Search by name, company, title, location, etc.

Maarten Albarda

Member since April 2002Contact Maarten

Global Citizen. Flying Dutchman. Dabbling in Integrated Marketing for clients anywhere they need me. http://about.me/malbarda

Meet Maarten at MediaPost Events

  • Maarten attended OMMA at SXSW, March 07, 2014
    3/7: AT&T Center | 3/8: Textile, 310 E 3rd St, Austin

Articles by Maarten All articles by Maarten

  • Digital Is NOT Making Us Smarter in Media Insider on 11/17/2017

    The new paradigm I would like to propose is that digital "everything" is making us more accountable and transparent -- but not smarter. Let me explain.

  • The Second Coming Of Pitch-A-Palooza: What's Different, What's The Same in Media Insider on 11/03/2017

    Just when the agency holding companies thought that the worst of the pitch avalanche was behind them, we find ourselves in a second wave. And this second wave (2017/2018) actually appears to be larger than the first (2015/2016). The list of marketers that are actively reviewing their ecosystems, and those who have considered doing so, comprises a "who's who" of, well - many.

  • Are Agency Careers A Dead End? in Media Insider on 10/20/2017

    A couple of years ago, I asked the readers of this column "Would You Want To Be A Media Agency CEO In 2015?" The point was that the role of leading an agency, or a group of agencies, was not an easy job. Fast-forward to today, when agencies and their holding company motherships have become damaged goods, with revenues and margins facing south, growth stagnant, their very existence threatened.

  • The Much-Needed End Of Marketing Cycles in Media Insider on 10/06/2017

    According to a recent survey, all respondents -- marketing-driven advertisers -- ranked their own internal process, or "way of working," as their biggest obstacle to delivering effective marketing strategies.

  • The Disappearance Of Advertising-Supported Media in Media Insider on 09/22/2017

    We, consumers of media, have access to an ever growing number of platforms and providers all ready to entertain, inform and engage us. The biggest challenge seems to be not figuring out the limitations of what new technologies and creative minds can come up with, but how to make a decent living creating it all.

  • A J.K. Simmons-Inspired List Of The Three Biggest Reasons For Marketing Change in Media Insider on 09/08/2017

    The Farmers Insurance's campaign tag line, perfectly delivered by Oscar-winning actor J. K. Simmons, is: "We know a thing or two, because we've seen a thing or two." I love this line, as it suggests Farmers policies constantly evolve because of its consumers' experiences. We all know a thing or two, and as we get older and gather more experience, we might even know a thing or three. One such area where I now know a thing or three is marketers' biggest reasons for wanting to change. And as the marketing world descends on Cologne, Germany for dmexco, I thought it would be helpful to frame the issues we should be talking about by revealing the most-typical statements I've heard from marketers about changing agencies.

  • The Agency Holding Company Model Is NOT Dead -- Just Challenged in Media Insider on 08/25/2017

    After WPP's poor financial showing in its latest results, much has been made of the imminent demise of Sir Martin's agency conglomerate, and the ad agency holding company model in general. Let's be clear: there are a lot of pressures on that model. But it should survive -- in one form or another.

  • P&G, ANA -- And The Big, Bad Agency Holding Companies in Media Insider on 08/11/2017

    The agency holding companies continue to find themselves the pariahs of the industry, implicated in dubious media-buying practices, non-transparent digital media processes - and now by murky advertising production practices as well.

  • Storytellers, Content Factories And The Diminishing Role Of Influencers in Media Insider on 07/28/2017

    You know that something has become "a thing" when that something finds its way into marketing speak and marketing titles. The city of Detroit has recently appointed Aaron Foley as chief storyteller for the city. Antonio Lucio, CMO of HP, calls himself a mix of chief brand officer, chief marketing people officer, chief alignment officer and chief storyteller.

  • Chief Endangered Marketing Officer in Media Insider on 07/14/2017

    I have written in the past that the CMO of today is really the chief advertising officer, because many of the traditional CMO duties have been taken over by chief technology officers, chief growth officers, chief innovation officers, chief revenue officers and other members in the C-suite. I noted that of the four traditional Ps, only the poorly named P for "promotion" was still part of the CMO's responsibilities. I posited that, as a result, the CEO of today is truly the CMO, as the CEO alone has end responsibility for all four Ps (to refresh your memories, or teach you a relic from old school marketing, the four P's stand for price, place, product and promotion). This assumption has now been confirmed by research presented in the Harvard Business Review called "Why CMOs Never Last" by Kimberly Whitler and Neil Morgan.

Comments by Maarten All comments by Maarten

  • The Disappearance Of Advertising-Supported Media by Maarten Albarda (Media Insider on 09/22/2017)

    Ed: thanks as always for thoughtful comments. I would say I am not barking up one particular tree, but at least three: Advertisers need to do a better job briefing what they want/need, and use the (growing) data for insights around understanding their target audience, and where the advertiser might have an opportunity or permission to inject their message. Advertisers also need to do a better job at evaluating and optimizing their buys, regardless of the medium. Mobile Oil wasted money on me, but more importantly, in general with an over-the-top frequency. Agencies need to do a better job planning and buying. They need to educate and evolve the advertisers (back) to media planning principles that actually haven't gone away but have been neglected. They need to push back on briefings that are mostly focused on "efficient", "reach" or "low cost" to a better articulation of who they need to reach, how/when/where they might reach them and how much they need to be in front of them and with what type of content.  Platforms, whether TV, USA Today or Facebook (or any programmatic related entity), need to do a much better job at setting some guidelines and monitoring buys to ensure they are not counter-productive to the consumer experience. Mobile Oil should absolutely advertise in an F1 race. But perhaps 4x and not 15plus times. NBC should "protect" Mobile from itself (if their instruction led to this waste of ad budget) or their agency (if they were the ones instructing). In our work with advertisers, we absolutely call them out on this. It is, after all, their money. And I can dream, can't I?

  • The Magic Of AI -- And Amy Ingram by Sarah Fay (AI Insider on 07/07/2017)

    Hey Sarah: I, too, have used Amy. She is a miracle worker most of the time. But just like any other person learning how to read and make independent decisions, she is not without mistakes. The other day, a participant in a call scheduled by Amy, sent me and Amy an email that he was running behind and could we start 15 minutes later. I was fine with that, but Amy, not grasping that the call was going ahead but a little later, messaged me that the other party had let her know he was now unavailable at the scheduled time so she had gone ahead and cancelled the call, and was looking to reschedule.Confusion ensued and I managed to let the other party know that 15 minutes later was OK. I think Amy is now still trying to reschedule the call even though it took place already...It is the first mishap I have encountered, and I will let the developers know. Perhaps they can tweak Amy's learning algorithm appropriately. Other than this incident I have been impressed!

  • A Little Media Island Called The USA by Maarten Albarda (Media Insider on 06/12/2017)

    Hi Kevin: I am well aware of some of these limitations. Yet, the ANA exists, as does the 4A's and the IAB. And they collaborate and discuss issues of mutual concern (and/or fall out over issues of concern... "coughtransparencycough"). Limitations aside, I think the real point of my post is not to say that the US should seek more/better industry-wide collaboration. The point is that other parts of the world are innovating marketing and advertising at the speed of light just as much as the US is. And it pays to pay attention to some of those initiatives as they could be imported/adapted to the US just as easily as some of our stuff gets used over there.

  • How I Cleared A Room Full Of Marketing Techies by Gord Hotchkiss (Online Spin on 05/16/2017)

    Very much agree! The other weird thing: almost all of us in this industry are in a B2B role! We sell the capabilities and services we deliver as an individual or as part of a company TO ANOTHER COMPANY (i.e. agency/martech/production/media to an advertiser)! So if anything, we should be very interested in how to do this really well or how to do it better. B2B is advertising to the silver generation vs. millennials. B2B is coffee vs. a Unicorn Frappucino.Oh well...

  • Does Anyone Even Care About #BrandFails? by Dinah Alobeid (Marketing Daily on 04/24/2017)

    I wrote about the "SMFP" (social media faux pas) impact back in 2014. I included some consumer outrage examples from at that time. I think most if not all are usually totally forgotten, and sometimes even forgiven. Some tarnished names make a remarkable come-back a few years later. I think the shelf life impact of outrage flare-ups is getting shorter and shorter. Here is my original post from 2014: https://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/224480/short-term-vs-long-term-effects-of-a-smfp-social.html

  • Let's Play Ball: Sports Sponsorship Hits And Misses by Maarten Albarda (Online Spin on 04/10/2017)

    Hey Scott: thanks for commenting. I think what Coke did in sponsorship of the Legends event was exactly right. They could do a WHOLE lot more stuff like that had they not plonked down a boat load of cash into the MLB naming rights. "Buy what you need" does not apply to the MLB, especially if you already have the majority of the teams. And to be honest, I know a bit about the ROI on MLB naming rights and team sponsorship. I would venture that neither pays back.

  • I Mean, The Death Of Proper Storytelling Is Upon Us by Cory Treffiletti (Online Spin on 04/05/2017)

    I am with Bobby: can I make an empassioned plea to eradicate the word "So..." at the start of almost any answer/sentence. I. Hate. It.

  • For A Spectrum Cable Customer, Company's 'New Day' Is Elusive by Adam Buckman (TVBlog on 04/03/2017)

    We, too, are transitioning from TWC to Spectrum here in NC. A new day has not dawned on us either. A new logo has, though, so we've got that going for us. We had no other choice to go with the change anyway, as there is no choice where we live. Unless you want to go satellite or cut the chord. So there you have it: consumer choice is to buy Spectrum, or not buy cable at all. I don't think you need to launch a big branding effort if that is your market position.

  • Brands Need To Stop Shafting Agencies -- Right Now by Sean Hargrave (London Blog on 02/17/2017)

    Chris: consultants are often brought in by and paid from the budget of procurement so that argument does not hold.

  • Marketing AI: How Not To Make An A.R.S.E. Of It by Maarten Albarda (Online Spin on 01/16/2017)

    Thanks Joshua - does that include the data that informs the decisions? My thinking was that there needs to be a record of the actual data that helped inform the decision, especially to understand what the drivers of a decision were, and to ensure the decisions aren't influenced by data manipulation.

About Edit

You haven't told us anything about yourself! Surely you've got something to say. Tell us a little something.