• ay oodbye o ello
    That's what social media panel moderator Cathy Taylor seemed to imply Tuesday during OMMA Premium Display in New York. Taylor, a contributing editor of MediaPost's who pens the Social Media Insider, was talking about ello, of course -- the new, out-of-the-box social network with the unique positioning of being the "anti ad social network." By that, we mean, ello is premised on being a social network that doesn't carry advertising, and implicitly is a social network for people sick-and-tired of being advertised to on social networks (and maybe other media too). It was the ad industry and social media circles ...
  • Brands and video content - for long term

    Brands always want to create, and be associated with, engaging digital video and other content. But a key question is: How long can you last?

    “How are you going to produce all this content throughout a year?” asks Al Cadena, senior account director and digital strategist for Beeby Clark + Meyler, in speaking at OMMA Premium Display in New York. “That is one of the biggest challenges”. The process can be a long one, and hurdles abound especially when clients have limited budgets and the content has to run in step with strategic business objectives. This also includes ...

  • Garfield & Millard Let Gloves Come Off (Again)
    In this corner (!) we have MediaPost columnist Bob Garfield, and in the other is Wenda Harris Millard, President & COO at Medialink! Yes, one of the main events (!) during this year's Advertising Week is currently going down at OMMA's Premium Display conference, in New York. As with their previous encounters, the industry veterans are trading thinly-veiled barbs on a range of topics, including publishers' wholesale embrace of "native advertising." Garfield calls the increasingly intimate relationship between publishers and brands a truly "Faustian bargain," and the source of his "ongoing heartbreak." Worse yet, publishers of the highest caliber (The ...
  • Mobile Is Sort Of Premium

    Does premium live on mobile? The answer from the OMMA panel seemed to be a half-hearted “yes” with iCrossing’s Christine Bensen memorably noting that once mobile gets past the back pocket challenge of “butt clicks,” then a serious discussion can begin about premium ads on smartphones. Digitas’ Schlachter sidestepped the question by referring to a lot of experimentation happening in mobile, while Cramer-Krasselt’s Lisa Purpura suggested premium could exist on any platform as long as the ad creative is suitable and meets the campaign objective. Similarly, Allegra Kadet of Neo@Ogilvy said that because mobile is the most intimate media ...

  • How do you define 'premium?'

    What is “premium,” anyway? That’s the topic of the morning’s final panel at OMMA Premium Display conference. Not surprisingly, it turns out premium is in the eye of the beholder. While the term is often associated with established, respected publishers, panelists from agencies including iCrossing, Neo@Ogilvy and DigitasLBi suggested some variations on that theme. One idea is that premium is determined not just by a particular set of publishers or content per se, but by the audience it attracts. For that reason, Digitas’ Adam Schlachter considers Buzzfeed to be premium because of the level of engagement it drives, though no ...

  • What Makes A "Premium" Publisher?
    For ad buyers, what constitutes a "premium publisher," today? For Cramer-Krasselt, premium means a top publisher that can "bring [one its brand client's] strategies to life," according to Lisa Purpura, VP and Director of Digital Strategy at the agency. Perhaps even more important that the name of the publisher (and its associated prestige), "It's about the experience," Purpura told attendees of OMMA's Premium Display conference, on Tuesday. Purpura, for example, recently worked closely with MLB.com to create an original experience for Edward Jones Investments. The "Edward Jones Chatty Cage" show, so-called, gives lucky fans "face-to-face" interactions various major leaguers.
  • Why Did Audi Pick Ricky Gervais To Drive Interest In A3?
    If you were wondering why Audi enlisted Ricky Gervais to promote it new A3 sedan, then, well, you're in good company. Benny Lawrence, Manager of Media and Brand Innovation at Audi of America, herself isn't "privy to the exact reasons why" the luxury car brand chose the controversial comedian to launch the budget (by Audi's standards) vehicle. Still, Lawrence suggested that Gervais had the "right tone and spirit to bring the campaign to life." Also, "he has a point of view," and "brought some excitement to the launch." The A3 campaign, which also featured U.S. boxing champ Claressa Shields and ...
  • PepsiCo's Farfan: Building Community Doesn't Require Deep Pockets

    Speaking at the OMMA Premium Display conference, Javier Farfan, Head of Music, Entertainment, and Culture Marketing, at PepsiCo, suggested a brand doesn’t necessarily require the vast resources of the beverage giant to build their presence online. He said the process goes back to the fundamentals of storytelling, creativity and creating a community through social media and other tools. Creating a community depends on having a specific point of view carried out through messaging. “That’s how you create a brand,” said Farfan. Keep in mind that Coca-Cola's presence on Facebook was initially started by a pair of devoted fans and has ...

  • Why Every Ad Can't Be Data-Driven
    Data driven ad campaigns are great, but not always practical, according to panelists at the OMMA Premium Display conference, on Tuesday. For one, some industries lend themselves to data availability more than others, said Monik Sanghvi, Chief Strategy Officer at Organic. Another issue is "cultural," Sanghvi said, referring to brand clients that just aren't prone to taking "big bets," or relying too heavily on newer engagement models.
  • The Good, The Bad & The Ugly Of "Social Service"
    As a customer service channel, transparency is the best and worse part about social media channels. The good, the bad, and the ugly is there for all to see -- at least until a brand blocks some egregious consumer behavior -- on Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms. So said panelists at MediaPost's Social Media Insider Summit, on Friday. When the comments and questions are good, Facebook works in a brand's favor, because that feed typically moves much slower than its Twitter feed. On Twitter, meanwhile, Ashley McGregor Dey, Social Media Manager at Indiegogo, said it was hard to see success ...
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