• Revenge Of The Millennials
    Just the other day, apropos nothing in particular, my 9-year-old son declared, "All old people are crazy." After I put down my walking stick and took a hearty sip from my glass of Metamucil, I asked my kid to elaborate.
  • Success: How 4 Brands Are Winning With Millennials
    Millennials are savvier than any generation that came before them. And, at 80 million strong, they own a collective $200 billion in annual buying power, according to Forbes.
  • It's Not About The Snacks: Millennials Are More Complex Than That
    The millennial generation is now the largest generation with the greatest combined purchasing power in history, which makes this demographic a force to be reckoned with - and important to understand. At a recent industry conference, numerous panels and conversations were focused on cracking the code to millennials and advertising products and services to them. Multiple executives named workplace snacks, lax work environments, casual dress codes and social media-driven projects as the winning factors to convincing millennials to choose a company and join a workplace.
  • Nostalgia Runs Deep Among Semi-acculturated Latina Millennials
    The semi-acculturated Latina Millennial persona is called Rebecca Raices. She is the "Heritage Homemaker" who is an emotion-based shopper. Her levels of comfort and immersion with broader American society sparks a strong desire to reconnect with her Hispanic roots. Food is the most meaningful access to that nostalgia.
  • Millennials Love Radio. Wait, What?
    Many folks in the media business accept at face value the false narrative that young people (aka Millennials) have stopped listening to radio. It's easy to fall for this trope if you aren't paying close attention to what Millennials value in terms of content. If you are paying close attention, The facts suggest otherwise.
  • 3 Thematic Strategies for Engaging Millennials
    Though Generation Z is fast approaching the workforce, millennials are still a force to be reckoned with. Millennials, who just a few years ago were graduating from college and filling out corporate staffs, are now in the C-suite.
  • 'Rock the Vote?' More Like, 'Meh the Vote'
    Twenty-five years ago, the artist formerly known as Madonna Louise Ciccone-dressed in a red bikini and draped in an American flag-vogued her way through an MTV public service announcement to extol the virtues and benefits of voting. The Material Girl was just one of myriad early-1990s musicians and celebutantes who jumped on the Rock the Vote bandwagon that encouraged young people to perform their civic duties and engage in the political process.
  • By 2020, Viewership On Mobile Is Forecasted To Dominate Content Consumption
    Over the last year, mobile advertising increased by 65%, according to PEW Research Center. Mobile-only platforms like Snapchat are no doubt capturing the attention of digital consumers. As such, it wouldn't be a surprise if by 2020, viewership for streaming content on mobile devices will surpass traditional TV among millennials based on current patterns.
  • How Millennials Are Shaking Up Retail Commerce
    Millennials are becoming retailers' largest demographic in both population size and market influence with significant buying power due to their constant access to technology. Over 85% of millennials own a smartphone compared to 71% of the total U.S. population, and their mobile-first experiences are set to reshape the economy and change the ways in which consumers trade. Already, a quarter of millennials recently surveyed report 100% of their online purchases were on smartphones - and marketers in retail are taking note, but in some cases, not fast enough.
  • The 15 Companies Millennials Most Want To Work For
    Though Millennials might be changing the workplace culture (and causing workers from other generations strife), they're also highly desired employees. A 2014 study found that companies with 30% of young employees in higher roles saw "aggressive growth," and those with 21% and under showed "no/minimal" growth. But where do they most want to work? In our most recent monthly survey, we asked 800 18-33 year olds to tell us the company they'd most like to work for to find out.
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