The Rain In Spain

Olá! Greetings from the soggy Iberian Peninsula.  I’ve been in Spain and Portugal for the last three weeks, which has included -- count them -- 21 days of rain and gale-force winds. Weather aside, it’s been amazing. I have spent very little of that time thinking about online media.

But, for what they’re worth, here are some random observations from the last three weeks:

The Importance of Familiarity

While here, I’ve been reading Derek Thompson’s book " Hitmakers". One of the critical components of a hit is a foundation of familiarity. Once this is in place, a hit provides just enough novelty to tantalize us. It’s why Hollywood studios seem stuck on the superhero sequel cycle.



This was driven home to me as I traveled. I’m a do-it-yourself traveler. I avoid packaged vacations whenever and wherever possible. But there is a price to be paid for this. Every time we buy groceries, take a drive, catch a train, fill up with gas or drive through a tollbooth (especially in Portugal) there is a never-ending series of puzzles to be solved.

The fact that I know no Portuguese and very little Spanish makes this even more challenging. I’m always up for a good challenge, but I have to tell you, at the end of three weeks, I’m mentally exhausted. I’ve had more than enough novelty, and I’m craving more familiarity.

This has made me rethink the entire concept of familiarity.  Our grooves make us comfortable. They’re the foundations that make us secure enough to explore. It’s no coincidence that the words “family” and “familiar” come from the same etymological root. 

The Opposite of Agile Development

While in Seville, we visited the cathedral. The main altarpiece, which is the largest and one of the finest in the world, was the life’s work of one man, Pierre Dancart. He worked on it for 44 years of his life and never saw the finished product. In total, it took over 80 years to complete.

Think about that for a moment. This man worked on this one piece of art for his entire life. There was no morning where he woke up and wondered, “Hmm, what am I going to do today?” This was it, from the time he was barely more than a teenager until he was an old man. And he still never got to see the completed work. That span of time is amazing to me. If built and finished today, it would have been started in 1936.

The Ubiquitous Screen

I love my smartphone. It has saved my ass more than once on this trip. But I was saddened to see that our preoccupation with being connected has spread into every nook and cranny of European culture. Last night, we went for dinner at a lovely little tapas bar in Lisbon. It was achingly romantic. There was a young German couple next to us who may or may not have been in love. It was difficult to tell, because they spent most of the evening staring at their phones rather than at each other.

I have realized that the word “screen” has many meanings, one of which is a “barrier meant to hide things or divide us.”

El Gordo

Finally, after giving my name in a few places and getting mysterious grins in return, I have realized that “gordo” means “fat” in Spanish and Portuguese.

Make of that what you will.

1 comment about "The Rain In Spain".
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  1. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited, March 13, 2018 at 1:50 p.m.

    Very proud of you. I spent a month in Analusia and Valencia driving and touring through Spain on my own. GPS in the car (WIFI only ipad) and for sure paper maps which are the only way to get perspective of time and space giving you a visual (visuals) of the entire area (areas) and when the GPS goes a bit haywire. I even had a motocycle officer enscort me back to the main highway when I ask for directions. Mi Espanol es muy mal, tambien. Hope you are having the most wonderful time !

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