Commentary

Streaming And Time Shifting Each 25% Of Viewing Time

According to GfK MRI, in recently-released data, digital streaming now represents an estimated one-quarter of time spent watching TV, closing the gap with live TV, which occupies a leading 39% of all time spent using TV content. Streaming is on par with time-shifting via DVR, which also captures an estimated one-quarter of viewing time. The study indicates that content viewers are spending almost one-tenth of their TV viewing time streaming through a traditional TV set.

advertisement

advertisement

When consumers were separately asked about the devices on which they watch TV shows, they estimated spending 28% of their TV time streaming content to various devices:

  • Online streaming through a traditional TV set accounts for 9% of time spent watching TV;str
  • Accessing subscription or free online platforms via a computer or mobile device accounts for 16%; and
  • The remaining 3% comes from other methods for accessing content, such as portable game consoles.

The new report also reveals that 41% of TV viewers are “Digital Enthusiasts,” who subscribe to at least three digital TV services online, as well as maintain a traditional pay TV subscription (cable/satellite/telco). Other new and emerging viewer groups identified through this study include

  • “TV 2.0” – combine the best of both worlds, accessing traditional and streaming TV content, mostly through their TV sets  
  • “On-the-Go Getters” – watch their TV programming only on mobile devices  

Digital Enthusiasts are more likely than other groups to use TV network apps for TV viewing; 44% currently use network apps that do not require a cable subscription, and 35% use network apps that do require a cable subscription. Overall, Digital Enthusiasts spend $10.80 per month on apps. 57% are also frequent (“all the time/often”) binge viewers, and they note that the Internet is their “most trusted media source.”  

In addition, according to the report, 30% of TV viewers report watching a program on a smartphone in the past 30 days, and 29% say they have used a tablet to watch TV content in the same time frame. Overall, smartphones and tablets account for 8% of all TV time; and the average number of apps used to view TV programs in the past 30 days is about 7 for mobile devices.

The report also documents the continuing appeal of traditional “live” TV viewing. “Watch a show live when it is first broadcast” placed at #1 among favorite ways to watch TV; and viewing “live when broadcast” accounts for 39% of all time spent using TV content.

When consumers were separately asked about the devices on which they watch TV shows, they estimated spending 28% of their TV time streaming content to various devices:

  • Online streaming through a traditional TV set accounts for 9% of time spent watching TV;
  • Accessing subscription or free online platforms via a computer or mobile device accounts for 16%; and
  • The remaining 3% comes from other methods for accessing content, such as portable game consoles.

Traditional live TV remains consumers’ favorite means of consuming TV viewing, per the study, which also found fewer than one-third of TV viewers reporting having watched a program on a smartphone (30%) or tablet (29%) during the prior 30 days.

Also of note: while streaming continues to gain popularity, it doesn’t appear to be at the expense of pay-TV subscriptions. The Diffusion Group (TDG) shows that among US adult broadband users, 84% of Netflix users also use legacy pay-TV, down only slightly from 2012 (87%). The percentage of legacy pay-TV users also using Netflix has grown from 36% to 49% during that same period.

For additional information, please visit here.

 

 

1 comment about "Streaming And Time Shifting Each 25% Of Viewing Time".
Check to receive email when comments are posted.
  1. Ed Papazian from Media Dynamics Inc, July 31, 2015 at 7:57 a.m.

    I hope that the folks at Nielsen are taking note of this ond other studies where respondents attempt to describe their general TV viewing patterns---how much is "live", how much is delayed, how much is streamed, etc. Clearly the results from Nielsen's meter panel are at odds with these findings. The reason is simple. When you ask a person how much time he/she spends watching "live TV" without reference to specific telecasts and shows, you get a highly impressionistic answer, which is very questionable as to its volumetric accuracy. When you ask the same person to go through the last 24 hours, time slot by time slot, and force the respondent to think specifically about each telecast, starting with a 7AM news report, a daytime movie, an early evening game show and sitcom a primetime reality show, a police drama and, finally, some late night fare, most people will give quite different answers than they offer when the questions are posed in completely generalized terms.

    Perhaps it's time for someone at Nielsen to comment about this. Even more interesting would be a study by Nielsen of a sample of its panel members---say 1000 of them---or ex-panel members who recently dropped out, asking them how they allocated their TV usage time by platform, delayed vs. live, etc, and then comparing the answers with the meter findings from the same people. Say that the panel members claimed that they watch live TV only 30% of the time but their own meter records show the figure to be 80%. A study of this sort might put the matter finally to rest.

Next story loading loading..