• Boomers Control $14 Trillion, Essential To Growing A Business
    Baby boomers are the only demographic that has gotten wealthier over the last 10 years, while Gen Xers and Millennials have seen their net worth decline or in some cases disappear, often buried under a pile of student loans. Marketers devote a lot of energy to Gen X and Millennials, but baby boomers and senior citizens represent an untapped opportunity. Recent census data indicates that people aged 55+ represent 26% of the U.S. population and a whopping 66% of the country's net worth, or $14 trillion.
  • Marketers Have A Sex Problem
    "Marketers have a sex problem," wrote Geoffrey Rowan in a recent article, "Sex in Advertising Sells: So why NOT to the Over 50s?," on FabOverFifty.com. "They slather it liberally onto any brand surface where it might stick - the ultimate consumption aphrodisiac. No one gets fired from a marketing job for saying sex sells. But at the same time, they ignore or alienate the source of half of all U.S. household spending because sexy older people ... well - that's ridiculous. "The failing of marketers is that we tend to prematurely sexualize young people, and prematurely desexualize older people," says ...
  • What Tiny Trend Is Big With Boomers?
    Tiny living, downsizing, right sizing, small living, micro living. Whatever you call it, this huge trend is all about paring down living spaces and simplifying everyday life.
  • Boomers And Healthcare
    Boomers are concerned about their health and rightly so. Of the 75+ million Americans who make up the boomer generation, about 3 million are hitting retirement age every year for the next 20 - and they are focusing on their future. With that in mind, marketers of everything from exercise to food to pharmaceuticals can and should be speaking to the boomer crowd.
  • Entrepreneurial Boomers On The Rise
    There has never been a better time for Boomers to start a business. Opportunities abound in consulting; retail, business services and with a franchise model. Boomers have the experience, contacts and maturity to start a business and launch a second career. They likely have more flexibility now that children are grown and expenses have changed. In addition, people are living longer and being healthier longer so a change away from traditional employment may be beneficial.
  • The Average Baby Boomer Market Doesn't Exist
    The purpose of marketing and sales communications is to stimulate awareness, interest and desire in customer minds that lead to decisions to buy. An implicit presumption in marketing is that customer minds at least adult customer' minds process information more or less the same way. Therefore, marketers stereotypically direct communication to the "average customer."
  • How To Market To The Affluent While Respecting Their Privacy
    Advertisers looking to reach affluent consumers typically have several options, but they've always struggled with the limitations of those options. They could buy print advertising in publications claiming to have affluent readership, such as Vogue, The New York Times, or Cond Nast Traveler. They could make TV buys during large events, such as the Super Bowl, hoping that the scale of those events brought a good percentage of affluent viewers. Direct mail presented a slightly more precise tactic, letting marketers send offers to homes in affluent ZIP codes, or to the subscribers of the previously-named publications.
  • Who Are The Boomers, Really?
    Who are the Boomers? Depending on your source of information, the Boomer generation is confident, insecure, lonely, sociable, responsible, unprepared, couch-bound, active, powerful, adventurous, happy and pessimistic.
  • How To Market To The Affluent While Respecting Their Privacy
    Advertisers looking to reach affluent consumers typically have several options, but they've always struggled with the limitations of those options. They could buy print advertising in publications claiming to have affluent readership, such as Vogue, The New York Times, or Cond Nast Traveler. They could make TV buys during large events, such as the Super Bowl, hoping that the scale of those events brought a good percentage of affluent viewers. Direct mail presented a slightly more precise tactic, letting marketers send offers to homes in affluent ZIP codes, or to the subscribers of the previously-named publications.
  • Why Is It So Hard To Make Jeans That Boomers Can Love?
    We've been listening to women 45+ for seven years now, and there is one question that never goes away: Where can I find a pair of jeans to love? The failure of the marketplace to answer this question for so many women remains particularly confusing, because the opportunity is so great, and the need is so clear. We recently surveyed these women for some updated insights. If you want to capture a bigger piece of this giant market, here is your business plan.
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