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PHYLLIS FINE

Phyllis Fine is columns editor for MediaPost. You can reach Phyllis at pfine@mediapost.com.

Articles by Phyllis All articles by Phyllis

  • Guess Where Zsa Zsa Was On July 27, 1990? Decades Will Tell You in TV Watch on 07/29/2015

    Networks like MeTV are now repurposing the seemingly endless inventory of old TV shows - just as Turner Classic Movies turned the showing of old films into a sometimes-educational, entertaining experience mingling nostalgia and discovery. Still, until this year no network had taken the TCM path of curating programming in all kinds of smart and/or fun ways. But now there's Decades, launched earlier this year.

  • 'Mad Men' Accurately Portrays Sexism In The '60s in MediaDailyNews on 05/14/2015

    Grappling with the eternal question of how accurate "Mad Men" has been at reflecting the real ad biz, leading creators focused on the industry's issues with women at a panel discussion at The Museum of the Moving Image.

  • Jon Hamm's Stint In Rehab: PR Stunt?  in TV Watch on 04/01/2015

    The promotional push for fans to watch those series-ending seven episodes of AMC's "Mad Men" (which begin April 5) is a slam-bang, exhaustive PR/ad campaign. I've seen the show mentioned in seemingly every conceivable media outlet. But there's one piece of current "MM" news I'm not sure how to take. Have you seen the reports about star Jon Hamm completing a 30-day stint in rehab for alcoholism?

  • Got Lost On The Way To Your Favorite Shows? in TV Watch on 03/18/2015

    It's now mid-March. Do you know when your favorite TV/video shows are on -- and/or when they're coming back in the next year? How much prep will you have to do so you don't miss the next round of, say, Showtime's "Masters of Sex"?

  • This Is Going To Be Hilarious in MAD on 10/21/2014

    Ad folks, want to make sure your socially conscious message gets heard? Start with a "spoonful of sugar." Yes, the one Mary Poppins famously said "helps the medicine go down." And as Funny or Die shows, humor is a pretty sweet way to do it. Or consider how CBS News Correspondent Mo Rocca kicked off his Advertising Week panel examining exactly how to "leverage" the laugh. "Today we're going to be talking about famine and workplace discrimination," he began, followed by a litany of equally mood-dampening topics. (Pregnant pause.) "And it's going to be hilarious."

  • This Is Going To Be Hilarious in MediaPost Weekend on 10/19/2014

    Ad folks, want to make sure your socially conscious message gets heard? Start with a "spoonful of sugar." Yes, the one Mary Poppins famously said "helps the medicine go down." And as Funny or Die shows, humor is a pretty sweet way to do it. Or consider how CBS News Correspondent Mo Rocca kicked off his Advertising Week panel examining exactly how to "leverage" the laugh. "Today we're going to be talking about famine and workplace discrimination," he began, followed by a litany of equally mood-dampening topics. (Pregnant pause.) "And it's going to be hilarious."

  • Report: AMC In Talks For Stake In BBC America in Around the Net In Media on 07/31/2014

  • Newspapers Lost 1,300 Newsroom Employees In 2013 in Around the Net In Media on 07/30/2014

  • Time Warner Cable Agrees To Arbitration To Decide Dodgers TV Dispute in Around the Net In Media on 07/30/2014

  • RTB Panelists Address Lag Between Tech And Creative in Show Daily on 07/24/2014

Comments by Phyllis All comments by Phyllis

  • Donald Trump, The Clickbait Candidate by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 08/25/2015)

    I'm Gord's editor at MP, so I don't usually comment on his posts. Still, I've been editing a lot of posts lately on Trump, as well as reading about him elsewhere. Sigh -- wish we didn't find the guy so irresistible as a topic. I'm afraid all this attention further legitimizes his candidacy. This column is the best, most thoughtful commentary I've read among many. Thanks, Gord, for your interesting historical perspective.

  • Guess Where Zsa Zsa Was On July 27, 1990? Decades Will Tell You by Phyllis Fine (TV Watch on 07/29/2015)

    You're kinda right, John. I realize now that calling Kuryakin a Russian spy could sound misleading. Though technically he was Russian AND a spy, he wasn't working for the Soviets, but for U.N.C.L.E. -- the presumed good guys -- and was indeed a co-star of the show. 

  • Episode 612: 'The Quality of Mercy,' or, Jewish Mothers, Crying Babies, And They Shot Kenny! by Barbara Lippert (Mad Blog on 06/17/2013)

    Thanks, Rob, for pointing out the mistake in the theme song quote -- "hot fudge" has been corrected to "hot dog" as the item that leads to loss of control for Patty, the girl "who's only seen the sights a girl could see from Brooklyn Heights." Shoulda sung the whole song to myself before editing! Phyllis MediaPost Editor

  • Better Than Death: Jaguar Gets Its Due by Barbara Lippert (Mad Blog on 04/26/2013)

    Editor's Note: Duly noted, and corrected.

  • Yes, It's The @!#'^% Technology by David Koretz (Online Publishing Insider on 10/20/2011)

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  • Episode 11: The Gypsy and the Hobo by Barbara Lippert (Mad Blog on 10/28/2009)

    Just a note from behind the editorial scenes at MediaPost. I also thought, along with Dorothy, that Roger said "somewhat" to Annabelle's comment about still wanting her. But a quick check found that commenter Wendy Swiggett was indeed right: Roger actually said "So what?" So we corrected the text.

  • Set Top Box Research: A Call for More Open Dialogue by Ed DeNicola (TV Board on 08/07/2009)

    Here's a comment we just received from Erwin Ephron of the Ephron Consultancy:"The inadequacies of current set top box data have to be seen against those of current panel data. The Nielsen samples are far too small to accurately report fragmented TV. This is a panel cost problem which cannot be solved. The Nielsen in-tab response rates are too low for the panel to be considered a random sample. This cannot be solved. With some work set top box data can improve both. If we were starting today to measure TV, combining set top box and panel data would be the measurement model of choice." Erwin Ephron

  • Esquire by William J. McGee (Magazine Rack on 04/23/2009)

    Editor’s Note: In response to this post, MediaPost received the following email from Nathan Christopher, director of public relations for Hearst Magazines: Many thanks for featuring Esquire in "Magazine Rack." However, in the interest of accuracy, I wanted to correct a couple of points made in this article. -- Esquire's February issue was never called out for ASME violations. There was never any doubt that what we did was within the guidelines. More to the point: The February cover flap opened to reveal more editorial about the issue -- cover lines and an image. There was an ad on the BACK side of the flap, just like on a traditional cover. But Esquire did NOT have an ad on the cover. Regarding both the February and the May issue covers, here's something that's really important to note: These were editorial creations. In both of these cases, the focus was on editorial, not advertising. They were created to further reader engagement and push the boundaries of print, not to create new advertising opportunities, although that was certainly a primary benefit. -- The May cover showcases three men -- Clooney, Obama and Justin Timberlake, not "25 other guys." -- Our October 2008 eInk cover did not contain blinking lights. That was actually eInk itself (electronic ink). No lights were involved. Thanks for your attention to this. We always enjoy reading the column, and would believe you'd want to be as accurate as possible within it. <P> <P> <P> <P>

  • Esquire by William J. McGee (Magazine Rack on 04/23/2009)

    Editor's Note: We also received the following email from Sid Holt, Chief Executive, American Society of Magazine Editors: The review of the new issue of Esquire says that ASME “called out” Esquire over its Obama cover -- which ASME did not -- then selectively quotes from the ASME Web site to imply that ASME still disapproved of the Esquire cover even while “issu[ing] an acquittal,” which distorts ASME’s position. The ASME Board of Directors concluded that the Obama cover was not a guidelines violation, and there were members of the board who thought the use of the trap door, while controversial, was innovative. End of story. You can read the ASME summary here: http://www.magazine.org/asme/asme_guidelines/recent-guidelines-decisions.aspx This story got what happened wrong -- and the writer went out of his way to get it wrong. <P> <P> <P>

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