Report: Six Big Media Firms Control TV Ad PieLos Angeles Times

    "A handful of media giants control the advertising and subscription pies" in the TV biz, an unsurprising conclusion from a new report by Sanford C. Bernstein analyst Todd Juenger. Top six in ad revenue, in order: NBC (with about 20% of the $37 billion market), Disney (17%), Fox (12%), CBS (11%), Viacom (11%) and Time Warner (10%).

    Read the whole story...

  • Time Inc. Begins Second Round Of LayoffsAdvertising Age

    Time Inc. began its second round of anticipated staff layoffs on Tuesday, Feb. 4. "The ultimate number of cuts will be less than 500, according to a person familiar with the process," writes Michael Sebastian. Among those leaving: David Geithner, exec VP-president of the Style and Entertainment Group, and Ed Kelly, CEO of American Express Publishing, Read the whole story...

  • Big Oscar Spenders -- Hyundai, Pepsi -- Drop Out Of This Year's TelecastAdweek

    Hyundai and Coca-Cola  have backed out of sponsoring the Academy Awards this year, after lengthy tenures (five years for the carmaker, eight years for the beverage giant) as exclusive, top-spending advertisers in their categories, according to Anthony Crupi. But these spots were snapped up in short order for the March 2 telecast by General Motors and Pepsi, sources say. Read the whole story...

  • Why Big Live Events Like Super Bowl Are Bound To Grow Ratings

    "At a time of atomization in which we all end up down the hobbit holes of our special interests, big live television fulfills" a real human need for group connection, writes David Carr -- a  prime reason why a few events like the Super Bowl, the Grammys and the Oscars have grown ratings each year,  "even as network ratings have dropped 29 percent over the last decade." Read the whole story...

  • Report: Disney, Dish, Close To Settling Ad-Skipping SuitBloomberg

    Walt Disney Co. is close to settling a lawsuit over Dish Network's ad skipping technology, which "could make ad-skipping a regular feature of TV viewing, and ease the tension between Dish and other programmers," according to anonymous sources cited by Bloomberg reporters. "By agreeing to let Dish customers skip ads on ABC network programs they have recorded, Disney could receive higher monthly subscriber fees." Read the whole story...

  • 'Outside' Magazine Forms Travel DivisonFolio

    Mariah Media's Outside magazine is debuting Outside GO, a division that will book adventure travel trips in partnership with the company Uncharted Outposts. "Destinations and adventure travel are a big editorial category for Outside, making the travel business a somewhat natural revenue extension for the brand," writes Bill Mickey. Read the whole story...

  • Report: Time Inc. To Shut Down 'Executive Travel' MagSkift

    Time Inc. is shuttering Executive Travel, according to reports from Skift, in a move "consistent with press speculation about a large round of layoffs on both the editorial and business sides of Time Inc. titles prior to this spin off," writes Jason Clampet. The high-end travel mag, previously published six times a year, was acquired from American Express Publishing in October. Read the whole story...

  • Lawsuit Could Kill Conservative Pub 'National Review' The Week

    The almost-60-year-old conservative pub National Review is facing a lawsuit by climate scientist Michael Mann that threatens its survival, writes Damon Linker. Though the magazine "enjoys circulation roughly equivalent to that of The Nation, the American Left's leading journal of opinion, and more than twice that of William Kristol's The Weekly Standard, its primary competition on the Right," it lacks a legal budget large enough to pay a substantial settlement or penalty if it loses the suit. Read the whole story...

  • Versa Launches Sponsored Op-Ed NetworkTechCrunch

    In another sign that news media ain’t what it used to be, a startup named Versa is launching a network for “sponsored” op-eds. Making its “Featured Perspectives” service possible, Versa just raised additional capital from The Omidyar Network, and other investors. As TechCrunch reports, Versa previously went by the name ElectNext, and specialized in publisher widgets that displayed contextual political data.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Print Coupons Still Beat Digital Deals In Moms' StudyAdweek

    Moms are still looking to print rather than digital media for special deals, with 78% of moms surveyed by Womensforum.com depending on print ads and 65% on supermarket circulars to find coupons. Meanwhile, 55% "said they often get coupons online, too," writes Christopher Heine. Read the whole story...

  • 'NY Times' Faces Video Quandary: Still Not Enough Content Capital New York

    The New York Times' digital video department "has become an essential component of the company's growth strategy," but is facing a dilemma: "When you're in the business of the type of video that attracts advertisers who pay the big bucks, creating inventory turns out to be an extremely resource-intensive and time-consuming endeavor. Demand can therefore outpace supply," writes Joe Pompeo. Last year, in fact, the pub failed to deliver content for two big video deals -- one with Acura and the other with Microsoft. Pompeo surveys the problem and how the company is aiming to solve it. Read the whole story...

  • Last.fm Taps Spotify For Track PlayerCnet

    Last.fm, CBS Interactive’s Web radio unit, has tapped Spotify to offer users an on-demand track player. Per the pact, Spotify’s playbar is being added to the bottom of Last.fm's site, “where users can play and control any song in Spotify's catalog,” CNet reports. “The inability to play entire catalogs of artists -- something that requires onerous negotiations with labels to reach expensive licensing deals -- has long been a missing link of Last.fm's discovery service.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Hale Global Guts Patch StaffJimRomenesko

    Not wasting any time, Hale Global -- which recently bought a majority stake in Patch from AOL -- has reportedly laid off nearly two-thirds of the service’s editorial staff. And that may be a best-case scenario, considering that some Patch employees are suggesting to Romenesko that 90% of Patch staff are getting kicked to the curb. “Patch senior vice president/revenue Jim Lipuma has also left the company,” Romenesko reports. Officially, Hale Global and AOL created a joint venture to run Patch.
     


    Read the whole story...

  • Comcast Enjoys Steep Rise In Profits, Subscriber Increases The New York Times

    Good news for Comcast in its Q4 returns: The cable provider and owner of NBCUniversal tracked a 26% increase in net income compared to 2012 numbers, to a total of $1.9 billion. And for the first time in more than 26 quarters, it added 43,000 TV subscribers, reversing a longtime downward spiral. "Comcast’s results met or exceeded estimates across most of its units," writes Ravi Somaiya. Read the whole story...

  • Mag Tracks 1.25M Uniques, Aims For West-Coast Thought-Leader StatusColumbia Journalism Review

    Six-year-old magazine Pacific Standard is tracking its best-ever month of online traffic, 1.25 million unique views, with readers drawn to two different stories, one on online harassment of women, the other a human-interest/trend feature about artisanal toast. Sara Laskow profiles the print and online pub, which aims to overturn the idea that "thought-leader magazines get published on the East Coast, and that’s that." Read the whole story...

  • Apple's TV Ambitions Take Shape9to5Mac

    Still no sign of an actual TV set, but big things are happening within Apple’s TV division. Apple’s Online Store just added an entire Apple TV section, while “the Apple TV is now promoted as a full product line alongside Macs, iPads, iPods, and iPhones,” 9To5Mac reports. The company is also reportedly working on a new set-top-box, “If Apple were to launch such a product in the near-future, it would make sense for it to have a dedicated, unhidden spot on Apple’s online store,” 9To5 reasons.
      Read the whole story...

  • Dish, DirecTV Team Up To Sell Custom Political AdsReuters

    Satellite TV competitors Dish and DirecTV are partnering to sell customized political ads, using technology that lets them "send one commercial to a 50-year-old swing voter in Florida, while a neighbor would be beamed a different commercial at the same time even if both people were watching the same program," writes Liana B. Baker. In other words, addressable ads -- which could be sold as early as February "in the lead up to the midterm elections in November," writes Baker. Read the whole story...

  • OMG: 'O' Mag Without Oprah On The Cover?Mediabistro

    According to reports, Oprah Winfrey is considering retiring her post as permanent cover model for Hearst's O magazine -- an idea that causes some fun reactions from commentators here. Then there's this critique on a possible Oprah replacement: " If the publication does indeed choose to 'decorate big letter O’s, depending on the month,' they’re not trying hard enough," writes Richard Horgan. Read the whole story...

  • Some Game Companies Pay For Mention On 'Conan,' But Don't Disclose Deal Re/code

    Some videogame companies were paying to be featured in Conan O'Brien's "Clueless Gamer" reviews during his TBS late-night talk show, but that fact was not disclosed to the audience because the segments "are not serious reviews nor endorsements — they are strictly comedic sketches,” according to a "Conan" spokesperson questioned by Eric Johnson. In this post, Johnson delves into the ramifications of this finding, concluding that because TBS is owned by Time Warner Inc, which is not a cable operator per se, "it’s not clear how the FCC could take action, even if it got a complaint." Read the whole story...

  • Ezra Klein's New Vox Venture Has Its SkepticsReuters

    Not everyone is sharing in the enthusiasm over Ezra Klein’s decision to launch a new online property under Vox Media. “The Web -- so elemental in making Ezra Klein a big and sudden success -- is also his biggest threat,” Jack Shafer opines on Reuters.com. “Had Klein housed his new operation in a place like ESPN, where Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight now resides, I would be expressing more optimism about his future,” he adds. “ESPN occupies the safest moat in all of media, and as long as Silver anchors his enterprise in its waters, he will be safe.”
      Read the whole story...

  • Longform Journalism's Next Step: The Story Becomes Publishing Unit?Medium

    "The world needs a new way of publishing and distributing longform journalism," writes Hamish McKenzie. He suggests that "publishers need to shift their emphasis to individual story units," with stories themselves becoming "platforms. Once the story is realized as the central force for reader attention, you can build an experience around it. That experience might include ads, but it might also include software applications, shopping opportunities, financial transactions, and donations." Read the whole story...

  • Report: Olympics Ad Revenue Could Top $1BAdweek

    A Kantar Media report estimates overall ad sales revenue from the Sochi Olympics could add up to a record $1.05 billion, but several factors need to pan out first. First off, "that as many as 11,000 30-second units [are] carved out of the Sochi coverage," writes Anthony Crupi. Current sales numbers? NBC recently "said that it has sold north of $800 million in Olympic ads, adding that it will hold back an undisclosed percentage of available inventory as a hedge against make-goods." Read the whole story...

  • Grammy Ads Hit Record High Of Almost $1M ApieceBillboard

    Ads for Sunday's Grammys telecast sold for a record high of almost $1 million for a 30-second spot. (OK, that sounds low compared to the $4 million average for a Super Bowl spot -- but still, not exactly chicken feed.) "CBS sold 90% of the ad inventory during its upfront marketplace over the summer to advertisers for an average of $800,000 to $850,000, according to five executives familiar with this year’s buying market," writes Andrew Hampp. Read the whole story...

  • 'NYPost' Pegs Digital Strategist As PresidentCapital New York

    The New York Post’s Grade-A gossip has never been more popular online. In fact, "[It] was a record month for nypost.com and pagesix.com," the Post’s publisher Jesse Angelo told staff in a new memo obtained by Capital. “We saw 14.4 million unique users across desktop and mobile for the month -- up from the previous record of 12.1 million.” The revelation was included in Angelo’s announcement that he is bringing on digital strategist David Brinker as president of the newspaper.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Vox Media Scores Ezra KleinThe New York Times

    Representing a real coup for Vox Media, the publisher of SB Nation and The Verge is bringing on The Washington Post wunderkind Ezra Klein to launch a new title. David Carr sees the move as a “parable of Old Media cluelessness -- allowing a journalism asset to escape who will come back to haunt them.” After years of second-class citizenship, Carr suggests that pure digital media companies like Vox are finally earning the respect of the media establishment.
      Read the whole story...

  • 'USA Today' Expands Analysis Of Ads In Super Bowl MeterAdweek

    Partnering with Adobe, USA Today is "adding a layer of analysis" to its Super Bowl Ad Meter program, created in 1989 "to gauge consumers’ responses to TV’s most expensive ads," writes Lucia Moses. This year, results from the viewer voting pool "will be sliced and diced by characteristics including gender, age, geography and household income," writes Moses. Read the whole story...

  • Fox To Test First Super Bowl Streaming AppSports Business Daily

    Super Bowl XLVIII will be the first such game to be streamed through an app, available as a mobile feature of FoxSportsGo.com.  "Like prior Super Bowl streaming efforts by NBC and CBS, Fox will run separate commercials during the live game stream while also offering digital replays of the televised ads," writes Eric Fisher. "Network officials declined to specify ad rates for the digital ads." Read the whole story...

  • Apple Prepping New TV Set-Top-Box9to5Mac

    While the tech world awaits word of an actual Apple television set, the company is reportedly readying a new Apple TV set-top-box. “We are led to believe that the new device, which is said to be a set-top box rather than a full-fledged TV set, will likely be introduced in the first half of 2014,” 9To5Mac reports. “Our sources previously indicated that Apple is experimenting with new input methods for TV-related products, such as motion controls, but it is unclear if that Kinect-like interface is in the cards for this year’s Apple TV product.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Agency Owners Bullish On Acquiring Analytics Firms, Cool To Ad Tech DealsAdweek

    Ad agency and media owners would much rather buy analytics companies than ad tech firms, according to an annual survey by AdMedia Partners. Only 27% of respondents said they wanted to acquire tech companies, as opposed to 61% expressing interest in analytics firms. Read the whole story...

  • TV Icon Bill Cosby To Develop NBC Family ComedyThe Hollywood Reporter

    Bill Cosby, whose "Cosby Show" garnered hit ratings and critical gold for NBC from 1984 to 1992, is re-teaming with the network and with the former producer of his show, Carsey Werner's Tom Werner, to develop a multigenerational family comedy. The show "is being eyed for development outside of the traditional pilot season window," writes Lesley Goldberg. Read the whole story...

  • Time Warner Cable's CEO Stands Firm On Company's Purchase PriceMultichannel News

    Time Warner Cable CEO Rob Marcus is "not negotiating” on terms for the company's purchase, which will not go below $160 per share, he tells Mike Farrell. Last week TWC rejected a $132.50-per-share bid from Charter Communications. Read the whole story...

  • Amazon Exploring Web TV ServiceThe Wall Street Journal

    Amazon is reportedly readying a Web TV service, and has already floated the idea with top networks about licensing their programs. “The new service it has discussed with media companies would offer live TV channels, such as those available now on cable or satellite TV,” The Wall Street Journal reports, citing sources. “Through its Prime Instant Video service, Amazon now offers various TV shows and movies on demand for subscribers to its Prime free-shipping service.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Hearst To Debut 'Town & Country' U.K., Delays 'Bazaar France'Women's Wear Daily

    Hearst U.K. will debut a British version of Town & Country magazine in May. Harper’s Bazaar France, originally set to launch this year, will instead premiere in 2015 "as it hunts for a new editor in chief, according to industry sources in Paris," Women's Wear Daily reporters write. Publishers for the French edition are Hearst Magazines International and Groupe Marie Claire. Read the whole story...

  • Aristotle Had Virality PeggedThe New Yorker

    As it turns, Aristotle figured out what makes content viral over 2,000 years ago. “The answer, he argued, was three principles: ethos, pathos, and logos,” Maria Konnikova writes in The New Yorker. “Content should have an ethical appeal, an emotional appeal, or a logical appeal.” Konnikova checks in on a couple of researchers at Wharton who are building on Aristotle’s original findings.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • MSNBC, Christie, Face Public Severing Of Once-Cozy BondThe New York Times

    MSNBC's formerly positive coverage of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie as "a Republican who cut against the party grain and lit up the screen with his everyman-ish, Springsteen-loving spontaneity" has, due to Bridgegate, "curdled in a spectacularly public fashion," writes Michael Barbaro and Bill Carter. "Detailed dissections of the case, and a rotating cast of indignant lawmakers from New Jersey, are now a staple of the network’s shows." Meanwhile, Christie cries foul, denouncing MSNBC as "partisan" and "almost gleeful" in its criticism of him.

    Read the whole story...

  • More Competiton For Weather Channel: AccuWeather Channel To Debut Atlanta Business Chronicle

    AccuWeather Inc. announced it will be launching a 24/7 TV channel -- a move it's been planning for a while, but decided to showcase now in light of the Weather Channel's being pulled off DirecTV due to a carriage dispute last week. Read the whole story...

  • HBO Go Coming Soon To PlayStation 3Variety

    HBO Go will be available on Sony's PlayStation 3 video game console soon, the company announced, although it did not specify exactly when. Next will be an app of the broadband video service for the just-released PS4. Read the whole story...

  • Gates Filling Leadership Vacuum At MicrosoftRe/code

    There’s no chance of Bill Gates reclaiming the CEO spot at Microsoft, but, once the company finds a replacement for Steve Ballmer, its founder is expected to play a more prominent role than in recent years. “While some investors have dropped hints in the media that he [along with Ballmer] should head for the exit … [Gates] is more likely to remain visible … as well as more active within the company,” Kara Swisher reports, citing sources. “This is no surprise given Gates’ very active mind.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Ad Regulator Criticizes 'Shape' Mag For 'News'-Labeled AdvertorialThe New York Times

    Advertising regulator National Advertising Division rebuked Shape magazine for a September advertorial labeled "news" that promoted its own product, Shape Water Boosters. The magazine “blurred the line between advertising and editorial content in a way which could confuse consumers,” according to the ruling. But "the publisher said that the ad required no disclosure because a connection between the publication and its branded products was obvious," writes Andrew Adam Newman. Read the whole story...

  • Hollywood Going All DigitalLos Angeles Times

    Stateside, Paramount Pictures just became the first big Hollywood studio to stop releasing major movies on 35-millimeter film. “The studio's Oscar-nominated film ‘The Wolf of Wall Street’ is [its] first movie in wide release to be distributed entirely in digital format,” the Los Angeles Times reports, citing industry execs. “The decision is likely to encourage other studios to follow suit, accelerating a complete phase-out of film that could come by the end of the year.”
     


    Read the whole story...

  • Ad Revenue Up 30% For Puppy Bowl, Cats To Hang Out In Sheba VIP SuiteAdvertising Age

    Ad revenue is up 30% from last year's total for The Puppy Bowl, Animal Planet's 10-year-old alternate programming to the Super Bowl -- with nine sponsors, 3 more than in 2013. The newest is AT&T. Also new is a move to appease the cat lovers: a VIP suite sponsored by Sheba cat food, where felines will be around. Read the whole story...

  • Rdio Frees Up Service (With Ads)The Next Web

    On the heels of a similar move by Spotify, Rdio is making its music streaming service free to all US Web users. “In other words, you can access the company’s over 20 million songs, as well as albums, playlists and stations from any computer without paying a dime,” The Next Web reports. In addition, “Rdio says it has added ‘in-stream messaging’ (read: ads) to its Web service.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Capital New York To Debut Monthly Print MagAdvertising Age

    Capital New York is launching a free monthly print version Jan. 27 with a small run (about 8,000 copies) distributed in Manhattan and Albany. The move "underscores a growing if limited embrace of print among digital-only media properties, with several Web sites introducing some version of a physical magazine," including Capital sibling Politico and the upcoming print revival of the presently digital-only Newsweek, writes Michael Sebastian. Read the whole story...

  • Yahoo Loses Editor-in-ChiefRe/code

    It’s turning out to be a tough week for Yahoo and CEO Marissa Mayer. Following the firing of COO Henrique De Castro -- one of Mayer’s first major hires --Yahoo’s Editor-in-Chief Jai Singh just quit. Even worse, as Kara Swisher sees it, is Mayer’s decision to put CMO Kathy Savitt in charge of the media unit. “Appointing a marketing person to be in charge of editorial is probably enough … for many journalists to run screaming.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • 'Glamour' Mag's Ad Boosts Come After Edit, Ad Staff ChangesWomen's Wear Daily

    Glamour magazine enjoyed "its strongest first quarter in five years, with advertising up 12 percent, or 34 pages, for the first quarter of 2014 versus the prior-year period," writes Alexandra Steigrad. Gains come after publisher Connie Anne Phillips "brought in five new positions on the ad side, including a luxury director, a retail director, a head of digital sales, a Detroit director and an executive director of integrated sales." And Anna Wintour, as parent Conde Nast's artistic director, made some editorial staff changes. Read the whole story...

  • Study: Combined Twitter-TV Ads 35% More Effective Than TV Ads AloneTVUSA.ws

    TV commercials work more effectively when combined with Twitter paid ads, according to a study by MarketShare. In a survey of new mobile service subscribers in the U.K., carriers that used both Twitter and TV ads averaged customer acquisition costs of $85 -- 35% better than the average new customer cost of $131 for TV ads alone.

    “Now more than ever, major brand marketers need to understand the complex interplay between different marketing channels, and online-offline in particular,” said Jon Vein, co-founder and CEO of MarketShare. Read the whole story...

  • 'NYTimes' Redesign Gets Mixed ReviewsThe New York Times

    Since its recent redesign, editors at The New York Times claim to have seen a measurable increase in visits to NYTimes.com, as well as time spent by visitors. The paper of record has also experienced its fair share of reader criticism, according to its public editor, Margaret Sullivan. Among other complaints, some readers say the new font is too small; navigating around the site and printing stories have become a chore; and the cartoons are impossible to find.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • 'Financial Times' Premieres Samsung Smart TV AppTalking Biz News

    The Financial Times is partnering with Samsung Smart TV to make its videos available on the big screen. With the use of the FT app, Smart TV owners can now watch videos covering "issues in politics, business and finance," writes Chris Roush. The app "also broadcasts culture and lifestyle features and a text scroller of the latest FT news headlines." Read the whole story...

  • Spotify Drops Free Listening LimitsThe Register

    Surely music to consumers’ ears, Spotify has scrapped restrictions on free listening. “Previously, the service capped the number of hours you could listen to music without a subscription,” The Register reports. “Industry sources suggest that Spotify's maturing advertising sales operation -- and a different advertising marketplace -- have helped it to increase its advertising rates, and thus pay the royalties required by record companies and music publishers.”
     


    Read the whole story...

  • Netflix To Stream 'Marco Polo' Series Later This YearWall Street Journal

    Netflix picked up exclusive rights to stream the nine-chapter series "Marco Polo," starting in late 2014. The series was originally developed at the Starz channel. Read the whole story...

  • Report: Google Only Serious Bidder For NestRe/code

    While Nest’s $3.2 billion price tag might suggest a bidding war, Google was reportedly the only serious bidder for the smart-home startup. “Sources familiar with details of the acquisition said that Google was the only serious bidder and Apple was not in the mix,” Re/Code reports. Google Ventures, it’s worth noting, was a top backer of Nest.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • Native Ads: Publishers Shortchanging Marketers?Adweek

    "Are publishers doing native on the cheap?" asks Lucia Moses in this post that looks at how publishers and brands are actually working with writers in this suddenly hot arena. "One brand marketer told of an established news organization promising native content produced by its top journalists but that ultimately used marketing freelancers," writes Moses.

    “They represented themselves as giving access to their editorial staff,” an unnamed exec tells Moses. “Then they delivered articles written by copywriters instead of journalists.” Read the whole story...

  • Backlash To 'NYT,' 'Guardian' Stories Underscores Uneasy Bond Between Trad Journalists & Social MediaColumbia Journalism Review

    An outpouring of negative reactions to stories written about Lisa Bonchek Adams, who has been blogging and tweeting about her experiences as a stage IV breast cancer patient, show how difficult it is for traditional journalists to cover social media well. Former New York Times editor Bill Keller and his wife, Emma G. Keller (the former writing in the Times, the latter in The Guardian, which has since deleted the post) touched off a backlash because "neither have actually understood how social media works as a conversation and as a community," writes Zeynep Tufecki in Medium.

    Complicated but fascinating story. Read the whole story...

  • 'Chicago Sun-Times' Tests Bicoin PaywallSan Francisco Chronicle

    Sure to confuse a lot of local readers, the Chicago Sun-Times plans to test a bitcoin-based paywall. And, surprise, surprise, “The set-up is a little complicated,” SFGate.com writes. “As soon as someone goes to Suntimes.com, they will encounter the BitWall paywall,” it reports. “To read articles, users will have to make a donation (via bitcoin) to the Taproot Foundation … The Sun-Times will then use a bitcoin exchange, like Coinbase, to convert it back to USD.”
     


    Read the whole story...

  • Fox Drops Out Of Pilot SeasonBloomberg

    Fox will no longer participate in pilot season, moving instead to "year-round development of television series... in an approach that more closely resembles cable TV’s process," writes Andy Fixmer. The network will still, however, hold its own upfront presentation in May.

    In other news, the company will promote its coverage of the Super Bowl on all its channels. For example, "Nat Geo will run Super Bowl bumpers in primetime all week leading up to the game, while FX has Fox Sports mascot “Cleatus” hosting a robot movie marathon the night of Feb. 1," writes Capital New York's Alex Weprin. Read the whole story...

  • 'NYT' Native Ad Program Sees Role For Ad AgenciesRebecca LIeb

    "We’re mostly working with the brands, but there’s a huge role for the ad agencies and the PR agencies," notes New York Times’ EVP Advertising Meredith Kopit Levien of the paper's just-launched native ad program in this Q&A with Rebecca Lieb. "We’ve tried to organize in a way that’s friendly to an agency buying."

    Another question Levien addresses: whether freelancers writing native content can also write for the editorial sections of the paper.

    Read the whole story...

  • 'Mad Men' Sets ETA For New Season Hitfix

    Add this to your schedule now: "Mad Men" will return on Sunday, April 13 at 10 p.m. The show, which has become an ad industry institution, inspiring the byline of Richard Whitman for MAD MediaPsssst, will split its seventh, final season into two parts, airing seven episodes this year and seven in 2015. Read the whole story...

  • 'Hollywood Reporter' Hires Lindgren As Acting EditorMediabistro

    The Hollywood Reporter has hired Hugo Lindgren as acting editor for three months while editorial director Janice Min takes charge of Billboard. Lindgren was mostly recently editor in chief of the New York Times Magazine. "This is another masthead coup for Min and suggests perhaps that the industry and culture purview of The Hollywood Reporter print side will be venturing even further into Vanity Fair-style territory," writes Richard Hogan. Read the whole story...

  • ICrossing Faces Staff ExodusAdweek

    New York-based digital agency iCrossing has "suffered considerable upheaval among its upper-level creative talent, experiencing an exodus that raises eyebrows even in the revolving-door world of advertising," writes Christopher Heine. The latest exit at the Hearst-owned shop: the head of social, Amanda Peters, who left "for another opportunity," according to Heine. Read the whole story...

  • Dick Clark Productions Enjoys 'Unlikely Comeback'The New York Times

    Dick Clark Productions, a "small, musty company, founded 57 years ago with 'American Bandstand,'" is undergoing an "unlikely comeback," writes Brooks Barnes. Key to the good news: "Networks these days crave event television, and, increasingly, Dick Clark's live, star-studded spectacles are delivering it."  There are 14 shows the company will deliver this year, among them Sunday's Golden Globes and the new People Magazine Awards.

    And speaking of awards shows, Oscar nominations will be announced on Thursday by "Chris Hemsworth, an actor whose films tend to show up at the Academy Awards only in categories like Best Visual Effects," and AMPAS president Cheryl Boone Isaacs, writes The Wrap's Steve Pond. Read the whole story...

  • 'Jewish Daily Forward' Aims To Push Envelope With VideoAmerican Journalism Review

    The Jewish Daily Forward "is pushing the envelope in streaming media," writes Josh Davidsburg. At the now-weekly newspaper, which has gone through many incarnations since it was founded in 1897 as a Yiddish daily, editors are "trying to position ourselves as the home for Jewish video," editor in chief Jane Eisner tells Davidsburg. "Every day we publish two videos on our homepage. Sometimes it’s our original work; other times it’s video that [we think]  is just great."
    Read the whole story...

  • Almost Half Of U.S. TV Viewers Use Second ScreenThe Hollywood Reporter

    Nearly half (44%) of Americans use a second screen while watching TV, according to a just-released study by NATPE and the Consumer Electronics Association that indicates "there are opportunities to increase [second screens’] appeal." For among the second-screen users, "only 13 percent say that it makes the program-viewing experience 'much more enjoyable,'" writes Alex Ben Block. "A significant 67 percent report that it makes their TV viewing 'somewhat more enjoyable.'" Read the whole story...

  • Survey: Fewer Americans Recognize Top TV News AnchorPew Research Center

    Only 27% of participants in a Pew online survey correctly identified Brian Williams as anchor of NBC Nightly News (the top-rated broadcast evening news show) -- a significant comedown from the 47% who could identify Dan Rather, anchor of then-top-rated CBS Evening News in 1985. "The lower public awareness of news anchors reflects a large decline in the audience for nightly network news since the 1980s," writes Rob Suls. Read the whole story...

  • Amazon Signs Deal To Stream CBS' 'Extant'Reuters

    Amazon 's Prime Instant Video program will stream the CBS science-fiction show "Extant" four days after its June debut, according to an exclusive, just-brokered deal. Amazon has a similar deal with PBS for "Downton Abbey." Read the whole story...

  • Time Warner Cable Loses 215,000 Customers In Q4Bloomberg

    Time Warner Cable lost 215,000 TV customers in  Q4 2013, bringing losses for the year to a total of about 825,000, up from 530,000 in 2012. "Charter may unveil a $62 billion bid for Time Warner Cable as soon as this week, people with knowledge of the matter have said," writes Alex Sherman. Read the whole story...

  • NBC Prepares For Stressful, Perhaps Higher-Rated OlympicsCapital New York

    Covering the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, will definitely be stressful for NBC, what with terrorism threats and Russia's anti-gay laws providing ready-made controversy. Still, "in a perverse way, the uncertainty surrounding the games makes for something amounting to 'Must See TV,' as viewers may tune in to see if anything unexpected happens," writes Alex Weprin.

    Weprin reports on a press conference where the network addressed the issues surrounding the "interesting ride" coming up -- as “Today” co-anchor Matt Lauer put it. Read the whole story...

  • Dr. Oz To Be Cover Boy For First Ish Of His MagNew York Post

    Hearst shipped its newest magazine to the printers -- Dr. Oz The Good Life, set for a Feb. 4 newsstand launch -- with the good doctor's image as the cover shot. "By taking the cover himself, the health and fitness guru is following the trail blazed by other eponymous magazines — including those produced by Oprah Winfrey, Martha Stewart and Rachael Ray," writes Keith Kelly. Still, it's unclear whether Dr. Oz will always be the cover image, as at least Winfrey and Ray continue to be. Read the whole story...

  • 'San Fran Chronicle' To Send Reporters To Digital Boot CampMashable

    The San Francisco Chronicle is sending all its reporters to a two-month "digital and social media boot camp," as part of "a radical plan to arrest circulation decline and remain relevant in the digital age," writes Chris Taylor.

    "The approach is novel for newspapers," Audrey Cooper, the pub's managing editor, tells Taylor. "It physically removes reporters from the traditional newsroom and gives them new digital metrics, such as engagement time, to judge whether their stories have reached our core audience." Read the whole story...

  • 'GQ' Mag Barbershop To Open At Barclays CenterAdweek

    GQ magazine is opening its first branded barbershop this Friday at sports and event arena Brooklyn's Barclays Center, in partnership with Fellow Barber. The pub had previously opened GQ-branded bars "in far-flung locations like Istanbul, Moscow and Dubai (next up: Kazakhstan) and even [developed] a GQ-branded car (the Fiat 500c GQ Edition)," writes Emma Bazilian. Read the whole story...

  • What 'NYT' Social Desk Learned About Successful TweetingNieman Journalism Lab

    "Let journalists deliver the news" is just one of the lessons the New York Times' social media desk learned in 2013, writes Michael Roston, social media staff editor at the paper. "We focus on retweeting reporters and editors who are directly involved in covering the news, steering clear of external sources of information whose accuracy we cannot count on."

    Roston also analyzes some of the year's successes and less-than-stellar moments in this piece. Read the whole story...

  • CNBC Questions Analyst Who Blacklisted Apple On Moral GroundsCNBC

    Ronnie Moas, the financial analyst in the spotlight right now for blacklisting Apple and Amazon on moral grounds, appears on CNBC's "Smart Money," and he comes across as high-minded, but nervous and defensive. "It's disgraceful" that nobody's looking into the way employees at such companies are being treated, he says. 

    "I recently read something about Amazon and how much pressure is on their employees … and at the same time Jeff Bezos with his obscene net worth of $27 bln was on his yacht in the Galapagos Islands. $27 bln and this man is not treating his workers fairly? It boggles the mind," he wrote in his report. Read the whole story...

  • IPOs Drove VC Dollars In 2013VentureBeat

    In 2013, venture-backed companies generated $56.5 billion in exits, according to research firm Pitchbook. “A total of 1,814 investors had exits,” notes VentureBeat. Where did all the money come from? “Last year saw 107 IPO exits, which is the most since 2007, the year before the Great Recession … Merger-and-acquisition activity had its slowest year since 2009.” All told, VCs invested $49.9 billion of capital in 6,185 deals.
     

    Read the whole story...

  • How Netflix Organizes EntertainmentThe Atlantic Wire

    Netflix is hardly the only company using tons of meta-data to organize, target and recommend content. Yet, its approach appears to be particularly worthy of investigation. “If Netflix can show such tiny slices of cinema to any given user, and they have 40 million users, how vast did their set of ‘personalized genres’ need to be to describe the entire Hollywood universe?” The Atlantic’s Alexis Madrigal wonders.
     


    Read the whole story...

  • Media Giants Get 60+% Of Profits From Cable Nets The Hollywood Reporter

    Cable networks made sure their parent companies stayed in the black, "contributing more than 60 percent of nearly all entertainment giants' operating profits," due to "ad growth and gains from carriage fee negotiations," writes George Szalai. He cites The Hollywood Reporter's "analysis of data from the first three quarters of 2013." However, "CBS Corp., which has a smaller cable portfolio, is the exception, though its growth outpaced most peers," he writes. Read the whole story...

  • First: 'NYT' Movie Critic's Tweet Used In Ad CampaignThe Wrap

    An ad for “Inside Llewyn Davis” excerpted an edited tweet from New York Times movie critic A.O. Scott, marking probably the first time a critic's Twitter musings had been so used. In response, Scott tweeted: “We have reached a strange new place in marketing when tweets become full-page print ads. 'I think you’d like this movie’ -- A.O. Scott, phone conversation with his mother.”

    However, "CBS Films' use of the partial tweet -- if, as it seems, it came without Scott's full permission, seems to be a straightforward violation of Twitter's rules about the use of tweets in ads," writes Owen Thomas in ReadWrite. Read the whole story...

  • 'Advertising Age' Goes BiweeklyMediabistro

    Advertising Age is cutting its print frequency down to 25 issues a year, though the minimum number of pages for those editions will increase by 50%. "In related news, Ad Age has promoted its editor, Abbey Klaassen, to associate publisher, editorial and audience," writes Chris O'Shea. Read the whole story...

  • Bauer Cuts Rate Base For 'Closer' MagAdweek

    After initial lukewarm sales, Bauer Publishing is cutting its 2014 rate base for Closer, the celeb mag targeted to 40-something women that launched the end of October. The rate base is now 100,000, down from the original circulation promise of 150,000. Read the whole story...

  • 'Two' CBS Comedies Drive FCC ComplaintsAdweek

    CBS comedies "2 Broke Girls" and "Two and a Half Men" racked up impressive numbers of viewer complaints to the Federal Communications Commission in the past few years -- 91 and 98, respectively, "according to documents unearthed by the Government Attic Web site via the Freedom of Information Act," writes Anthony Crupi. Most of the complaints "have to do with viewers’ concerns with sexual innuendo and coarse language," he writes. And "some of the written communiqués filed away by the FCC are (unintentionally) funnier than anything you’ll see or hear on either show." Read the whole story...

  • 'NYT' Finances Reach High PointQuartz

    The New York Times ended the year on a high note: "Shares in the [company] climbed above the $16 mark [on Dec. 30] and look poised to end 2013 at their highest levels in more than five years after rising more than 90% since the start of the year," writes John McDuling. That "might seem curious, [though,] given that advertising revenue at the company fell for the 12th straight quarter in October, to its lowest level since 1998." Read the whole story...

  • Soap Operas Rebound In Q3CNBC

    Daytime soap operas -- a TV genre long left for dead -- have been having a bit of a comeback, with a ratings surge "for the first time in years" in 2013's third quarter, writes Catherine Boyle. "Part of this is due to new story lines and characters targeting the key female 18-49 demographic but the answer may also lie in using social media and the internet," she adds.

    "The number of tweets about TV increased by 38 percent between the second quarter of 2012 and the same time in 2013, according to Nielsen. And for the first time, Nielsen identified a link between a spike in Tweets about a TV show and its ratings." Read the whole story...

  • ABC Blocks Time Warner, Dish Subscribers From Immediate Online AccessFierce Cable.com

    ABC has begun to limit immediate access of new complete episodes of its shows on ABC.com "to customers of pay TV providers that it has signed to TV Everywhere authentication deals," writes Steve Donohue. That means subscribers of major pay TV systems such as Time Warner Cable, Dish and DirecTV will find ABC shows off-limits in the week after their premiere. Read the whole story...

  • AOL Finds Buyer For Winamp, ShoutcastTechCrunch

    Radionomy, a Brussels-based aggregator of online radio stations, has reportedly agreed to buy Winamp and Shoutcast from AOL. “Radionomy has some 6,000 stations in its catalog already, with an emphasis on a do-it-yourself platform that anyone can use to create a channel,” TechCrunch reports. “Shoutcast’s 50,000-strong catalog of radio stations will be a major boost on that front … Winamp’s media playing software could be used to help program those radio stations and offer additional services.”
     

    Read the whole story...

  • NY 'Daily News' Hires Boroughs EditorCapital New York

    The New York Daily News has hired Jotham Sederstrom, formerly of The New York Observer, as editor of its boroughs coverage."The move will no doubt reassure News staffers who had been worried that 'New York’s hometown newspaper' might be pulling back on the comprehensive local coverage that has helped distinguish it from the New York Post over the years," writes Joe Pompeo. Read the whole story...

  • Cable TV Viewing Bounds Ahead Of Broadcast, But Gains UnevenUSA Today

    What cord-cutting? Despite the growth of on-demand video streaming, cable TV also had some impressive gains: "Viewers spent a record 17.2 hours per week watching ad-supported cable networks in 2013, rebounding from a slight dip last year, while the big four networks claimed a combined 7.5 hours, another low," writes Gary Levin. Still, "half of the top cable networks saw prime-time audience declines." Read the whole story...

  • Esquire Network Makes Less-Than-Stellar DebutWomen's Wear Daily

    Ratings are in for the first three months of Esquire Network, the pub's cable TV channel, and the figures are less-than impressive: "Although NBC said Esquire would be available in 75 million homes, the channel has had trouble luring in even a fraction of that audience, amassing an average household viewership of 55,000 during prime time, according to data supplied by Nielsen," writes Alexandra Steigrad. Read the whole story...

  • 'New York' Mag's Restaurant Critic Finally Shows His Face In PrintNew York Magazine

    This week's New York magazine features a cover photo of the pub's food critic, Adam Platt, who abandons "the myth of anonymity" with a thoughtfully written piece that skewers "this dated charade" in a "crowdsourced age, [when] no one’s really anonymous anymore."

    "A couple of months back, the proprietors of the clam shack ZZ’s Clam Bar sent a bouncer over to boot me from their restaurant, presumably in retribution for an unflattering review," Platt writes. "Now that the great anonymity charade is over, maybe the bouncers will recognize me before I walk in the door." Read the whole story...