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Gordon Hotchkiss

Member since August 2004Contact Gordon

Meet Gordon at MediaPost Events

  • Gordon attended OMMA Global at Advertising Week, September 27, 2010

Articles by Gordon All articles by Gordon

  • Why I Go To A Store in Media Insider on 11/21/2017

    I hate shopping. Let me clarify: I hate the physical experience of shopping. I find no joy in a mall. I avoid department stores like the plague. If I can buy it online, I will. Except I don't always click to shop. Why? I should be the gold standard of e-commerce targets. And most of the time, I am. Except when I'm not. Take home improvement stuff, for instance. I still drive down to my local Home Depot, even though I can order online.

  • Attention: Divided in Media Insider on 11/14/2017

    I'd like you to give me your undivided attention. I'd like you to -- but you can't. First, I'm probably not interesting enough. Secondly, you no longer live in a world where that's possible. And third, even if you could, I'm not sure I could handle it. I'm out of practice.

  • Will We Ever Let Robots Shop For Us? in Media Insider on 11/07/2017

    If there were any area where machines can beat humans, it would be in making purchases. They're much better at filtering based on objective criteria, they can stay on top of all prices everywhere and they can instantly aggregate data from all similar types of purchases. Most importantly, machines can't be tricked by branding or marketing.

  • Bias: Bug Or Feature? in Media Insider on 10/31/2017

    When I talk about artificial intelligence, I think of a real-time Venn diagram in motion. One side is the sphere of all human activity. This circle is huge. The other side is the sphere of artificial intelligent activity. It's growing exponentially. And the overlap area between the two is also expanding at the same rate. It's this intersection between the two spheres that fascinates me. What are the rules that govern interplay between humans and machines?

  • When Technology Makes Us Better People in Media Insider on 10/24/2017

    Technology, we collectively owe you one. Why? Because without you, we wouldn't be slowly chipping away at the massive issue of sexual predation. #Metoo couldn't have happened without you.

  • We Don't Need More Athletes Or Models -- We Do Need People Who Understand Complexity in Media Insider on 10/17/2017

    Have you seen the Verizon ad? The one that starts with LeBron James walking toward the camera and then saying "We don't need more LeBrons"? He's followed in quick succession by other celebrities, including model Adriana Lima, quarterback Drew Brees and soccer star David Villa, all saying we don't need more of their kind. The ad wraps up by saying what we do need is more people in science and technology to fill the 4 million jobs available. Fair enough. The world runs on science and technology. But there's an unintended consequence that comes with that. Technology is making the world a more complex place. And what we really need is more people who understand what complexity means.

  • 157 Shades Of Grey in Media Insider on 10/10/2017

    Design is important. Thinking through how people will respond to the aesthetics of your product is an admirable thing. I remember once having the pleasure of sharing a stage with JetBlue's vice president of marketing, Amy Curtis-McIntyre. She explained how important good design was to the airline's overall marketing strategy. A tremendous amount of thought went into the aesthetics of all its printed materials -- even those cards explaining the airplane's safety features that none of us ever read. But on JetBlue, not only did passengers read the cards; they stole them because the cards were so cleverly designed. Was this a problem for management? Not according to Curtis-McIntyre: "You know you're doing something right when people steal your marketing shit," she said.

  • Trust No One, Trust Nothing  in Media Insider on 10/03/2017

    In just one day last week, the headlines of two different MediaPost articles mentioned a lack of trust -- in both contextual ad placement and in audience measurement data. But our industry's trust issues go far deeper than just those two instances. Article after article cites an erosion of trust and the spreading of relational fault lines in every aspect of the ad business.The question of the day is "Where did the trust go?" The follow-up question then becomes "what do we mean by trust?"

  • Together We Lie  in Media Insider on 09/26/2017

    Humans are social animals. We've become this way because, evolutionarily speaking, we do better as a group than individually. But there's a caveat here. If you get a group of usually honest people together, they're more likely to lie. Why is this?

  • I, Robot.... in Media Insider on 09/19/2017

    In the year 1942, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov introduced the Three Rules of Robotics in his collection of short stories, "I, Robot." Asimov set the rules coming from the Handbook of Robotics, 56th Edition, 2058 A.D. What was once an unimaginably distant time in the future is now knocking with increasing intensity on the door of the present. And Elon Musk, for one, is worried, noting, "AI is a fundamental risk to the existence of human civilization" Musk believes, Rules of Robotics or no, we won't be able to control this genie once it gets out of its bottle.

Comments by Gordon All comments by Gordon

  • Too Many Fish In The Sea: The Search For Brand Love by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 02/21/2017)

    Thanks Esther. Ordered and in my Kindle "to read" queue. Stay tuned!

  • The Vanishing Value Of The Truth by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 01/24/2017)

    I should have let Clint write the column..as he has much more expertise in Alternate Facts than I do. Your link is taken from an angle to show a full crowd. A much more objective analysis is here:http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2017/01/24/fact-check-inauguration-crowd-size/96984496/. But at the end of the day..I'm probably not going to change what you believe based on verifiable facts..and that was the whole point of the column.

  • When Evolution (And Democracy) Get It Wrong by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 11/01/2016)

    Paula and John - very interesting thread you've started. I think I'll follow up on this in next week's column.

  • The Rise Of The Audience Marketplace by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 08/30/2016)

    Thanks all for your comments. I actually just submitted tomorrow's column before the recent round of comments. There's a lot of potential follow up here..especially Esther and Doc's contributions. I'll be ruminating further on this.

  • Media Buying Just Tip Of Advertising's Disruptive Iceberg by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 08/09/2016)

    Thanks Ed and Maarten...great points. Regarding the "Hub" concept, I probably didn't add enough of my own thoughts on this topic, as it wasn't the main point of my column. Rather than a hub, I would place my bets on an aggregated media marketplace that is more democratized than our current models. I think audience identification and customization based on multiple (and smarter) segmentation criteria will move media buying to "audience" acquisition. These thoughts are admittedly off the top of my head. Perhaps I'll fully bake them in a future column. Regarding Maarten's comments on filtering - we essentially agree. I meant "objectivity" and "reliability" in terms of what the consumer perceives those things to be. There are all kinds of biases and personal preferences still in place, but I do contend that we are looking for information sources that we perceive as objective and reliable.

  • Trump's Bump: The Scary Appeal Of The Authoritarian Father by Barbara Lippert (Mad Blog on 07/28/2016)

    Barbara..in reading this, I was reminded of something I had read in the past. It took me a bit to dig it up..but found it: "From the standpoint of social development, the family cannot be considered the basis of the authoritarian state, only as one of the most important institutions which support it." Another quote, "(the goal is) producing an individual who is adjusted to the authoritarian order and who will submit to it in spite of all misery and degradation. At first the child has to submit to the structure of the authoritarian miniature state, the family; this makes it capable of later subordination to the general authoritarian system." It was from Wilhelm Reich. The work was the Mass Pscyhology of Fascism. It was written in 1933.

  • Why Marketers Love Malcolm Gladwell -- & Why They Shouldn't by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 05/24/2016)

    A few additional comments..First..Kenneth - you're absolutely right. Mea culpa. Now..to Ted. Absolutely word of mouth and influencers is a huge factor  - my point - and Duncan Watt's point - is it's not nearly as simply or predictable as Gladwell makes it out to be. Anyone could be an influencer, given the right context. You cite a Fast Company article defending influencer marketing - here's one on the opposite side worth a read: http://www.fastcompany.com/641124/tipping-point-toast. Watts discredited? Not really by any credible academic source - just a lot of marketers pissed off because he's poking holes in their business model. And he's certainly got a lot more empirical evidence behind him than Mr. Gladwell.

  • Why Marketers Love Malcolm Gladwell -- & Why They Shouldn't by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 05/24/2016)

    Jeanne - Watts is a very able writer. His prose is accessible - but he is an academic at heart and so doesn't have a habit of jumping to satisfying conclusions, unlike Gladwell. Watts tells things as they appear to be, backed up with empirical evidence, rather than as we wish them to be.

  • The Collateral Damage Of Disruption by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 03/01/2016)

    Thanks Kenneth. I'm amazed at how some will find one semantic bone to pick, while skipping over the much more important larger consequences (intended or not). What is important here, as you point out, is the idea of disruption as driven by a technological catalyst and the resulting impact on entire industries. And another important distinction. Hayek and Schumpeter both saw entrepreneurialism as the force that drove creative destruction. But what is interesting about what we're seeing is the role of the user in this, empowered by new technological capabilities and challenging an existing supply chain. There is a networked, distributed dynamism at work here that may be a brand new flavor of disruption.

  • The Face Of Disruption by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 02/23/2016)

    Thanks Paula..I assume you mean for President. I would say I don't qualify, but seeing as both Ted Cruz and I were born in Calgary, who knows?

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