Commentary

90% Of Parents Put Time Limit On Child Use Of Internet-Connected Devices

The world of Internet-connected things is hitting home.

Most parents allow their children to take their Internet-connected devices to bed, but most also put a limit on how much time their children can spend using those devices per day.

These are among the findings of a global study focused on family dynamics in a connected world.

The study, conducted by OnePoll for Intel Security, comprised a survey of 13,000 adults who use an Internet-connected device on a daily basis. Consumers were surveyed in Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, the U.K. and the U.S.

The majority (76%) of parents allow their child to bring an Internet-connected device to bed and almost a third (32%) of parents monitor their child’s use of the device in the bedroom.

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Overall, almost all (90%) parents typically put a limit on how much time their child can spend using Internet-connected devices each day. Here’s how much time children are allowed per day:

  • 48% -- One to two hours
  • 21% -- Less than one hour
  • 21% -- Three to four hours
  • 6% -- More than four hours
  • 5% -- No time limit

Weekends are slightly different, with 12% of parents saying children should have unlimited device usage.

When parents don’t allow their child to take their Internet-connected devices to bed, most (60%) encounter no issues.

To monitor device usage, more than a third (36%) of parents keep the device in their possession and give it to their child when they are there to monitor, while 23% use software to monitor online behavior.

It’s not only parents who monitor their children’s use of Internet-connected devices: more than a third (36%) of children regularly call out their parents for being on their device too much during family time.

5 comments about "90% Of Parents Put Time Limit On Child Use Of Internet-Connected Devices".
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  1. Aimee Stern from stern Communications, January 25, 2017 at 10:42 a.m.

    What ages are the chidren who were studied?

  2. Douglas Ferguson from College of Charleston, January 25, 2017 at 10:42 a.m.

    I see more and more young children watching videos on a parent's phone as they ride around the grocery and other stores. It keeps them docile but do they learn to process the real world? Peering out the car window seems an unknown activity for many child and teen passengers.

  3. Chuck Martin from Chuck Martin replied, January 25, 2017 at 10:50 a.m.

    It's the parents who were surveyed, Aimee. If it helps, here are the ages of the parents surveyed: 18-24, 6%; 25-34, 24%; 35-44, 25%; 45-54, 20%.

  4. Chuck Martin from Chuck Martin replied, January 25, 2017 at 10:55 a.m.

    Further to your point, Douglas, adults spend an equal amount of time at home online as they do interacting with others face-to-face, based on the survey.

  5. Paula Lynn from Who Else Unlimited, January 25, 2017 at 11:01 a.m.

    Here is one topic that Douglas and I can agree upon.

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