1. Charles Pierce from Private
    39 minutes ago re: Facebook Oversight Board To Review Decisions About 'Hate Speech,' 'Dangerous' People by by Wendy Davis (Digital News Daily - Dec. 01)

    Facebook is not a "publisher" in the true sense of the word.

    It creates a platform whose primary purpose it that people or groups can create and share their messages. The phone companies are not responsible for conversations you and I create and share using their technology.

    Facebook does have some editorial or publisher-like content in that it has chosen certain content to post from some news organizations. And, it also accepts and displays advertising to its viewers. So, you could say when it publishes content it pays for or shows ads, then that part of its actions could be subject to traditional legal frameworks.

    The most important point thought is what should Facebook do about people who create and share their own content? Legally, private corporations can run their platforms independent of first amendment considerations so they can choose their form of censorship on this platform. I doubt phone companies could monitor our conversations and censor them though as they depend on common carrier access and are regulated by the government, so censorship by those companies could be subject to the constitution since the government regulates them.

    Ultimately, if people want to lie or promote falsehoods with their own content, and if other people blithely believe everything they hear is true, then it is the people and not the medium that bear the most responsibility.

  2. Daniel Cohen from Cohen Media
    2 hours ago re: The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Year Is Almost Over by by Cory Treffiletti, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Dec. 02)

    Well said Paula!  If all you go by is the stock market you would think 2020 was a great year!

  3. Tony Jarvis from Olympic Media Consultancy
    5 hours ago re: Mediaocean Launches Cross-Media Reach & Frequency Tool, De-Dupes Audiences by by Wayne Friedman (Television News Daily - Dec. 02)

    Fundamental for advertisers and their media agencies is, what de-duplicated "audience reach" definiton are we talking about?  Merely distributed and served to a screen, page or speakers?  Served and fully rendered on a screen or via a page or speakers?  Served, fully rendered with a target audience in proximity to the media vehicle and with a general OTS or OTH the media vehicle?  Served, fuly rendered, with a target audience "viewing" or "hearing" the specific content or ad of particular concern?  Each measure being very different and with vary different value to any user as explained by the ARF Media Model.  Mixing any of these different levels of measurement with their very different values across media platforms would render (no pun intended!) any de-pulicated estimate as specious.  So, yes, can we see the full detailed Techncial Appendix (remember those?) on exacly what MediaOcean is doing please?  Perhaps they would even request a full and detailed appraisal of its validity from the three of us? 

  4. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    6 hours ago re: Mediaocean Launches Cross-Media Reach & Frequency Tool, De-Dupes Audiences by by Wayne Friedman (Television News Daily - Dec. 02)

    John, you may well be right---but, perhaps, we will get a clarification on this. In our annual, "Cross Platform Dimensions 2021", we provide a set of formulas that allow for reasonable reach estimating for schedules in many combinations of media, and there is growing evidence that such calculations probably yield a fairly close approximation of the audience duplication levels for media mix combos. What they do not do is allow the brand to actually track ad awareness or sales results traced to specific consumers reached by one medium or another as well as those covered by various combinations of media as that would require real survey data and, as far as I know, such information is generally not available across all of the major media buying alternatives. So, from a media planning standpoint, estimating the reach of various platforms when used in combination is not the great problem some think it is---it's a fairly simple matter. The hard part is figuring out what actually happens when each reach/frequency segment is exposed and how to adjust the buys to maximize results.

  5. Tony Jarvis from Olympic Media Consultancy
    6 hours ago re: Facebook Oversight Board To Review Decisions About 'Hate Speech,' 'Dangerous' People by by Wendy Davis (Digital News Daily - Dec. 01)

    As eloquently posited by Charlie Warzel in the NY Times, "Facebook is Too Big for Democracy". https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/03/opinion/facebook-zuckerberg-2020-election.html?searchResultPosition=10
    Facebook Oversight Board's, whether "Real" or so called "independent" and merely window dressing, will not stop the, "most powerful unelected man in America" per Mr. Warzel.  I suggest, the new Genghis Khan.  Either Fakebook must be made responsible for everything it publishes to the same established levals of moral, ethical and legal decency standards, or higher, as other major media or it should be closed down. 
    Many have asked, who put the "mock" in democracy in the US?  The leading candidtae is crystal clear.  As the journalist Max Read stated in 2017, "Facebook has grown too big, and its users too complacent, for democracy". 
    When are you going to help save democracy and unsubscribe?

  6. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    8 hours ago re: The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Year Is Almost Over by by Cory Treffiletti, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Dec. 02)

    20 million people will be evicted shortly, more lost jobs, about 25% of the population are food insecure, small businesses are disappearing at a staggering rate, over 265,000 people are dead, our medical professionals are so strung out they are striking, dying getting sick and we are in serious trouble not having enough staff to help someone who need attention for dire problems with hospitals closing at an alarming rate, hate crimes are at a long time high, we are failing in the world. It doesn't mean we stop trying to improve, but the economy has not weathered the storm unless you are the top percentage which is proving that capitalism is falling.

  7. John Grono from GAP Research
    8 hours ago re: Mediaocean Launches Cross-Media Reach & Frequency Tool, De-Dupes Audiences by by Wayne Friedman (Television News Daily - Dec. 02)

    De-duplicated measurement of audiences across media platforms is WAY harder than measuring each individual platform.   The permutations are virtually endless.

    So, I suspect that this is a model using de-duplication factors rather than measuring actual de-duplication.   In fact, I believe that for the foreseeable future 'whole of media' de-duplication simply has to be a model.

    Can Mediaocean please clarify their method?

  8. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    8 hours ago re: The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Year Is Almost Over by by Cory Treffiletti, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Dec. 02)

    ..

  9. Ronald Kurtz from American Affluence Research Center
    10 hours ago re: The New Definition Of Experiential Marketing by by Bryan Blackmon (Marketing Insider - Nov. 25)

    It is hard to imagine that retailers ever failed to recognize that great customer service has always been their primary opportunity to capture and retain customers. All the "experience"
    focus (which often seemed to be like features of entertainment or diversion) was a distraction from the key factors such as attractive inventory well organized and presented, staff in adequate numbers and with product knowledge that could be truly helpful to the consumer, and pricing that offered good value to the target audience. 

  10. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    Yesterday, 10:44 AM re: It's Time For Major Sports Leagues, Platforms To Seek New Audiences by by Wayne Friedman, Staff Writer (TV Watch - Dec. 02)

    In support of Dan's point, if you track the median age of TV sports viewers, they have been steadily rising---as shown in our upcoming edition of "TV Dimensions 2021"----just as the network's primetime audiences have been aging. But if the leagues grant more quality product---not games nobody watches---to digital platforms will they dilute their still significant  "linear TV"  content distribution base, thereby compromising their  revenues? Also, many advertisers buy into TV sports "sponsorships" not so much because of audience size  or demos but for other reasons---like establishing their brand as the NFL brand, or creating an image and enhancing tie-ins with sports personalities they pay big bucks to to promote their products. And what about taking the sales force, or key clients and other "influentials" to the games your brand is sponsoring? Can you do the same thing if the games are seen on a smartphone or desktop PC?

  11. Dan Ciccone from STACKED Entertainment
    Yesterday, 10:25 AM re: It's Time For Major Sports Leagues, Platforms To Seek New Audiences by by Wayne Friedman, Staff Writer (TV Watch - Dec. 02)

    As long as major sports franchises continue to cut deals with linear partners and limit streaming/digital access, they will continue to lose audience.  The model has been broken for years.  The leagues are chasing quick media deal $$$ with major networks vs. modifying their deals to incorporate digital access.

    Doesn't make any sense that as more young people cut the cord (which they have been for the past 10 years) that the major sports leagues keep cutting deals with cable networks and broadcast TV whee the audience is shrinking.

  12. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc
    Yesterday, 10:24 AM re: It's Time For Major Sports Leagues, Platforms To Seek New Audiences by by Wayne Friedman, Staff Writer (TV Watch - Dec. 02)

    An interesting subject, Wayne. One of the main problems faced by  MLB and the NBA, but  not so much by the NFL, is their need to feature extended regular season game schedules in order to amortize the huge rights fees, pay off the leagues and help sponsors to acculumate eyeball "impressions" as a counter to ever rising CPMs. Fact is that many of the regular season games are not only meaningless---as far too many teams now make the post season playoffs---but the athletes  are often not giving their best. So why should such games attract new types of viewers---especially younger, better educated viewers who don't have that much time to devote to unimportant game telecasts?

    There are other issues---such as the politicizing of the games, which offends certain segments of the fan base---and the ways that the players---some of them, at least, behave---such as a guy scoring a touchdown when his team is trailing by 35 points and dancing a "hurrah for wonderful me" jig in the end zone. Is that going to appeal to new viewers?

    Another problem is the slow pace of the games---too many fouls called in basketball and no defense; long, tedious, baseball games with instant replays slowing the action down to a crawl. Is this the kind of product that can be sold to a new ---demographic or mindset type of fan? I tend to doubt that.

  13. Jamie Baker-prewitt from burke
    Yesterday, 10:17 PM re: Identifying COVID Consumer Segments: Q&A With Burke's Jamie Baker-Prewitt by by Charlene Weisler, Op-Ed Contributor (Marketing Daily - Nov. 30)

    Thank you for your comments, Lilian. Our COVID-19 consumer segmentation is at the respondent level, not at the household or family unit level. When we describe segments as being family oriented, we mean consumers who tend to have children in the household. We would love to replicate this segmentation in Latin America! Based on client feedback, core elements of this segmentation resonate with the culture and consumption patterns of in the region, yet some differences surely exist. Appreciate your interest - Jamie

  14. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    Yesterday, 8:29 PM re: Have More People Become More Awful? by by Gord Hotchkiss, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Dec. 01)

    As Hawkeye Pierce replied when he was making some waves to protect someone and his buddy asked if he was trying to change the world, "Just trying to improve his little piece of the world." So when you ask can we each doing something about the selfishness of the people (note: rationing of gasoline, food, metals, etc. during WW II wasn't voluntary), we can all doing our little part. Of course, we have to do some regulating of anti social media and teach journalism/reporting but those can be saved for another day.

  15. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited
    Yesterday, 8:20 PM re: Have More People Become More Awful? by by Gord Hotchkiss, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Dec. 01)

    ..

  16. John Greco from Marketing IMPACT Councilâ„¢
    Yesterday, 2:42 PM re: Let's Throw The Idea Of Brand Life Cycle Out The Window by by Leslie Zane (Marketing Insider - July 19)

    The insights in this article overturn 50 years of traditional marketing thinking/teaching and encourage legacy brands to have more aspirational growth goals. It also reinforces why it is important for leaders at all levels and in all functions of an organization to remain objective, data-driven, and continuously challenge/validate prior assumptions as they develop and execute their brand's overall strategy, no matter how long that brand has been in existence. This all resonates with one of the questions that we help answer in the Marketing IMPACT Council™, i.e., "If you had one more dollar to invest, how would you do so to create the greatest long-term, sustainable positive impact on your brand?" 

  17. LILIAN PAGAN from ASISA RESEARCH GROUP
    Yesterday, 2:19 PM re: Identifying COVID Consumer Segments: Q&A With Burke's Jamie Baker-Prewitt by by Charlene Weisler, Op-Ed Contributor (Marketing Daily - Nov. 30)

    I see that you have identified individual segments as well as family segments.  Is there any correlation between the families types  and  the individual segments?

    Would love to replicate this study in the Latin America.  

  18. Sarah Fay from Glasswing Ventures
    Yesterday, 2:12 PM re: Media 'Planning'? Really? by by Dave Edelman (Marketing Daily - Dec. 01)

    One hundred percent, David.  The use of AI to synthesize data inputs and make media financial decisions in real time takes the guesswork out, eliminates days and weeks of manual work, and frees the "Media Portfolio Manager" to focus on the strategy and plan activation.  To Dan's point, there is a mismatch of time spent directing the budget vs. ensuring that the right creative meshes with the media choices and builds on the brand strategy. Smart teams will automate to solve for complexity and apply creativity so their media + creative = high impact.

  19. David Scardino from TV & Film Content Development
    Yesterday, 1:53 PM re: FCC Chairman Pai To Exit In January by by Wendy Davis (Digital News Daily - Nov. 30)

    I would hope so, but to some extent it would depend on first, if the Dems can win both Georgia seats, and then, assuming they don't, the person of the designee. If he or she is relatively moderate, then they would probably get through; if a radical lefty, then probably not. 

  20. Kenneth Fadner from MediaPost
    Yesterday, 1:50 PM re: Happiness, Shoes, And Tony Hsieh by by Steven Rosenbaum, Featured Contributor (Media Insider - Nov. 30)

    Nice remembrance Steve. Thanks.

  21. Wendy Davis from mediapost
    Yesterday, 1:11 PM re: FCC Chairman Pai To Exit In January by by Wendy Davis (Digital News Daily - Nov. 30)

    Are you confident the Senate will approve Biden's FCC pick?

  22. David Scardino from TV & Film Content Development
    Yesterday, 12:58 PM re: FCC Chairman Pai To Exit In January by by Wendy Davis (Digital News Daily - Nov. 30)

    I don't understand Greer's comment as Pai resigning on Inauguration Day will allow Biden to pick his replacement and have a one seat majority on the FCC. Waiting until the inauguration, seems to me a huge middle finger from Pai to Trump. Maybe I'm missing something...?

  23. Dan Ciccone from STACKED Entertainment
    Yesterday, 12:05 PM re: Media 'Planning'? Really? by by Dave Edelman (Marketing Daily - Dec. 01)

    Very insightful commentary.  Unfortantely, most of these articles focus on metrics and algorithms and software and all-too-often, creative is absent from the conversation or the execution.

    Creative execution should be given much more attention than it is (and by creative, I mean the actual creative assets/messaging/imagery - not getting creative with the planning or buying).  More times than not, the planning team does not know what the creative looks like while in the process of planning or buying.  That's basically asking someone to plan a car trip through the desert, but they don't know if they'll have a Jeep or a Bronco or a Leaf to make the trip until they actually show up at the desert.

    It's difiuclt to execute a plan when you don't know what you're driving.