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Jose Villa

Member since July 2007Contact Jose

I am the founder and President of Sensis, a cross-cultural marketing agency driving behavior change. Jose founded Sensis as a Web development firm in 1998, and one of the first agencies focused on the multicultural digital market. He has since grown Sensis into a full service advertising agency combining Hispanic, African-American, and Asian capabilities in one agency. Jose has more than 19 years of experience in advertising, digital communications and multicultural marketing across a variety of industries, including healthcare, financial services, higher education, CPG, beverage, pay TV, telecommunications, government and non-profits. He has pioneered a new “cross-cultural” approach to reaching the diverse American mainstream and been on the forefront of the debate regarding the “total market approach.”

Articles by Jose All articles by Jose

  • Millennials And Gen Z Are The Hispanic Market in Engage:Hispanics on 11/25/2016

    There is a big reason why marketers have spent the last five years obsessed with Millennials - the numbers. Millennials total 75.4 million and have overtaken Baby Boomers as America's largest generation. The business community is also starting to pay attention to the next generation, Gen Z. This group of people under the age of 20 is already almost as large as Millennials. Millennials and Gen Z combine to make up more than 50% of the entire U.S. population. The future is now.

  • Brands Are Not Yet Embracing Their Cross-cultural Future in Engage:Hispanics on 10/27/2016

    This month, I had the opportunity to attend the Association of National Advertisers' Multicultural Conference and participate in the launch of the "We Are Gen Z Report." It was an interesting intersection of where cultural marketing is today and where I think it's going in the future.

  • The Social And Mobile World Of Hispanic Millennials in Engage:Millennials on 09/30/2016

    Hispanic Millennials have come of age with technology and social media. Not surprisingly, they have become very adept at using technology in their daily lives and staying connected to the world around them. The most recent wave of the Hispanic Millennial Project provides an in-depth view into the social media and mobile lives of Hispanic Millennials. While they are heavy users of technology, they still show significant differences in social and mobile behavior with big implications for marketers trying to engage with them.

  • Effective Hispanic Advertising That Drives Behavior Change in Engage:Hispanics on 09/23/2016

    Most marketers view their role as driving demand, either via upper funnel branding and awareness activities or lower funnel direct response, sales and retention activities. Advertising is generally viewed as one of the primary tools to drive consumer demand. But what is at the core of driving consumer demand? Changing consumer behavior. That behavior change could involve new product trial, increasing occasion, acquiring market share by driving preference change, or increasing retention. To quote Adam Ferrier from his influential book The Advertising Effect, "Advertising is really the business of behavior change."

  • The Obsolete Hispanic Ad Agency in Engage:Hispanics on 08/25/2016

    A MediaPost op-ed by Luciana Gomez ignited a conversation within the Hispanic marketing industry regarding the relevance of Hispanic ad agencies. Gomez's piece opined that Hispanic agencies are experiencing stunted growth for a number of reasons. They are underpaying talent, have low client budgets, they need to work within pre-existing "general market" campaign structures, have an over-emphasis on Spanish TV, and stale insights. These agencies only have control of three of these issues.

  • Content [Marketing] Is King In Reaching Hispanic Millennials in Engage:Hispanics on 07/28/2016

    You know Hispanic Millennials - Hispanics aged approximately 21 - 37 - are a critical, coveted segment of the U.S. Hispanic market. They are comprised of the two most historically attractive consumer segments of 18-24 and 25-34 year olds. They represent more than 27% of the entire Hispanic population and are growing, mainly due to immigration. Compare that to Gen X and Baby Boomer Hispanics, who represent a combined 33% of the U.S. Hispanic population but are shrinking as they age. If you're focused on the Hispanic market in 2016, you are essentially focused on Hispanic Millennials.

  • Cross-cultural Gen Z in Engage:Hispanics on 06/23/2016

    Move over Millennials, here comes Gen Z. Who are they? Definitions vary but most demographers define Gen Z - also referred to as Centennials, iGen, or Plurals - as consumers born between 1995 and 2010.

  • The Social And Mobile World Of Hispanic Millennials in Engage:Hispanics on 05/26/2016

    Hispanic Millennials have come of age with technology and social media. Not surprisingly, they have become very adept at using technology in their daily lives and staying connected to the world around them. The most recent wave of the Hispanic Millennial Project provides an in-depth view into the social media and mobile lives of Hispanic Millennials. While they are heavy users of technology, they still show significant differences in social and mobile behavior with big implications for marketers trying to engage with them.

  • Defining Cross-culturalism in Engage:Hispanics on 04/28/2016

    I've discussed how Corporate America is "moving multicultural out of the silos." Marketplace dynamics are clumsily driving this shift in the form of the total market approach, as brands look to stay relevant and grow in the increasingly minority-majority reality of Millennial and Gen Z populations. There is another factor underpinning the change in multicultural strategies by major marketers: an understanding that culture no longer exists in silos according to ethnicity.

  • It's Dangerous To Ignore The Impact Of Hispanic Millennials in Engage:Hispanics on 03/24/2016

    The "millennial experts" of today have replaced the "social media experts" of the previous decade. This new cottage industry is driven by demand from large organizations and brands that are still trying to figure out how to make the millennial market work for them.

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